Jump to content
tanknet.org

Recommended Posts

  • Replies 115
  • Created
  • Last Reply

Top Posters In This Topic

Dalmore has an odd flavor due to the brine seeping through the casks. Macallans is quite tasty as is Laphroaig and Glenlivet. I've had Macallans 25 before which was astonishingly smooth.

Link to post
Share on other sites
Usually I drink Glenlivet. My favorite scotch (within a reasonable price range...) though is Laphroaig, however that is something of an acquired taste, and I usually prefer to keep a bottle on hand that guests will also enjoy.

 

 

Old Sheep Dip..... nuff said

Link to post
Share on other sites

I like Lagavulin for its smokiness, and The Macallan for a bit of tartness. But I'm prettty much out of the single malt phase of a few years back and stick mostly to the greatest of all spirits: small batch Kentucky bourbon!

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 2 weeks later...

Toured the distillery of Glenmorangie a couple years ago and they said every year the scotch sits in barrels a certain portion is lost through the wood, 'the angels share'. IIRC they explained that if you like the old stuff great, but don't assume it is automatically better than the newer bottlings. A big reason the oldies cost more is they get so much less out of each barrel.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Since arriving in the UK, I have developed my taste for a good single malt. My current favorite is The Balvenie. I have one bottle that I am saving for my return to the States. 15 Year old single malt finished in a Port cask.

 

I like Glemorangie for a genreal purpose sipping whiskey. I enjoy the peaty, smoky flavor imparted by their particular malt. I used to work with a Scottish guy who would bring in bottle from his "home" distillery. The brand name was Aberfeldy. It comes from around Aberdeen. Very nice balance of peat and spice in that particular label.

Link to post
Share on other sites
OK, have now worked more or less through Phase I of the great experiment.

 

The great question now; is the better scotch one which is the longer-aged or the better-flavored?

Shot

 

Drink what tastes good to you, and don't worry about it! By that reasoning, a nicely aged cow patty would be preferable to a fresh steamer! :P

 

Check out Dave Broom's "A Handbook of Whisky". A friend gave that to me as a b-day gift a few years back. Good little read, with lots of reviews. This is also an interesting site:

 

The Scotch Blog

Edited by BP
Link to post
Share on other sites
Drink what tastes good to you, and don't worry about it! By that reasoning, a nicely aged cow patty would be preferable to a fresh steamer! :P

 

Now, now, BP, don't be disgusting, this is Tanknet after all. Rude yes, disgusting, no. Mind you, this might change. Then again, it might not. But it might.

 

Methinks I've been here a trifle too long. :blink:

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 2 weeks later...

Currently working through a bottle of Glenfiddich 18, with a bottle of The Balvanie single barrel 15 year on deck when I kill the 1st. Local NEX has a Hell of a selection of single malts and I love robbing the locals of their tax. S/F....Ken M

Link to post
Share on other sites
Currently working through a bottle of Glenfiddich 18, with a bottle of The Balvanie single barrel 15 year on deck when I kill the 1st. Local NEX has a Hell of a selection of single malts and I love robbing the locals of their tax. S/F....Ken M

 

The Glenfiddich 15 year Solera Reserve is pretty darn good too.

 

I stocked up at the British forces cantine at Ramstein a couple of weeks ago. You can get good scotch for cheap there, even cheaper than at duty free. Provided of course you have a ration card or a buddy willing to use his for you.

Link to post
Share on other sites
The Glenfiddich 15 year Solera Reserve is pretty darn good too.

 

I stocked up at the British forces cantine at Ramstein a couple of weeks ago. You can get good scotch for cheap there, even cheaper than at duty free. Provided of course you have a ration card or a buddy willing to use his for you.

 

 

When did the Brits move into Ramstein? I haven't been there since what, 1981 or so. Went there for a computer fair (Trash 80s, Heathkits, and Apple IIs....), and drove past the Headquarters building; all the windows had clear plastic covering them because they'd been blown out by a car bomb a few days previously...

Link to post
Share on other sites
When did the Brits move into Ramstein? I haven't been there since what, 1981 or so. Went there for a computer fair (Trash 80s, Heathkits, and Apple IIs....), and drove past the Headquarters building; all the windows had clear plastic covering them because they'd been blown out by a car bomb a few days previously...

 

I don't know how long it's been, but the NATO AFCENT (I think) HQ is there, hence the British presence (and others, there was a Canadian cantine in the same building one floor up), also LNOs at USAFE no doubt.

Link to post
Share on other sites
There seems to be a distinction between amongst single-malts. Anyone know what, if any, the distinctions are?

Shot

 

It gets complicated. Lowland and Highland malts, east, central and west, light and dark. Every district has a unique flavour. I preferred the dark west-coast malts, with a distinct peaty flavour accented by the sea air. I never developed a taste for the lighter east-coast lowland malts.

 

In either case, though, aging is important... generally speaking, the older the better.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Well, I got a bottle of Lismore yesterday and it says something about being a 'Speyside'. The Laphroaig says it's an Islay, and the Speyburn is a Highland. My question meant to ask whether these appellations are distinctions in the single-malt distillation process, particular single-malt distillation processes, regional appellations that perhaps refer to ingredients acquired from particular areas, etc.

 

 

Shot

Link to post
Share on other sites
Went and picked up a bottle of Laphroaig for comparison. I've a 1/3rd of a bottle of the Glenfiddich left. S/F....Ken M

 

What do you think of it? It's possibly my favorite scotch, but people tend to either really like it, or really detest it. Maybe with more in the latter camp.

Link to post
Share on other sites
...people tend to either really like it, or really detest it.
Have to agree. I found it very strongly flavored; I didn't mind that but I could easily see where someone else might. The flavors aren't those that necessarily lend themselves to strength, either.

 

Again, I liked it but the friend I was drinking it with didn't. Surprisingly tasty (and cheap) was a bottle of Lismore I acquired. Clean, light, and still nicely flavored.

 

 

Shot

Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Loading...

×
×
  • Create New...