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KZ Presibdent Tokayev in his address to the nation announced he gave order to shoot terrorists to kill without warning, denied any possibility of talks 

Токаев дал приказ армии стрелять по террористам без предупреждения - Россия 24 - YouTube

Not surprising, CNN is blaming him for that

https://edition.cnn.com/2022/01/07/asia/kazakhstan-kassym-jomart-tokayev-address-intl/index.html

Edited by Roman Alymov
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1 hour ago, Roman Alymov said:

KZ Presibdent Tokayev in his address to the nation announced he gave order to shoot terrorists to kill without warning, denied any possibility of talks 

China just said it supports the Kazaki government, praises 'strong measures',

China's Xi Praises 'Strong Measures' Against Protesters In Kazakhstan: State Media | Barron's (barrons.com)

The lesson from Syria has been learned - move fast and decisively, don't fuck around talking.

Edited by glenn239
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10 minutes ago, glenn239 said:

China just said it supports the Kazaki government, praises 'strong measures',

China's Xi Praises 'Strong Measures' Against Protesters In Kazakhstan: State Media | Barron's (barrons.com)

The lesson from Syria has been learned - move fast and decisively, don't fuck around talking.

Never talk with criminals. Nice to see the government is on top of the situation and Russia and China are helping to stabilize the situation.

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9 minutes ago, glenn239 said:

The lesson from Syria has been learned - move fast and decisively, don't fuck around talking.

Well, i would call it "learning from international best practicies", no need to go as far as Syria

"They weren't protesters. Don't dare call them protesters. They were a riotous mob, insurrectionists, domestic terrorists. It's that basic. It's that simple,"(c) Not Assad....

https://www.nbcnews.com/politics/white-house/biden-slams-capitol-rioters-domestic-terrorists-don-t-dare-call-n1253335

 

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10 minutes ago, seahawk said:

Never talk with criminals. Nice to see the government is on top of the situation and Russia and China are helping to stabilize the situation.

The Chinese are sending a clear signal to Biden, I think.  Not just on Kazakhstan, but on Russia as well.

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6 hours ago, KV7 said:

This is usually true but Kazakhstan actually has by world standards exceptionally low income inequality, on par with Finland and Norway.

Yes, but with a GDP per capita that is 18% and 13% of Finland and Norway, meaning, everyone is equally poor.

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6 hours ago, Simon Tan said:

The problem as always is the ineffcient distribution of wealth. The very rich dont need the money they agglomerate. To be rich, and enjoy its trappings you must take out of the economic system. Reinvestment does not make your wife, mistress or boyfreind happy, nor impress your entourage.

In the US, a common thought is to get rich, or maintain riches by investment in companies that improve the economy, meaning the stock market. It has been alluded to here, many of the rich in Russia, and former soviet republics get their $$$ from their own countries then move to investments offshore, meaning the west. If so, instead of keeping the money in their own countries, even just sitting in idle bank accounts, has affected the poverty and stagnation of these countries. 

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Kazakh income distribution is opaque. A lot of it is off books and transacted offshore. This is something encountered by multiple acquaintances working in Kazakhstan.

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27 minutes ago, RETAC21 said:

Yes, but with a GDP per capita that is 18% and 13% of Finland and Norway, meaning, everyone is equally poor.

You need to look at the $PPP to assess living standards, and that is much higher at around $22 000 due to (and here is the big irony) low domestic prices, to some extent as expected due to the Balassa-Samuelson / Penn effect.

Edited by KV7
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21 minutes ago, Simon Tan said:

Kazakh income distribution is opaque. A lot of it is off books and transacted offshore. This is something encountered by multiple acquaintances working in Kazakhstan.

Right this is another reason for them to use progressive sales taxes, i.e. subsidies on basic goods and luxury taxes. If someone with no declared income front sup to buy a Mercedes then the tax system should essentially be assuming they are loaded, and this can be achieved by directly taxing the luxury goods that richer people tend to predominately consume. This would also be good for the terms of trade because such items are typically imported.

Edited by KV7
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1 hour ago, ex2cav said:

It has been alluded to here, many of the rich in Russia, and former soviet republics get their $$$ from their own countries then move to investments offshore, meaning the west.

And why?

Because in dictatorships there is no protection of property. If Russia had a truly independent judicial system the rich wouldn't go through the motions of parking their money abroad (or at least not more than necessary). But when you can lose your whole fortune over night because you happen to piss off the guy at the top, or the top dog decides to radically alter the lines of policy (or its enforcement level), you can never be sure of anything.

People are generally more averse to losing something than enticed by the chance of winning the same amount. Some may be willing to risk their lives in pursuit of a large fortune, but once that it's been acquired, invariably the motivation shifts towards protection against loss. The absence of a stable (legal) environment is the root cause why a country remains in poverty these days. With the rule of law comes prosperity.

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12 minutes ago, Ssnake said:

If Russia had a truly independent judicial system the rich wouldn't go through the motions of parking their money abroad (or at least not more than necessary). But when you can lose your whole fortune over night because you happen to piss off the guy at the top, or the top dog decides to radically alter the lines of policy (or its enforcement level), you can never be sure of anything.

Former Trump adviser Michael Flynn faces $5 million in legal fees amid pardon buzz: Source - ABC News (go.com)

 

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17 minutes ago, Ssnake said:

And why?

Because in dictatorships there is no protection of property. If Russia had a truly independent judicial system the rich wouldn't go through the motions of parking their money abroad (or at least not more than necessary).

I’m afraid there is important word missing in your sentence. It should really be “Because in dictatorships there is no protection of STOLEN property.” We all know how this money and assets were obtained by people who own them now. If Russia had a truly independent judicial system the rich wouldn't go through the motions of parking their money abroad for good reason– waste majority of them would be already in Russian jail where they belongs to. But even with all misperfections  of  our legal system, this people know that sooner or later they would have to run abroad or go to jail, so they are moving their assets and families to regions where laundering  of dirty money obtained in colonies are centuries-old tradition and where army of legal professionals ready to serve them (on handsome pay, of course)  

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7 minutes ago, Roman Alymov said:

I’m afraid there is important word missing in your sentence. It should really be “Because in dictatorships there is no protection of STOLEN property.” We all know how this money and assets were obtained by people who own them now. If Russia had a truly independent judicial system the rich wouldn't go through the motions of parking their money abroad for good reason– waste majority of them would be already in Russian jail where they belongs to. But even with all misperfections  of  our legal system, this people know that sooner or later they would have to run abroad or go to jail, so they are moving their assets and families to regions where laundering  of dirty money obtained in colonies are centuries-old tradition and where army of legal professionals ready to serve them (on handsome pay, of course)  

Stolen money is very well protected in Russia, as long as you stay on Putin's good side. The point is, Putin and his gang can at any given moment redefine what's stolen. When you have an economy transition where pretty much everything is being stolen, but only a handful of the thieves face consequences, and they all happen to be the ones opposing Putin ... well, the conclusions are pretty much obvious to anybody willing to face the facts.

Even those who are on Putin's side can never be entirely certain if they will stay there despite their own best efforts, and even if they remain considered loyal to the end, one day Putin will be gone and who knows who's going to replace him. That's the latest moment when the thieves around him need a bolt hole abroad.

Stolen money isn't protected where there's rule of law. It might take longer to pry it from the thieves, but eventually it happens too.

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28 minutes ago, Ssnake said:

Stolen money is very well protected in Russia, as long as you stay on Putin's good side. The point is, Putin and his gang can at any given moment redefine what's stolen. When you have an economy transition where pretty much everything is being stolen, but only a handful of the thieves face consequences, and they all happen to be the ones opposing Putin ... well, the conclusions are pretty much obvious to anybody willing to face the facts.

Even those who are on Putin's side can never be entirely certain if they will stay there despite their own best efforts, and even if they remain considered loyal to the end, one day Putin will be gone and who knows who's going to replace him. That's the latest moment when the thieves around him need a bolt hole abroad.

Stolen money isn't protected where there's rule of law. It might take longer to pry it from the thieves, but eventually it happens too.

Well, leaving aside your obsession with Putin, nice to see you admit that assets you claim are seeking legal protection in Western safe havens are in fact stolen from Russian people. Isn’t it the real reason to seek refuge away from Russia, not some moral and legal high grounds as you claim? :)

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Another Yandex-translation 

On the fourth day after the beginning of the events in Kazakhstan (if counted from January 4), one can observe a broad international reaction to them. What can be noted in this regard?
Firstly, China's position expressed in support of the Kazakh authorities, which focuses on external interference that caused the events that took place. Thus, Moscow and Beijing presented a united front.
Secondly, the long silence of Turkey. Only after a long pause, it was decided to hold an online summit of the Organization of Turkic States on January 11.
Ankara does not want to spoil relations with Kazakhstan, but would like, for obvious reasons, to become a participant in the settlement of the situation. The introduction of the CSTO contingent blocked such an opportunity for it, clearly demonstrating the limits of Turkish influence: in fact, there are only two first-line players in Central Asia - Russia and China.
Thirdly, the West has "woken up". The United States is formulating its position very cautiously, not wanting to burn bridges in relations with Kazakhstan, as they are trying to preserve the opportunity to replay the situation in their favor in the future.
At the same time, Washington has clearly launched a media campaign aimed at discrediting the CSTO mission, which is called a Russian military operation to put Kazakhstan under control. Approximately the same position is held by the United Kingdom.
Fourth, the position of the European Union. It is more aggressive towards the Kazakh authorities. German Justice Minister Marko Bushman generally stated that Kazakhstan "has left the circle of civilized countries." But there is no really hard criticism from the EU yet either.
The United States, Great Britain and the leaders of the European Union are well aware that they cannot do much in the current situation. Because the situation in Almaty can no longer be called peaceful protests, and President Tokayev's official appeal to the CSTO is absolutely legitimate. Therefore, it will be hot on the information track, but no fires are expected in the field of diplomacy yet.
In general, the United States and NATO countries are gradually switching to negotiations on security guarantees and are already making their first public statements outlining their negotiating position. Thus, if the operation of the law enforcement agencies of Kazakhstan in Almaty does not drag on, this topic will gradually fade into the background in international information support.

 

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