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National known cuisine


Rick

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For this uninformed (probably most of Midwestern American), the following:

U.S. -- steak, baked potato with butter and sour cream, lettuce salad with a mixture of summer garden vegetables and Ranch dressing.

Germany -- sausages and beer.

Great Britain -- fish&chips.

France -- bread and wine. And snails.

Japan -- fish and rice.

Italy -- pasta and wine. 

China -- whatever is on the local (U.S.) Chinese buffet. Probably unfair.

Mexico -- peppers, hot, up to an alternative to nuclear power. 

For the Midwesterner a tad more informed:

India -- curries and no beef.

Spain -- rice and wine. 

Russia -- vodka and borscht. 

MidEast -- flat bread and mutton sheep?

Australia -- beer and mutton.

 

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On Spain, pork products like Jabugo ham, are very noteworthy. Even if that is currently a secret, as if it were known worldwide we Spaniards would not be able to afford it ourselves.

A typical dish: roast suckling pig Segovia style:

https://elbernardino.com/en/tradition-of-roast-suckling-pig-in-segovia

http://paulstravelpics.blogspot.com/2018/01/the-legendary-suckling-pig-of-segovia.html

Another one: Cachopo

 

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IDK what is internationally recognized, but this is a decent article:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Serbian_cuisine

Due the mixture of central European, Mediterranean and Oriental cultures food is very diverse in origin, preparations and tastes.

Edited by bojan
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1 hour ago, bojan said:

IDK what is internationally recognized, but this is a decent article:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Serbian_cuisine

Due the mixture of central European, Mediterranean and Oriental cultures food is very diverse in origin, preparations and tastes.

My understanding is that a Turkey has quite the sweet tooth?

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Yes, way too much for my tastes, with horribly sweet coffee and tea.

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Spain - Paella

Russia - Borscht

--------------------

internationally feared "fermented" fish: ☢️
  Norway - Rakfist
  Sweden - Surströmming 
  Iceland - Hákarl
  Korea - Hongeo-hoe
[don't know if you can call this "cuisine" or condiments]

 

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Jamaica; curried oxtail, goat, and fish. 

Of course, all y'all are talking about lunch/dinner/supper fare. For breakfast, Southerners have ambrosia;

 

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Now that I think about it, I think I will vote podvarak for Serbia, since it is one of my favorite winter meals. :) There is no New Year/Christmas without podvarak and sauerkraut sarma (cabbage rolls with meat and rise stuffing). Best podvarak is made with whole pig's head on top, but is alas pretty rare to see that version those days. :(

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While goulash is probably the stereotypical Hungarian food here in the states. For me it will always be stuffed cabbage rolls like these.  https://budapestcookingclass.com/hungarian-stuffed-cabbage-rolls-recipe-toltott-kaposzta/

They have been a family gathering staple for as long as I can remember. My Mom's parents immigrated to Canada from Hungary in the early 1900s.

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3 hours ago, bojan said:

Now that I think about it, I think I will vote podvarak for Serbia, since it is one of my favorite winter meals. :) There is no New Year/Christmas without podvarak and sauerkraut sarma (cabbage rolls with meat and rise stuffing). Best podvarak is made with whole pig's head on top, but is alas pretty rare to see that version those days. :(

Sounds good. Traditionally, coffee or tea in the Balkans?

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@Rick Coffee, big time. Tee is generally viewed as "something you drink when you have cold". Also most teas that are drunk are various herbal versions (mint, chamomile etc), not green/black. Coffee is also made very, very strong and one of the many, many insults you can say to someone is "Even your coffee is weak". :D

 

@Harold Jones Old lady living next to my grandmother back in '80/90s was a Hungarian, never married, but liked children in general so I have tried most of the traditional Hungarian foods. Her homemade sweets and cakes* were fantastic. :)

*Funny thing Re Hungarians and cakes - go to google image search and type "Madjarica" (Serbo-Croatian for "women from Hungary"). Most results will be for a cake named "Madjarica". :)

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6 hours ago, Harold Jones said:

While goulash is probably the stereotypical Hungarian food here in the states. For me it will always be stuffed cabbage rolls like these.  https://budapestcookingclass.com/hungarian-stuffed-cabbage-rolls-recipe-toltott-kaposzta/

They have been a family gathering staple for as long as I can remember. My Mom's parents immigrated to Canada from Hungary in the early 1900s.

 

3 hours ago, bojan said:

@Harold Jones Old lady living next to my grandmother back in '80/90s was a Hungarian, never married, but liked children in general so I have tried most of the traditional Hungarian foods. Her homemade sweets and cakes* were fantastic. :)

*Funny thing Re Hungarians and cakes - go to google image search and type "Madjarica" (Serbo-Croatian for "women from Hungary"). Most results will be for a cake named "Madjarica". :)

There used to be a Hungarian restaurant in San Antonio's La Villita neighborhood.  I only remember getting desserts there.  They were awesome.

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