Jump to content

Pirates, german pirates


Recommended Posts

Everyday one learns something new....

"October the 12th is a holiday or the National Holiday in a large number of American countries, Italy and Spain. 529 years years ago, the first discovery voyage of Christopher Columbus reached the shores of the island of Guanahani, most certainly part of what today are the Bahamas. This voyage was to create a permanent link between Europe and that what was later recognized as the American continent. This shaped in many ways the world as we know it today.
Browsing our archives for material related to Spain to post today, we found this late 19th Century print made from a work of the renown German painter Hans von Bartels (1856-1913). It depicts the first ever naval battle fought by a German navy and a Spanish victory: The Battle of Cape Saint Vincent of 1681 - mistakenly dated 1680 in the print, and not to be mistaken with the battle that took place on the same spot in 1797 during the French revolutionary Wars.
During the Franco-Dutch War (1672-1678), Spain had contracted a bebt with their allies of Brandenburg-Prussia. The expenses of the conflict did not allowed for the Spanish Crown to repay it, so the Navy of Brandenburg was sent to raid Spanish ships in 1680. A first success was the capture of the Spanish frigate Carolus Secundus off the Flemish city of Ostend. The ship was renamed Markgraf von Brandenburg and sent in a further expedition hoping to raid a convoy of the Spanish Treasure Fleet, returning to the Americas. On September the 30th 1681, off Cape Saint Vincent, Portugal, they spotted what they thought was their objective and set for attack. But the masts the had seen were actually those of a fleet Spain had set up to fight off the piracy from Brandenburg. After two hours of battle, severely outnumbered and outgunned having 10 sailors lost and 30 wounded, the Brandenburg fleet retreated to the Port of Lagos for repairs before returning to the Baltic. By that time, the Spanish Treasure Fleet was safely arriving to Cadiz. 
While this battle was a serious geopolitical and naval setback for Brandenburg, it stayed but an anecdote in Spanish history. So much so, that there are no sources mentioning any losses in the Spanish side."

Puede ser arte

Link to comment
Share on other sites

There was a very interesting podcast I was listening to some months about, about a British pirate expedition to the Persian Gulf of all places. The Captain escaped the law, and according to one legend was believed to have settled down in Devon as a Parson IIRC. One of the inspirations for 'Dr Syn, Alia's the scarcrow' and the if anything superior 'Captain Clegg' starring Peter Cushing.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Captain_Clegg_(film)

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

10 hours ago, Stuart Galbraith said:

There was a very interesting podcast I was listening to some months about, about a British pirate expedition to the Persian Gulf of all places. The Captain escaped the law, and according to one legend was believed to have settled down in Devon as a Parson IIRC. One of the inspirations for 'Dr Syn, Alia's the scarcrow' and the if anything superior 'Captain Clegg' starring Peter Cushing.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Captain_Clegg_(film)

 

Ah, the Pirate Round: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pirate_Round and Captain Tew: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pirate_Round

Link to comment
Share on other sites

On 11/5/2021 at 8:59 PM, Stuart Galbraith said:

Ive got a feeling the one in thinking of was Henry Avery (and I'm thinking of the wrong ocean), but thanks, that was a new one on me with a very similar career.

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Henry_Every

Yes, you are right, I was thinking about that guy too.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
 Share

×
×
  • Create New...