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Baldur's Gate 3 (from Cyberpunk 2077 (from Starfield), courtesy Threadjacker 3000)


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Baldur's Gate 3 is more of a hardcore D&D computer game. My advice is to search for 'walkthrough' and 'hints'  off web sites before you try the game. It will save time from figuring it out yourself as there is a hard learning curve.

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  • 2 weeks later...

Wait... BG3 is built on D&D 5e.  5e is an incredibly simple system.  Is BG3 just so poorly designed that you have to have a munchkin build to get through it easily?

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5 hours ago, Skywalkre said:

Wait... BG3 is built on D&D 5e.  5e is an incredibly simple system.  Is BG3 just so poorly designed that you have to have a munchkin build to get through it easily?

It is pretty easy with any build aslong as you understand game and D&D 5e mechanics.

My most "fun" build was Sword college bard 7 and thief 5 (DEX main stat, CHA second, CON third). I literally talked demon to kill himself (Gale reaction was hilarius) and it can do pretty much anything very, very well. With dual weapons 4 attack a round (6 if hasted), very high AC, can pick any lock, disarm all traps and can talk that demon to kill itself, etc :)

 

Edited by MiGG0
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5 hours ago, MiGG0 said:

It is pretty easy with any build aslong as you understand game and D&D 5e mechanics.

So they just do a poor job explaining how everything works?

While I've heard good things about BG3 I'll never play it as I hate 5e with a passion.  I've played the thing in person and it's just... boring as fuck.

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53 minutes ago, Skywalkre said:

So they just do a poor job explaining how everything works?

While I've heard good things about BG3 I'll never play it as I hate 5e with a passion.  I've played the thing in person and it's just... boring as fuck.

I haven't really payed attention to it as core D&D 5e rules are familiar to me playing such couple of years (BG3 is not exact copy of core rules... more like "house rules" of them). At the start they explain pretty much everything needed I think (I have just skipped those so really dont know).

IMO in real roleplaying games rules dont matter that much. It is how everything is presented/told (how story/choices unfolds). D&D 5e is just fine int that. Pathfinder, D&D 2e (or Rolemastes where you just search tables after tables) just are too slow in big combats when you need add, remove bonuses from everything. Works in computer environment tough. Best rule set that I have played is RuneQuest -> fast to play and still very detailed (hit locations, aiming etc).

Edited by MiGG0
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5e is a great ruleset to introduce new players to ttrpgs (like in a one-shot done in a single evening).  It is, however, an atrocious ruleset to use for a campaign that goes on for years.  I played in a 5e one-shot a friend ran for his birthday (Rick & Morty themed).  It was a good time because of the theme, the friend running it is just funny already, and it was great to hang out with the gang... but an hour into what would be a 4h evening I was bored beyond belief with 5e.  We were even leveling up every 20-30m and there was still nothing to the system (in comparison to other options out there).

I'm currently searching for a new system because the one my table has used (Pathfinder 1e) has been used for 7 years now, we know it and are painfully aware of its limitations, and trying to houserule away all the issues just leads to more.

Thankfully this might be the best time ever to look for new systems.  After Hasbro screwed the pooch with their OGL drama from last year everyone and their mother is finally making and releasing their own system (or newer editions of older systems).  I've heard a few people call this the Renaissance of ttrpgs and I am definitely excited to see what comes from it all.

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You definitely should check out RuneQuest rule set. It is pretty hardcore nowdays standards (1 critical hit to stomach, chest or head and you are dead) and combat is usually very small scale. 1 PC can only fight against at most 2 opponents effectively and even very skilled character is very worried if you need to fight against 3 (they can surround you and you cannot block/dodge all their attacks. They only need 1 good hit and you are dead). There are no classes/levels and your character is what ever you use during play (skills increase by using them!).

 

I used to play with these rules during late -80 and early -90 So probably first or second edition rules of RQ. Current RQ Glorantha is something like 7th edition? And probably have major changes that I do remember of it. IMO still best rules :)

Edited by MiGG0
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Well, different rulesets for different purposes, really. D&D always was a derivative of tabletop combat (and it shows), and it's designed for "heroic, high fantasy". RuneQuest is aimed to be much more realistic/limited while still in a medieval/fantasy setting; Glorantha as a world, however, never appealed to me (killer duck men, really? Maybe go easy on the pot intake, man). But the ruleset is solid; BRP is basically a reduction of RQ, and from that Call of Cthulhu was derived. Which also shows that it's malleable enough to be made to work with modern settings (well, at least in the analog age - Wild West to about 1990s).

HOWEVER, neither CoC, nor BRP or RQ are "heroic" rulesets where common sense does not apply. Every combat has a decidedly non-zero chance to hurt or kill player characters if the game master doesn't tone down the aggro level. To me, this was appealing. I like D100 based systems to begin with, you have an immediate sense of the difficulty of any given task. And the chance of real consequences makes you think twice about your actions. Downside, RQ sessions tend to be 95% planning an ambush/surprise attack, and then 5% dice-rolling action. Not every player's cup of tea. But CoC works well enough for investigative stories with occasional outbursts of violence (though, arguably, Gumshoe is slightly better adapted to that specific task).

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14 hours ago, Ssnake said:

Well, different rulesets for different purposes, really. D&D always was a derivative of tabletop combat (and it shows), and it's designed for "heroic, high fantasy". RuneQuest is aimed to be much more realistic/limited while still in a medieval/fantasy setting; Glorantha as a world, however, never appealed to me (killer duck men, really? Maybe go easy on the pot intake, man). But the ruleset is solid; BRP is basically a reduction of RQ, and from that Call of Cthulhu was derived. Which also shows that it's malleable enough to be made to work with modern settings (well, at least in the analog age - Wild West to about 1990s).

HOWEVER, neither CoC, nor BRP or RQ are "heroic" rulesets where common sense does not apply. Every combat has a decidedly non-zero chance to hurt or kill player characters if the game master doesn't tone down the aggro level. To me, this was appealing. I like D100 based systems to begin with, you have an immediate sense of the difficulty of any given task. And the chance of real consequences makes you think twice about your actions. Downside, RQ sessions tend to be 95% planning an ambush/surprise attack, and then 5% dice-rolling action. Not every player's cup of tea. But CoC works well enough for investigative stories with occasional outbursts of violence (though, arguably, Gumshoe is slightly better adapted to that specific task).

 

I played mostly setting of "Griffin Island" in RQ that was pretty much standalone and all references to Glorantha removed (I dont remember "killer duck mens" there :D). RQ is more of classical era setting than medieval (Lunar Empire being Romans, Dragon Pass tribes like Gauls and other tribes, bronze is main alloy, etc).

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