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90s NATO and WP OOB- What if


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9 hours ago, Perun said:

Does anyone have numeration and peace locations of those reserve divisions

Perun

Have a look at this old thread - the reserve divisions are discussed on page 3: https://www.tanknet.org/index.php?/topic/19844-polish-and-czechoslovak-armies-oobs-1989/page/3/

Numbering of the reserve divisions: 16th TD, 18th MRD, 26th MRD (Western military area) and 17th TD, 32nd MRD (Eastern military area).

Actual locations are not mentioned I'm afraid.

 

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1 hour ago, Captain Hurricane said:

Perun

Have a look at this old thread - the reserve divisions are discussed on page 3: https://www.tanknet.org/index.php?/topic/19844-polish-and-czechoslovak-armies-oobs-1989/page/3/

Numbering of the reserve divisions: 16th TD, 18th MRD, 26th MRD (Western military area) and 17th TD, 32nd MRD (Eastern military area).

Actual locations are not mentioned I'm afraid.

 

Thanks mate

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12 hours ago, Darth Stalin said:

@Pavel Novak:

do you know, how long would it take to fully mobilise and deploy:

1) lower readiness divisions from 1st and 4th Army?

2) 13th and 14th Tank Divisions in Eastern MD/2nd Army?

3) 5x reserve divisions (mobilised by regular units)?

4) artillery brigades of 7th Arty Division?

See here for what was planned (timetables are written here for major units, esspecially 1977, 1986):

In short in 1970s and 1980s whole mobilization should be done in about 4 days but mobilization trainings done in 1980s showed that this was too optimistic.

Re 2) 2nd Army creation was discontinued already in 1964 war plan. From that only reserve army HQ (without numeration) was supposed to be created based on Eastern Military District HQ without subordinated units. Though in some trainings it could be used as regular army by getting units from other formations or reserve.

I also stress here that war orbats in 1970s and 1980s were flexible and changing subordination of units according to current task was normal thing.

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And this might be interesting. What CIA knew about Czechoslovak mobilization units in 1982:

https://www.cia.gov/readingroom/docs/CIA-RDP82T00709R000100280001-6.pdf

They were correctly aware of the two closest ones in Bohemia, hinted that there is third one in Moravia and were lost in Slovakia where they were aware that something is here but no idea what exactly.

Now the question is if CIA could not identify units in Slovakia how could they gave numbers of mobilized divisions in the USSR?

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Sigint probably. Im guessing a lot of the stuff from Ukraine and Belorussia probably came via RAF Troodos.  Im guessing the Carpathians were probably a great problem listening in on Eastern Czechoslovakia at least.

And of course Karla rolled the entire Circus Czech network up...

Edited by Stuart Galbraith
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  • 2 months later...

Timeline for introduction/retirement of various armament in Yugoslavia:

Tanks:

- M-91 Vihor - Zero series of 30 vehicles in 1996, those would have 2+ gen passive image intensifier. Full series production in 1997, ~100 per year, with thermal sights, ERA and LWR (through it is possible that zero series would have had LWR also, that is not clear). Expected production was 1500 examples until end of 2010. Mid-life modernization was planned for ~2005.

- M-84/M-84A - production was supposed to end in 1995, when limit of 1000 produced would have been reached (750 of those for local use). Planed modernization - new APFSDS in 1993-94, new HEAT-DP replacing HE and HEAT in 1997-98, LWR and ERA in 1997. "Life extension" modernization in about 2005.

- T-55 - modernizations was supposed to start in 1992, with first Bn being ready until January 1993. 500 were expected to be modernized until end of 1999. Three phases of modernization: 1st - new APFSDS (copy of Israeli M111) and FCS in 1993, 2nd - Additional armor (With ~50% better KE and ~100% improved HEAT protection) and new modular transmission with 780hp engine in 1995-96, 3rd - ERA and LWR in 1997. Non-modernized "non perspective for modernization" T-55s were supposed to be retired until the end of 1999. It is not clear if additional T-55s would be modernized post 1999, or just gradually retired. Those tanks wound serve in the Armor Bns of the Infantry and Motorized Bdes (27 tanks per Bn) and 43  such Bns were planned, which is 1161 tank total.. 

IFVs/APCs:
- M-80A1 modification of M-80A IFV was supposed to enter full scale production in early 1992. Estimated production capability (limited by number of hulls that could be produced per year) - 100 per year. Additional 30 turret would be produced per year, used for modernization of existing ~750 M-80A IFVs. Base M-80 with HS-115 engines would be retired from use by mechanized infantry until end of 1999. and converted to various support vehicles. Mid-life upgrade in ~2005.

IBV M-90 reconnaissance vehicle, based on M-80A1 IFV was supposed to enter service in 1995-96. Difference include thermal sight, increased ammo storage by (400 x 30mm, 3000 x 7.62, 6 x ATGM), surveyance radar, also RWR and LWR. Crew of 4 (vehicle commander, gunner/ATGM operator, driver and radar operator) and 4 scouts would be carried (section leader, sniper and 2 regular scouts).

- M-80AP (Pioneer) engineer combat vehicle was supposed to enter service in early 2000s, in order to replace last M-60P APCs. 2+9 crew, armament - single 12.7mm AAMG.

Minelayer on M-80A chassis - was developed but was seen as low priority project.

VK-80A Bde command vehicle - was supposed to enter service in 1993. and replace BTR-50PK/PU used as command vehicles until end of 1999.

4x4/6x6 APC - was supposed to enter service in about 1994. In 1991. decision which one it would be was still in final stages with Austrian Pandur, domestic development based on VAB 6x6 and apparently Finnish XA-180 were contenders. No matter the vehicle domestic production was required. Armament was initially supposed to be either 12.7mm AAMG (2/3 of the combat vehicles), 30mm AGL (1/3 of the combat vehicles) or 7.62mm AAMG (vehicles in auxiliary roles). In late '90s armament on the combat vehicles would be upgraded with 1-men turret with AGL + 7.62 (1/3 of vehicles) or 12.7 + 7.62 (2/3 of the vehicles). Turret would be equipped with 2+ gen II.

BOV M-86 - 2/3 would get 1-men turret with 7.62mm MG while 1/3 would get 1-men turret with 12.7+7.62mm. Later one would be made from modified spare turrets from TAB-71.

 

More later.

Edited by bojan
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Other armored vehicles:

BRDM-2 - modernization to BRDM-2A standard was supposed to start in 1992. It included 12.7 instead of 14.5 MG, 2+ gen II, LRF, removal of auxiliary wheels and instalation of side doors, 150hp diesel engine, modernized transmission, SGDs, hatch on top of turret, reinforced suspension, new wheels and tires, new radios (2 per vehicle), additional floating aids on sides and trim vane. Until end of 1999. all non-modernized ones were supposed to be retired. For 46 motorized and infantry brigades there was need for 138 vehicles.

AT weapons:

- Short range ATGM and additional mid-range ATGMs - 1992 - Metis and Fagot-M. Both were actually ordered, but never delivererd. 

- Long range ATGM - 1992-93 - TOW-2 and Konkurs were considered. TOW had advantage of easy integration to helicopters (compatible with sight on Gazelle), while Konkurs had advantage of being more infantry portable and sharing launcher with Fagot.

Domestic short-range ATGM - Bumbar - 1997-98. 600m range, 800mm penetration, intended as replacement for RCLs

- Domestic Long range ATGM - 1999-2000. Requirements were 4.5-5km range, laser (laser beam riding) guidance and 900-1000mm penetration.

- Improvement of existing 9K11 launcers with SACLOS guidance - 1993

- improvement to Maljutka ATGM - 580mm penetration - 1992 (this was actually introduced earlier about 1989. as 9M14P1B1 missile, so I don't know why it is here...) , 800mm penetration - 1996-97.

- improvement of penetration of M79 "Osa" AT weapon to ~500mm and development of multi-purpose warhead - 1997-99

- new ammo for 82mm RCL with 500mm and increased effective range

 

Air defense:

- Igla MANPADS - 1991-92, license production in 1996, replacing Strela-2M/A. Some were delivered in early 1991.

- Additional Strela-10M - 1992 - also actually ordered but never delivered.

- Strela-10M2J/J1 - (domestic production) - 1993-94

- 30/2mm M-80A2 "Foka" SPAA - 1993-94

- Modernization of 30/2mm M-53 SPAA with new computerized sight with LRF (AFAIK Bofors BOFI) - 1993-94

- Modernization of 20/3mm BOV-3 SPAA with night sight - 1994-95. Potential integration to 30/2mm M-53 SPAA.

- S-300/SA-10 - one regiment in 1st half of 1990s (replacement for Dvina/SA-2), another regiment of second half of 1990s (replacement for Volkhov/SA-2).

- Buk/SA-11 - 2nd half of 1990s, to suplement Kub/SA-6

- Modernization of Kub/SA-6 and Neva/SA-3 systems - second half of 1990s

- Modernized 40mm L/70 guns, with 47 rounds magazine and remote control ability - 1997, project "AS-83"

 

Weapons to be retired:

- 57/2mm S-68 (ZSU-57-2) - until end of 1999.

- Strela-2 early models - until end of 1999./expiration date

- 30/2mm M-53 SPAA - older, non-modernized vehicles until end of 1999.

- all 20/1, 20/2 and 20/4mm AA guns of German origin - 1993.*

- 25/1mm M40, 37/1mm M39 AA-guns of Soviet origin - 1993.*

- 40/1mm M1, M12 AA guns and 40/2mm (naval) AA guns of US and British origin - 1993.*

- 40/1mm M67 AA guns - until end of 1999.**

*Those were in the territorial defense use only in 1991.

**Those were war reserve only in 1991.

More later.

 

Edited by bojan
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Artillery

- 105mm M56 howitzer with L/33 barrel - 1994-95. 105mm would be only left in 4-5 hill (Bn with 18), 1 mountain (Bn with 18) and ~20 light partisan brigades (Mixed Bn with single 105mm battery of 6). So total need was 228 guns.

- 122mm motorized howitzer - mid '90s. Basic 122mm D-30 on truck. For motorized brigades Further upgrades - automatic loading system - early 2000s. 26-27 motorized brigades would need 486 guns

- Additional 2S1 SP howitzers - 1993 - for 6 x armored and 20 x Mech Bdes there was a need for 468 vehicles, so most likely not all would be acquired then.

Self-propelled 152mm M84 gun-howitzer on truck chassis - until the end of 1999.

- Converted gun 152mm M46/86 L/45 - 1994 - this was supposed to supplement 130mm M46 guns

Cluster and extended range 128mm rockets for M-77 Oganj MRL - 1993-94. Zero series of cluster rockets was done in 1991. already.

Extended range rockets for M63 Plamen MRL - 1993

- Self propelled M63 Plamen MRL - 1992-93 - was introduced IRL as M-94 Plamen-S

New light 120mm mortar and self propelled 82mm and 120mm mortars - until the end of 1999,

60mm and 82mm mortars with extended range and lower weight - mid-90s

- Large artillery radar, cooperation with Sweden, and integration on FAP 2026 truck - mid '90s with end of it's development in Sweden. This is Swedish-Norwegian ARTHUR.

- Small artillery radar, cooperation with France, integrated on wheeled APC - second half of '90s. This is most probably French RATAC.

- New digital artillery command system - until end of 1999.

- Modernized 100mm ATG - mid '90s - FCS with LRF, meteorological sensor and automatic lead calculation. It is not clear if this would be mounted on stock T-12 or M87 Topaz (T-12 gun on D-30 carriage). New APFSDS ammo for 100mm ATG (this was actually introduced in small numbers already in 1991.)

 

Edited by bojan
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Much to my regret, the link I found on 2nd Guards Tank Army has been purged for some reason from Wikipedia, but I managed to find this other site on it, which seems to contain the same information.

https://www-2gvta-ru.translate.goog/doc/units/9gv/?_x_tr_sch=http&_x_tr_sl=auto&_x_tr_tl=en&_x_tr_hl=en-US&_x_tr_pto=wapp

 

47th Guards Tank Uman-Pomeranian Order of Lenin Red Banner Orders of Suvorov, Kutuzov and Bogdan Khmelnitsky Regiment;

65th Guards Tank Sevsko-Pomeransky Order of Lenin twice Red Banner Orders of Suvorov, Kutuzov and Bogdan Khmelnitsky Regiment;

67th Guards Tank Red Banner Order of Suvorov Regiment (Ratenov);

60th Motorized Rifle Red Banner Order of Bogdan Khmelnitsky Regiment;

724th Guards Self-Propelled Artillery Warsaw Order of Alexander Nevsky Regiment;

66th Guards Anti-Aircraft Missile Lublin Orders of Kutuzov and Alexander Nevsky Regiment.

 

In 1989, the 67th Guards Tank Regiment of the division was reorganized into the 723rd Guards Motor Rifle Regiment.

The division was stationed in three settlements of Mecklenburg-Predpomerania (Neustrelitz, Ravensbrück and Wulkow) in seven military camps.

 

In 1991, the division included:

division management;

47th Guards Tank Uman-Pomeranian Order of Lenin, Order of the Red Banner, Orders of Suvorov, Kutuzov and Bogdan Khmelnitsky Regiment (Neustrelitz);

65th Guards Tank Sevsko-Pomeranian Order of Lenin, twice Red Banner, Orders of Suvorov, Kutuzov and Bogdan Khmelnitsky Regiment (Neustrelitz);

60th Red Banner Motorized Rifle Regiment, Order of Bogdan Khmelnitsky (Ravensbrück);

723rd Guards Motor Rifle Red Banner, Order of Suvorov Regiment (Ratenov);

724th Warsaw Guards Self-Propelled Artillery, Order of Alexander Nevsky Regiment (Neustrelitz);

66th Guards Anti-Aircraft Missile Lublin Orders of Kutuzov and Alexander Nevsky Regiment (Neustrelitz);

17th separate reconnaissance and electronic warfare battalion (Neustrelitz);

185th separate communications battalion (Neustrelitz);

135th separate engineer-sapper battalion (Neustrelitz);

541st separate chemical protection battalion;

1075th separate battalion of material support;

59th separate repair and restoration battalion;

192nd separate medical battalion.

 

The highlighted is interesting, it shows the process (later than I expected) to convert GSFG formations into 'defensive' organisations at the instruction of Gorbachev himself. The larger OOB of 2nd Guards Tank showed this happening in the rest of the divisions in the Army as well. There is no description ive yet seen of any TOE changes inside the Motor Rifle or Tank Regiments however.

 

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  • 3 weeks later...
  • 1 month later...

Detailed numbers of MiG-21 variants purchased during Cold War by Romanian AF (in Polish but easily tranlateable):

https://www.magnum-x.pl/artykul/pozegnanie-legendy-koniec-sluzby-rumunskich-mysliwcow-mig-21

Also numbers of MiG-23 and 29 available

Quote

Rumuńskie lotnictwo, w ciągu całego okresu służby myśliwców MiG-21 eksploatowało łącznie ponad 300 maszyn tego typu i to w różnych wariantach produkcyjnych. Pierwsze egzemplarze „ołówków”, jeszcze w wariancie MiG-21F-13, zostały dostarczone do Rumunii w październiku 1962 roku. 12 maszyn trafiło wówczas do 93. Pułku Myśliwskiego, stacjonującego w tym czasie w bazie w Giarmata. Kolejny tuzin samolotów w tej samej wersji dostarczono już w sierpniu 1963 roku do 57. Pułku Myśliwskiego rozlokowanego w pobliżu Konstancy. Służba wspomnianych maszyn zakończyła się w praktyce w 1976 roku, choć za stanu ewidencyjnego rumuńskiego lotnictwa formalnie samoloty te zostały spisane dopiero na początku lat 90. ubiegłego wieku. Dostawy kolejnego wariantu MiG-21 do Rumunii rozpoczęły się w 1965 roku. Wtedy to Forțele Aeriene Republicii Socialiste Române odebrało pierwsze egzemplarze z łącznie 38 samolotów nabytych w wersji PF, a więc już wyposażonej w radar RP-21. Maszyny otrzymały lokalne oznaczenie MiG-21RFM. Eksploatacja ostatnich z nich została zakończona również na początku lat 90.

Także w 1965 roku do Rumunii trafiły pierwsze egzemplarze dwumiejscowych wariantów MiG-21. Były to cztery samoloty w wersji MiG-21U izdielije 66-400, do których po pewnym czasie dołączyły trzy kolejne samoloty (izdielije 66-600).

Kolejnym wariantem MiG-21, który trafił do rumuńskiego lotnictwa był MiG-21PFM. Rozpoczęte w 1966 roku dostawy objęły zarówno standardowe samoloty tej wersji (izdielije94A), jak i dostosowane do przenoszenia bomb jądrowych (izdielije94N). Łącznie do rumuńskich jednostek trafiło 51 egzemplarzy MiGów-21PFM, które otrzymały lokalne oznaczenie MiG-21RFMM. Samoloty w tym wariancie pozostały w linii do 2002 roku. Kilka lat krócej potrwała natomiast eksploatacja rozpoznawczych MiGów-21R. 11 (lub 12) maszyn tego typu użytkowano bowiem pomiędzy 1968 a 1998 rokiem. Samoloty w tym wariancie otrzymały lokalne oznaczenie MiG-21C. W tym przypadku C pochodziło od rumuńskiego słowa „cercetare”, czyli rozpoznanie.

Począwszy od 1969 roku do rumuńskich pułków myśliwskich zaczęły trafiać MiGi-21M. Ogółem dostawy objęły 60 (wg innej wersji 68) maszyn tego typu. Ostatnie samoloty w tej wersji dostarczono we wrześniu 1970 roku. Część z nich została później objęta modernizacją do standardu LanceR. W tym samym roku rozpoczęto również do Rumunii dostawy 14 egzemplarzy dwumiejscowych MiGów-21US.

Ostatnim wariantem MiG-21, który trafił do Forțele Aeriene Române, były samoloty MiG-21MF (czyli izdielije 96). Pierwsze z nich dotarły do użytkownika w 1972 roku. Łącznie zaś dostarczono ich 71 (według innych danych 74) egzemplarzy. Przy czym wśród nich znalazły się zarówno samoloty wyprodukowane w Zakładach nr 30 w Moskwie-Chodynce, jak i maszyny, które opuściły linie produkcyjną Zakładów nr 21 w Gorki. Te ostatnie, dostarczane począwszy od 1975 roku otrzymały lokalne oznaczenie MiG-21MF-75 (wyróżniały się elementami wyposażenia kokpitu przejętymi z MiG-21bis).

W końcu, między 1972 i 1980 rokiem, siły powietrzne socjalistycznej Rumunii otrzymały także 31 egzemplarzy dwumiejscowych MiGów-21UM. Był to ostatni z wariantów MiGa-21, który trafił do rumuńskiej służby. Co ciekawe, wszystkie z eksploatowanych w Rumunii szkolno-bojowych wariantów MiG-21 otrzymały identyczne lokalne oznaczenie MiG-21DC. Rumuńskie Siły Powietrzne nie wykorzystywały nigdy MiGów-21bis.

W chwili upadku bloku wschodniego poza ponad 200 MiGami-21, rumuńskie siły powietrzne użytkowały również stosunkowo nieliczne MiGi-29 (począwszy od 1989 roku dostarczono 21 egzemplarzy) oraz MiGi-23 w wariantach MF oraz UB (łącznie do Rumuni trafiło 36 samolotów w wariancie jednomiejscowym oraz dziesięć dwumiejscowych UB). 

 

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  • 2 months later...

Question to Pavel Novak:

Do You have informations about exact number of planes and their specific types in Czechoslovak Air Forces and Air Defence forces (if possible detailed to regiments) in 1988-1989?

Say, what was the number of MiG-21MF, MA, bis, PF, PFM variants and where did the Su-22M4 go? 

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More Yugoslav plans:

Transport and auxiliary aviation:

- An-32 for An-26 replacement

- 3 ex-Canadian L-100-30 for heavy transport component (technical delegation was selected to be sent to Canada to organize pilot and mechanics training in february 1991, but never sent due the deteriorating situation in Yugoslavia)

- Mi-17, one or two squadrons to replace oldest Mi-8s (1968. production, 28 year lifetime would expire in 1996) as temporary measure unit until new helicopter was decided upon. Decision was expected to be done until mid-90s, production of new type starting in early 2000s. USSR offered joint production of improved Mi-17 (Mi-38), while France offered Puma. Due the good cooperation with France with Gazelle Puma was more likely, but for from certain.

- One or two Mi-26. Exact purpose of those is not really known, army did not have explicit need for them, so it is possible those were civilian purchase.

- Two further CL-215 firefighting planes (formally civilian purchase, but went through military acquisition process for some reason...).

Combat aviation:

- Integration of night sight (not specified which) into HN-42/45 Gazelle AT helos.

- Acquisition of 12 or 16 Mi-24VP. No further acquisition was planned, those would be concentrated in the single squadron in Nis.

- 4 additional Ka-28 and integration of Mk.46 torpedo to it

- Another 20 MiG-29s, probably 4 trainers and rest single seat. Existing 16 would be transfered to Bihac Zeljava air-base, while new ones would be stationed in Batajnica

- Modernization of MiG-21 with improved radar, BWR missiles etc. Basically same as Indian Bison upgrade.

- G-4M modernized trainer, adding PGM (AGM-65B/D) and AA (R-60) capability.

- J-22M modernization of J-22 attack plane. Inner hardpoint would be reinforced to 1000kg each (vs 750kg standard), stronger engines, it would get ability to carry targeting pod with LRF/LD and thermal sight on the centerline, PGMs would be AGM-65B/D and 250kg LGBs. It could also carry 2 x R-60 on two additional hardpoints. Israeli Elta ELL-8212 jammer pod was supposed to be carried on one of the R-60 hardpoints. Lockheed TFR pod would be available (it was approved for sale to Yugoslavia in 1990).

Recce version, IJ-22M was supposed to carry Vinten 880, 753A and  Vinten Linescan 401 recce pods, and VRTIO-VK /VRTIO-ZK automatic picture/video transfer system.

- Retirement of J-21 light attackers and G-2 trainers until 1999. All non modernized MiG-21s were supposed to be retired until end of 1999.

 

Navy:

- River artillery boat:

801nlUi.jpg

Armament would be 1 x 76mm (in PT-76 turret), 128/32 M77 launcher, 1 x AK-630 AA gun, up the 6 20/1mm M75 guns, ATGM launcher (aparently from retired 9P133 SP-ATGM). FC would be augmented by Giraffe radar and night sights for all armament except 20mm guns and ATGMs. Two units were planned.

- Novi Sad river minesweepers, improvement of existing Nestin class, with 30/2mm AA guns on front, and 20/4mm on the rear deck.

More later.

 

Edited by bojan
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On 4/29/2023 at 1:01 AM, bojan said:

- 122mm motorized howitzer - mid '90s. Basic 122mm D-30 on truck. For motorized brigades Further upgrades - automatic loading system - early 2000s. 26-27 motorized brigades would need 486 guns

Something along the lines of EVO-105?

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Pretty much. Further plans were to add autoloader. This project was rejuvenated in the early 2000s, then died again as there is no long-term interest to keep 122mm caliber outside 2S1s. This is more less how it would have looked. First version, "gun on truck" like EVO-105:

1920px-SORA_122mm.jpg

Version with 12 rounds autoloader:

SORA_122mm_2.jpg

152mm SPH project also started as "gun on truck", with intention to evolve to a full autoloader.

 

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Most plans are from the late '80s. Some of the timeline for introduction is from 1989. meeting os SSNO (state secretariat of people defense), rest is reconstructed talking with people involved. More-less, Yugoslav wars caught army in the midst of the largest reorganization since '50s.

4th gen fighter was on a very long stick, I am personally doubtful it would be finished, through there are people who know more about aviation who think it would have worked out in the end, even if timeline was optimistic as French for some reason were quite interested in share in "smaller Rafale" as export oriented project.

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On 8/25/2023 at 2:05 PM, Darth Stalin said:

Question to Pavel Novak:

Do You have informations about exact number of planes and their specific types in Czechoslovak Air Forces and Air Defence forces (if possible detailed to regiments) in 1988-1989?

Say, what was the number of MiG-21MF, MA, bis, PF, PFM variants and where did the Su-22M4 go? 

Web valka.cz has lists of individual aircrafts and information when they served in time but it is not complete and sometimes there are errors. I have made lists for some variants in which I was interested.

 

Su-22M4

50 delivered + 8 trainers Su-22UM3K

8 delivered in 1984-85 went to 47th Reconnaissance aviation regiment in Pardubice (these were in recon configuration)

12 delivered in 1987 went to 20th Fighter bomber aviation regiment in Namest nad Oslavou

12 delivered in 1988 went to 6th Fighter bomber aviation regiment in Prerov

18 delivered in 1989/90 went to 20th Fighter bomber aviation regiment in Namest nad Oslavou (one crashed in 1989)

The czech ones were mostly sold to Vietnam in 2000s. Some Slovak ended in Angola.

 

MiG-21PF

39 delivered in 1964-65

I think there were still 31 of them in 1989 and they were deployed in two squadrons in 8th Fighter aviation regiment in Brno (whole second squadron and half of third one which had also MiG-21F-13). Another squadron was in 9th Fighter aviation regiment in Bechyne (third squadron). But before the end of 1989 all were withdrawn from service.

 

MiG-21PFM

50 delivered in 1966-68

I think 38 were there in 1989 in three squadrons. Two in 11th Fighter aviation regiment in Zatec (second and third) and one in 8th Fighter aviation regiment in Brno (originally first squadron after but after delivery of MiG-21MF changed to second squadron).

 

MiG-21M (cs documentation botched its name hence one can find here its orignal name but also MiG-21M/A and finally MiG-21MA)

24 delivered in 1969-70

I think 20 were there in 1989 modernized to MF standard by this time. They were mixed with other MiG-21MF but most of them were in 4th Fighter aviation regiment in Pardubice (but this regiment was disbanded in July 1989) and 5th Fighter aviation regiment in Dobrany. Individual aircraft could have been moved to other units esspecially after the 4th Fighter disbandment.

 

MiG-21MF

102 delivered in 1971-75

I think 93 were there in 1989. Deployment through year 1989:

- 2 squadrons (second and third, first one had Su-22M4) in 6th Fighter bomber aviation regiment in Prerov 

- originally 1 squadron (the third one, first and second had MiG-23ML) in 1st Fighter aviation regiment in Plana but transferred to 8th Fighter aviation regiment in Brno (as 1st Fighter got MiG-23MF from 11th Fighter which got MiG-29 for its first squadron)

- originally 1 squadron in 4th Fighter (but regiment had also second squadron with "MA" and aircraft were mixed as after modernization they were practically same), after disbandement moved to 5th and 9th Fighter

- originally 1 squadron in 5th Fighter (but regiment had also second squadron with "MA" and aircraft were mixed as after modernization they were practically same), rearmed its third squadron with aircrafts from 4th Fighter

- originally 2 squadrons in 9th Fighter aviation regiment in Bechyne and rearmed its third squadron with aircrafts from 4th Fighter

 

MiG-21bis was not used by Czechoslovakia.

Edited by Pavel Novak
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For better view 1988 situation:

 

State Air Defence Command

 - 3rd State Air Defence Division

-- 1st Fighter Aviation Regiment (Plana) - 2x squadron MiG-23ML, 1x squadron MiG-21MF

// in 1989 rearmed third squadron to MiG-23MF

-- 11th Fighter Aviation Regiment (Zatec) - 1x squadron MiG-23MF, 2x squadron MiG-21PFM

// in 1989 rearmed first squadron to MiG-29

 - 2nd State Air Defence Division

-- 8th Fighter Aviation Regiment (Brno) - 1x squadron MiG-21PFM, 1x squadron MiG-21PF, 1x squadron mix of MiG-21PF and MiG-21F-13

// in 1989 rearmed first squadron to MiG-21MF, rearmed second squadron to MiG-21PFM, disbanded third squadron without replacement

 

Aviation Command

- 10th Aviation Army

-- 1st Fighter Aviation Division

--- 4th Fighter Aviation Regiment (Pardubice) - 2x squadron MiG-21MF/"MA", 1x squadron MiG-21F-13/FR

// in 1989 regiment disbanded

--- 5th Fighter Aviation Regiment (Dobrany) - 2x squadron MiG-21MF/"MA", 1x squadron MiG-21F-13/FR

// in 1989 rearmed third squadron to MiG-21MF/"MA"

--- 9th Fighter Aviation Regiment (Bechyne) - 1x squadron MiG-21MF, 1x squadron MiG-21PF, 1x squadron MiG-21F-13/FR

// during 1988 rearmed second squadron to MiG-21MF and third squadron to MiG-21PF

// in 1989 rearmed third squadron to MiG-21MF/"MA"

-- 34th Fighter Bomber Aviation Division

--- 6th Fighter Bomber Aviation Regiment (Prerov) - 3x squadron MiG-21MF

// during 1988 rearmed first squadron to Su-22M4

--- 20th Fighter Bomber Aviation Regiment (Namest nad Oslavou) - 1x squadron Su-22M4, 2x squadron Su-7BKL

// in 1989 rearmed second squadron to Su-22M4 and disbanded third squadron without replacement

--- 28th Fighter Bomber Aviation Regiment (Caslav) - 3x squadron MiG-23BN

--- 30th Assault Aviation Regiment (Pardubice) - 3x squadron Su-25K

-- 47th Reconnaissance Aviation Regiment (Hradec Kralove) - 1x squadron Su-22M4(R), 2x squadron MiG-21R, 2x squadron L-29R

// not sure here but may be MiG-21R squadrons and L-29R squadrons were merged

Edited by Pavel Novak
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