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NickM

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Gang, I've been thinking about this for a while, but for the last decade or so, I've become very uncertain about reopening psych hospitals.  I feel that, given the Long March thru institutions,  it won't be long before it gets weaponuzed.  I mean every so often,  some member of the American Psychiatric Association pops off something crazy and doesn't get defrosted. Then there's the gender fluidity movement, that's gotten traction. 

It makes me nervous as to what's next on the menu 

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On 10/13/2023 at 8:08 AM, NickM said:

Gang, I've been thinking about this for a while, but for the last decade or so, I've become very uncertain about reopening psych hospitals.  I feel that, given the Long March thru institutions,  it won't be long before it gets weaponuzed.  I mean every so often,  some member of the American Psychiatric Association pops off something crazy and doesn't get defrosted. Then there's the gender fluidity movement, that's gotten traction. 

It makes me nervous as to what's next on the menu 

Given the propensity for the American left to leverage habitual violent offenders during the 1960s, your concern is probably valid. 

 

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13 minutes ago, Ivanhoe said:

Given the propensity for the American left to leverage habitual violent offenders during the 1960s, your concern is probably valid. 

 

Plus some propensity, seen even in members of this Grate Sight, to qualify dissenters as "crazies". Especially when they are right.

Edited by sunday
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On 10/14/2023 at 6:27 AM, Ivanhoe said:

Given the propensity for the American left to leverage habitual violent offenders during the 1960s, your concern is probably valid. 

 

my primary concern is having somebody with an axe to grind being in a position to say 'person x who does (fill in the blank: eat meat; owns gun; goes to church; votes "R") is de facto crazy"

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The vast expansion of pseudo-conditions in the APA big book of bullshit directly feeds the pharmaceutical industry's need for "illnesses" that require life-long medication, not to mention the ersatz friendships offered one hour at a time by couch-owning shrinks.

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9 hours ago, seahawk said:

Yes, close institutions that offer help to people with depression or substance abuse, because some practitioners support the gender movement...

Unfortunately those people who need help usually end up in another institution at the cost of someone else's life or property. The time they are incarcerated is determined by a judge.

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Shouldn't that ideally be the case for someone sectioned for mental health issues? To in theory reduce the risk that people get the rubber room because they're politically unwelcome?

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15 hours ago, seahawk said:

Yes, close institutions that offer help to people with depression or substance abuse, because some practitioners support the gender movement...

Sorry. The institutions in question were closed decades ago. 

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On 10/16/2023 at 10:44 PM, rmgill said:

Sorry. The institutions in question were closed decades ago. 

Could you explain this. As I understand it there are about 1800 24-hour inpatient facilities in the USA. And the American Psychiatric Association is the main professional organization of psychiatrists and trainee psychiatrists in the United States, and the largest psychiatric organization in the world.

So what hospitals are long closed and which should be closed?

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1 hour ago, seahawk said:

Could you explain this. As I understand it there are about 1800 24-hour inpatient facilities in the USA.

 

These are smaller facilities not designed for long term care. It's one thing for someone to be put into a facilitiy for short term but those aren't geared for htat. 

https://www.nri-inc.org/media/1111/2015-tracking-the-history-of-state-psychiatric-hospital-closures-lutterman.pdf

 

For the last 60 years state mental health agencies (SMHA) have been building comprehensive community-based systems to care for persons with serious mental illnesses. SMHA have also refocused the use of state psychiatric hospitals on patients in major crisis, patients whose illnesses were not being adequately addressed in community settings, and increasingly forensic and other involuntary patients. Since the 1950s, the number of beds in state psychiatric hospitals has declined by over 91 percent. As a result of this phenomenon, many state psychiatric hospitals that had once served thousands of patients every day are now much smaller and many states that had multiple psychiatric hospitals have consolidated their acute inpatient services by merging facilities.

 

62 State Psychiatric Hospitals have Closed Since 1997

In the past 18 years, 22 states have closed or merged 62 state psychiatric hospitals, as shown in the map below (Figure 1). The number of state psychiatric hospitals has decreased from 254 to 195, a 24% reduction.
 

The closure of state psychiatric hospitals occurred east of the Rocky Mountains. However, many western states have only one or two state psychiatric hospitals as shown in the map below (Figure 2). While there may not have been closures of entire state psychiatric hospitals, the number of state psychiatric hospital beds has also decreased substantially during this period.

 

 

1 hour ago, seahawk said:

So what hospitals are long closed and which should be closed?

Long term care facilities. You know the ones that would take the homeless who are mentally ill and otherwise living on the street. 

Aydin Paladin's piece above covers a lot more than what I noted. She footnotes the crap out of everything. I highly suggest you give that a listen and watch. 

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