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Authoritarism in Hungary and Poland


Mikel2

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But then if you go and buy a hamburger in grill kiosk, at least over here you will get some variation of something that's very dense, relatively thin, but still thicker than a smash burger, and between the bun is stuffed a bit of absolutely everything: typically something like chopped lettuce, pepperoncini, onion, relish, tomato slices, cucumber slices, mustard, ketchup, ...

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5 minutes ago, Harold Jones said:

I'm pretty minimal on burgers, cheese, onions and mustard does it for toppings.  Everything else just seems to make it difficult to eat, either by sliding around or making the bun soggy, or both.

 

Mustard goes on hotdogs, NOT burgers.

Green and yellow relish goes good on burgers.

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7 hours ago, Stuart Galbraith said:

Thats actually quite a clever image. You either say Gay Nazi flag, or you see new Gay Woke Flag repeated 4 times, presumably depending on your life experience.

 

Oh dear Stuart. You've committed an arrest-able offense!

 

If someone was offended you could be arrested and charged. 

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6 hours ago, bd1 said:

in the past such creatures joined churches, in USA they join Home Owners Association, etc., etc.

HOA presidents are people for whom the Nazis were blase' and too tolerant.

 

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President of Hungary had an audience with the Pope. He congratulated her:

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And this is not our inference, but the confirmation of Novák herself: «During my audience the Holy Father was particularly interested in the politics of the Hungarian family. He welcomed the fact that the number of marriages has doubled and that abortions have halved in Hungary. The Holy Father thanked us for defending traditional families and persecuted Christians ». 

Badly, google translated source, from Italian.

There is still hope.

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Zimbabwe's 'Patriotic Bill' outlaws criticism of government before election

Reuters

June 1, 2023 12:29 PM GMT+2 Updated 3 days ago

HARARE, June 1 (Reuters) - Zimbabwe's parliament has outlawed criticism of the government ahead of presidential and parliamentary elections in August, with violations of a new law punishable by up to 20 years in jail.

The Criminal Law Code Amendment Bill, widely known as the "Patriotic Bill", contains a clause that criminalises "wilfully damaging the sovereignty and national interest of Zimbabwe".

Opposition activists said the law, passed late on Wednesday, was designed to punish citizens, civil society organisations and political adversaries of the ruling ZANU-PF party.

It has raised fears that the government could launch a crackdown on dissent ahead of the general election on Aug. 23, where President Emmerson Mnangagwa will be seeking a second term.

The 80-year-old's main rival is lawyer and pastor Nelson Chamisa, 45, who leads the newly formed Citizens Coalition for Change (CCC).

CCC spokesperson and lawyer, Fadzayi Mahere, described the law as "dangerous" and said it aimed at closing the democratic space ahead of elections.

[...]

https://www.reuters.com/world/africa/zimbabwes-patriotic-bill-outlaws-criticism-government-before-election-2023-06-01/

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Coincidentally, Zimbabwe is entering the CBDC sweepstakes. I'll give them props for pegging their CBDC to gold rather than fiat, as seems to be the plan here in Uhmerica. 

 

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Aaargh, wrong country trying to ban opposition before upcoming elections. I could say that we have had random posts about non-topical nations in this thread before, but to be honest I was rather hungover this morning when I posted that. 😬

Intended post, now with follow-up:

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Polish president proposes overhaul of Russian influence law days after signing it

JUN 2, 2023

President Andrzej Duda has proposed major changes to legislation that he signed into law only four days ago creating a commission to investigate Russian influence.

His U-turn follows expressions of concern from the United States and European Union that the commission could be used for political purposes by the ruling party against the opposition during this year’s election campaign. A wide range of legal experts in Poland have also warned that the legislation is unconstitutional.

The amendments the president has proposed, which he said will be submitted to parliament today, would significantly reduce the powers of the commission – including removing its ability to ban people from holding public office – and change how its decisions can be appealed.

Duda’s proposal contains three elements. First, he wants to withdraw the commission’s ability to punish those deemed to have acted under Russian influence by banning them from office, from receiving clearance to access confidential information, and from owning weapons.

Instead, Duda wants the commission to be able to issue a “statement that a person who was found to have acted under Russian influence cannot guarantee the proper performance of activities in the public interest”.

Second, Duda wants to change the way in which people can appeal against decisions issued by the commission. Instead of going through the administrative court system, appeals would be made through common courts.

Moreover, appeals would be dealt with by a court in the person’s place of residence, rather than by the court of appeal in Warsaw (which is led by a judge seen as close to the government).

Finally, the president wants the law to specify that members of the commission could not be sitting members of parliament. This is attended to address concerns that the body would be politicised.

However, given that the legislation would still, as it does now, empower the lower house of parliament, the Sejm, where the government has a majority, to choose the members of the commission, there will remain concerns from the opposition that the body would be filled with political appointees.

Additionally, Duda said he would like the commission to function more transparently, in particular by making its hearings public apart from in cases where they deal with highly sensitive information.

[...]

Duda’s decision marks a sudden and dramatic about-turn on legislation that he has this week been defending.

He told Bloomberg on Tuesday, for example, that he “doesn’t quite understand” criticism of the law from Washington and Brussels, which he suggested may stem result from misinformation spread by the opposition or misunderstandings based on bad translations.

Today’s announcement by the president was widely mocked by opposition politicians. Duda has effectively “vetoed his own signature”, tweeted Szymon Hołownia, leader of Poland 2050 (Polska 2050). He added that parliament will now have to “choose between the president’s opinion on Monday or the one from Friday”.

Hołownia, however, said that he still favours scrapping the law creating the commission entirely, a position also supported today by Władysław Kominiak-Kamysz, leader of the Polish People’s Party (PSL), which is allied with Poland 2050.

Tomasz Trela, a leading figure from another opposition group, The Left (Lewica), called the situation a “circus”.

Małgorzata Kidawa-Błońska, a deputy leader of Civic Platform (PO), the largest opposition group, asked: “Does the president even read what he signs?”

[...]

https://notesfrompoland.com/2023/06/02/polish-president-proposes-overhaul-of-russian-influence-law-days-after-signing/

 

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Polish opposition supporters mark 1989 Solidarity win

Reuters

June 4, 2023 4:00 PM GMT+2 Updated 2 hours ago

WARSAW, June 4 (Reuters) - Hundreds of thousands of protesters gathered in Warsaw on Sunday, the 34th anniversary of Poland's first postwar democratic election, for a march the liberal opposition has billed as a test of its ability to end nearly eight years of nationalist rule later this year.

Crowds stretching for at least a mile marched with banners reading "Free, European Poland", "European Union yes, PiS no", referring to the governing Law and Justice (PiS) party.

Some held masks of ruling party leader Jaroslaw Kaczynski that had the word "shame" written on them. Half a million people were marching, according to organizers. Police and city officials did not give an estimate. Thousands also marched in other Polish cities and towns.

"I took part in many marches, but I've never seen a protest of this size with such energy, I feel this is a breakthrough like June 4, 1989 was," Jacek Gwozdz, 51, an IT specialist from Nowy Sacz, said in Warsaw.

Opinion polls show an election due after the summer will be closely fought, with Russia's war in neighbouring Ukraine giving a boost to the Law and Justice (PiS) government which has emerged as a leading voice against the Kremlin in Europe.

The opposition has struggled to galvanise support despite widespread criticism at home and abroad of the PiS, which has been accused of eroding the rule of law, turning state media into a government mouthpiece and endorsing homophobia.

[...]

In June 1989, a partially free vote handed victory to a government led by the Solidarity trade union and triggered a series of events culminating in the fall of the Berlin Wall that November.

On Sunday, hundreds of buses arrived in Warsaw to bring opposition supporters from across the country. Some said they were motivated by a row over legislation proposed by PiS to weed out undue Russian influence from the country.

The opposition sees the legislation as a government attempt to launch a witchhunt against political opponents.

In an unexpected turnaround, President Andrzej Duda, a PiS ally, said on Friday he would propose amendments to the law, which has also drawn criticism from lawyers, as well as the United States and the European Commission.

[...]

https://www.reuters.com/world/europe/polish-opposition-supporters-seeking-change-mark-1989-solidarity-win-2023-06-04/

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5 minutes ago, BansheeOne said:

Aaargh, wrong country trying to ban opposition before upcoming elections. I could say that we have had random posts about non-topical nations in this thread before, but to be honest I was rather hungover this morning when I posted that. 😬

 

We all understood you were subtlely accusing Poland of planning to colonize Zimbabwe, understandable given all the ethnic and cultural parallels.

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1 hour ago, Ivanhoe said:

 

We all understood you were subtlely accusing Poland of planning to colonize Zimbabwe, understandable given all the ethnic and cultural parallels.

Ukraine is not very democratic at the moment, either.

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4 hours ago, sunday said:

Ukraine is not very democratic at the moment, either.

Why would a European country with mediocre weather want to conquer another European country with mediocre weather? 

At least Plan Zimbageddon would have the Polish Army getting some sun...

 

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4 hours ago, Ivanhoe said:

Why would a European country with mediocre weather want to conquer another European country with mediocre weather? 

At least Plan Zimbageddon would have the Polish Army getting some sun...

 

Because Russia!!!, of course.

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Scotland

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It’s hardly the kind of behaviour one would expect from bosses in charge of health provision in Scotland’s largest city: the health board for NHS Greater Glasgow and Clyde (NHSGGC) has admitted paying a private company to monitor the social media activities of a Scottish woman whose husband died at a scandal-hit hospital.

Louise Slorance’s husband Andrew died two years ago while being treated for Mantle Cell Lymphoma at the Queen Elizabeth University Hospital (QEUH). The father of five contracted Covid while in hospital but was also infected by Aspergillus, a fact Louise was not aware of until after her husband’s death. She has since been a fierce critic of the hospital and those who run it.

The hospital is now undergoing an inquiry into whether its construction led to the infection and deaths of multiple patients. It has now been revealed that Ms Slorance was targeted by the NHSGGC’s “social listening” programme monitoring social media posts, although the justification behind the targeting and the public cost of contracting out the activity to the private sector remain opaque.

First things first: many social media posts are public domain and there is no law against viewing public statements. But the very fact that a large public sector organisation – part of the NHS, no less – is employing a private company to keep an eye on the bereaved relative of a man who died in its care is a shocking revelation.

How was this information used by the health board? How much did it cost ordinary tax-payers? And what does it say about the political culture of modern Scotland that such activities can be exposed without so much as an apology or explanation for this intrusion?

 

https://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/2023/06/05/the-snps-sinister-paranoia-now-rules-in-scotland/

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United Kingdom Tyranny is spreading

 

 

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On Monday afternoon my solicitor received a bizarre communication from Surrey police solicitors. He thought it had to do with my civil claim against them.

After some miscommunication, they sent through a bundle for a court hearing.

I am due in court tomorrow morning.

The police asked that “physical paperwork” relating to the court hearing against me in 2 days, was withheld from me.

They wanted me to go to a court hearing without access to the accusations and alleged evidence.

Surrey police have applied for a stalking protection order as a result of material I have posted on Twitter.

On page 1 of the bundle repeated misgendering is cited.

Here are the prohibitions they are seeking tomorrow morning.

I will be assigned an “offender manager”.

I will not be allowed to use any Social Media, Social Networking, Gaming, Dating (lol) site without this person’s written permission and having supplied them with usernames and passwords for all sites within 3 days.

In addition the following requirements are added:

1. Allow Police Officers to enter your registered address(es), between the hours of 8am and 8pm, to conduct a risk assessment, monitor devices, and manage compliance of the order

2. Provide your Offender Manager with any mobile, digital, or internet enabled devices for examination, review, and monitoring purposes, immediately upon request. You must also your provide your Offender Manager with any access PINs, passwords, or patterns. Examinations may be completed manually on scene, or could entail them seizing your device(s) for examination by agencies contracted by the police for that purpose. Failing to disclose the existence of a device in your possession to your Offender Manager will count as a failure to comply with this condition.

3. Re-register home address every 12 months at a Police Station (within 365 days of last registration).

4. Provide your Offender Manager with list of all mobile, digital, or internet enabled devices that you own or have access to use. The list must be provided within three days of the order being granted or within three days of any changes.

The police officer says this:

I believe that while presenting a significant interference with the respondent’s privacy rights, it is an appropriate course of action in the circumstances.

Signed by Surrey Police Superintendent

“I consider that in accordance with paragraph 2 of Article 8 of HRA, an interference by this force as a public authority is in accordance with the law and is necessary.”

I left out another condition Surrey police are asking for.

5. Possessing, owning or using more than one mobile phone and one SIM card, unless with written permission from your Offender Manager in the area that you reside. You must provide the telephone number and unique identifying numbers of all device(s) within three days of this order being granted or within three days of and supplying any changes within 3 days of any such change.

 

https://www.samizdata.net/2023/06/but-i-think-what-is-happening-to-me-is-important/

https://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-11282263/Moment-police-swoop-house-devout-catholic-mother-malicious-online-posts.html

Quote

Moment police 'with no search warrant' swooped on house of gender-critical Catholic mother and arrested her in front of her four children over 'series of anonymous posts on internet chat board'

 

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