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The missing Iowas and the Montanas


RETAC21
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On 9/8/2021 at 7:39 PM, R011 said:

The USN likely wanted to replace the fifteen old 1910s and'20s vintage battleships with which they started the war.  They had completed ten new ones and two more would bring that up to twelve.  As time went in and budgets shrank, they seem to have decided they could make do with ten, especially as the Soviets had only one useful dreadnought in service.

Potential threat of Soviet dreadnoughts, however, was probably bigger motivation for keeping battleships and even completing new ones than any hypothetical British threat. After all, Stalin was a big battleship fanboi, before the war broke out USSR planned no less than 14 large, fast battleships. After the war he still envisioned new battleship and battlecruiser classes and construction of Stalingrads were indeed well underway when he died.

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10 hours ago, Yama said:

Potential threat of Soviet dreadnoughts, however, was probably bigger motivation for keeping battleships and even completing new ones than any hypothetical British threat. After all, Stalin was a big battleship fanboi, before the war broke out USSR planned no less than 14 large, fast battleships. After the war he still envisioned new battleship and battlecruiser classes and construction of Stalingrads were indeed well underway when he died.

Disagree. inclement weather and night time surface ship attacks -- though radar and escorting ships made this less likely than before -- was a motivation to keep the Iowa's around. There were, A.F.A.I.K., no indications that the U.S.N. knew the Soviets were completing capital ships and if they did had virtually no need to worry about it. 

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USN certainly knew of the pre-war fleet plan (an American design was even considered at one point). USN could not have known Soviets' immediate fleet designs after the war (because Soviets themselves did not know, first new fleet plan was in 1947 iirc) but they would have been aware of Stalin's battleship ambitions. Stalin actually wanted to complete one of the Project 23 battleships after the war, but others managed to convince him it was impractical.

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15 hours ago, Yama said:

USN certainly knew of the pre-war fleet plan (an American design was even considered at one point). Evidence to support this is? Italy was a larger influence than the U.S. on Soviet battleships.

USN could not have known Soviets' immediate fleet designs after the war (because Soviets themselves did not know, first new fleet plan was in 1947 iirc) but they would have been aware of Stalin's battleship ambitions. Evidence to support this is?

Stalin actually wanted to complete one of the Project 23 battleships after the war, but others managed to convince him it was impractical.

https://naval-encyclopedia.com/ww2/soviet/sovetsky-soyuz-class-battleships.php

 

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Well no, other than that the battleships were not a secret: as I said, Soviets considered US designs along with Italian ones, and the battleship project is mentioned in contemporary Janes Fighting Ships. Although before the war they were thought to be 35kton ships, which was indeed the original plan. Final design would have triggered the Washington escalator clause had it not become irrelevant already.

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