Jump to content

French unit designations


Sikkiyn
 Share

Recommended Posts

Noticed interesting unit identifiers, er ir re reme ,and attempted to Google search their meanings, never getting a definitive result, only vowels.

Do the more learne-ed at this 'grate site' have more to help bring meaning to these?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

9 minutes ago, wendist said:

You have to be really, really secure in your manhood to have that kind of symbol for your unit.

They don't. 🤣😋

280px-Insigne_r%C3%A9gimentaire_du_1er_r

Link to comment
Share on other sites

2 hours ago, wendist said:

OK so they go with unicorns instead, how secure do you have to be to go with that?😎

It could have been worse, some country could have chosen a French general as the founder of a new dynasty... 😜

Edited by sunday
Link to comment
Share on other sites

2 hours ago, sunday said:

It could have been worse, some country could have chosen a French general as the founder of a new dynasty... 😜

Or a Dutch general to end one.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

7 hours ago, sunday said:

It could have been worse, some country could have chosen a French general as the founder of a new dynasty... 😜

No no no no no no don't you pick on that french dude, he was awesome. And don't you pick on those guys that picked him to be King of Sweden because they were awesome too (they were awesome mainly because they picked that french dude to be King of Sweden). He is one of the best kings Sweden has ever had. He realised better than any of the locals that it was seriously counterproductive (and damn near suicidal) for Sweden to continue to fight wars with Russia (perhaps Napoleon also should have paid attention). He managed somehow to be chosen as head of the Northern Army in the 1813 campaign against Napoleon and did a decent job leading that army. And while everybody else were heading for France to finish the Republic he took his Swedish troops north and cut the Danes down to size, effectively neutralising Denmark and Norway as a threat to Sweden. That is some journey, to start out as a young revolutionary then end his days an old man in the bedchamber of a royal palace.

On top of everything else the dude's great, great, great.... grandson is still the King of Sweden. That french dude was so awesome he could have used a unicorn in his seal and gotten away with it.😁

All IMHO of course.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

1 hour ago, wendist said:

No no no no no no don't you pick on that french dude, he was awesome. And don't you pick on those guys that picked him to be King of Sweden because they were awesome too (they were awesome mainly because they picked that french dude to be King of Sweden). He is one of the best kings Sweden has ever had. He realised better than any of the locals that it was seriously counterproductive (and damn near suicidal) for Sweden to continue to fight wars with Russia (perhaps Napoleon also should have paid attention). He managed somehow to be chosen as head of the Northern Army in the 1813 campaign against Napoleon and did a decent job leading that army. And while everybody else were heading for France to finish the Republic he took his Swedish troops north and cut the Danes down to size, effectively neutralising Denmark and Norway as a threat to Sweden. That is some journey, to start out as a young revolutionary then end his days an old man in the bedchamber of a royal palace.

On top of everything else the dude's great, great, great.... grandson is still the King of Sweden. That french dude was so awesome he could have used a unicorn in his seal and gotten away with it.😁

All IMHO of course.

Well, looked that way, it worked better than the change of dynasties of Spain during the 18th century to get the Bourbons! 😄

Link to comment
Share on other sites

3 hours ago, sunday said:

Well, looked that way, it worked better than the change of dynasties of Spain during the 18th century to get the Bourbons! 😄

It should be noted that ova'here we managed to do the same path in the reverse, we could have got Napoleon's older, quite competent brother as King, but preferred to go back to the depraved kid that tried to kick out his father and then spent the war trying to get Napoleon's attention, to then fuck the country for a further 30 years, ending with a civil war.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

12 minutes ago, RETAC21 said:

It should be noted that ova'here we managed to do the same path in the reverse, we could have got Napoleon's older, quite competent brother as King, but preferred to go back to the depraved kid that tried to kick out his father and then spent the war trying to get Napoleon's attention, to then fuck the country for a further 30 years, ending with a civil war.

Of course. King Joseph was an King imposed by Napoleon, there was no Spanish Felon King in living memory*, and people do not wreck their country by means of a costly guerilla war only to accept a King put by an invader army. You could say that England put a Hannover king in the throne, but at least that was the option of a substantial part of society, the Whigs. There was no popular support for Joseph, out of some elites in love with the spirit of the French revolution, and even part of those went against the French, giving birth to political Liberalism.

*Now there is one.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

8 hours ago, BansheeOne said:

You guys can laugh all you want, but if Napoleon had airdropped a regiment of parachute hussars from Montgolfieres into Wellington's back, you'd all be speaking French!

He'd just deploy his KGL Falschirmjaeger reserves to deal with them.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

3 hours ago, sunday said:

Of course. King Joseph was an King imposed by Napoleon, there was no Spanish Felon King in living memory*, and people do not wreck their country by means of a costly guerilla war only to accept a King put by an invader army. You could say that England put a Hannover king in the throne, but at least that was the option of a substantial part of society, the Whigs. There was no popular support for Joseph, out of some elites in love with the spirit of the French revolution, and even part of those went against the French, giving birth to political Liberalism.

*Now there is one.

Yes, that's the tragedy, that there wasn't crystal ball around.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

3 minutes ago, RETAC21 said:

Yes, that's the tragedy, that there wasn't crystal ball around.

There is another aspect, I think. Most of Spanish elites at the time were quite admiring of French fashions, ideas, and the like, continuing a trend that was by then about a century old, but the lower people were not. Thus, the elites were perfectly happy with Spain being a satellite of France, and they accepted Joseph as king without practical opposition. This is one of the thesis of Roca-Barea.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

1 minute ago, sunday said:

There is another aspect, I think. Most of Spanish elites at the time were quite admiring of French fashions, ideas, and the like, continuing a trend that was by then about a century old, but the lower people were not. Thus, the elites were perfectly happy with Spain being a satellite of France, and they accepted Joseph as king without practical opposition. This is one of the thesis of Roca-Barea.

I would wager also that it would have been accepted if the country had not been invaded by French troops that then proceeded to act like barbarians and to desecrate the churches in the name of revolution. The King and the Prince of Asturias were stupid enough by themselves to hand over the country without invasion.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

16 hours ago, R011 said:

He'd just deploy his KGL Falschirmjaeger reserves to deal with them.

You know, I should really stop making outlandish-seeming suggestions which upon a closer look are at least not impossible.

Quote

The First Parachute Jump. October 22, 1797.

By Marisa Ollero on 22 October, 2020

By the dawn of the 19th century, ballooning had become a staple of popular culture. No féte or celebration was complete without at least one ascent. Aeronauts, both male and female, rose majestically from pleasure grounds and gardens all over Europe. Tivoli Gardens in Paris, was one of the most popular spots for this entertainment and soon became the playground of the “flying” Garnerin family.

Andre-Jacques Garnerin was the greatest French aeronaut to follow J.P. Blanchard, and during his aerostatic career he was accompanied and abetted by his wife Jeanne-Genevieve (the first woman parachutist, 1798) and niece Elisa (who learned to fly balloons at age 15 and became the first professional parachutist, making 39 parachute descents from 1815 to 1836).

Garnerin had made his first balloon ascent from Metz in 1787, but the French Revolution interrupted his career. “Citizen Garnerin” joined the army on the Northern front and was taken prisoner by the English during the Napoleonic War. They handed him over to the Austrians who then imprisoned him in the fortress of Buda, in Hungary for nearly 3 years.

Garnerin had heard of Blanchard’s experiments with parachutes, and during his long confinement he contemplated constructing such a device and using it to escape from the fortress prison. He never had to opportunity to put this dream into execution, but resolved to make a parachute jump when he gained his liberty.

After his release, Garnerin returned to Paris where he resumed his aeronautical career and embarked on a bold experiment, which culminated in the first parachute jump, at the park of Monceau on October 22, 1797. After rising in his aerostatic balloon to a height of 3,000 ft., Garnerin climbed into a detachable gondola, then released it and began to plummet before his “parasol” shaped canopy opened–fluttering and oscillating unstably toward the ground. Garnerin landed roughly, sustaining a sprained ankle upon impact — but the descent had been a success.

In 1798, Garnerin repeated his parachuting feat at Tivoli Gardens in Paris, after making some much needed design changes in his 30 ft in diameter “parasol”, which helped to provide a smoother descent. He performed numerous others parachute descents in the next few years, aided and abetted by his wife and niece. In 1802, during the short peace between England and France, Garnerin came to England and made a number of balloon ascents from Vauxhaull and Chelsea Gardens in London and other locations around the country. During an ascent in London on August 3, 1802, in preparation for his next jump, Garnerin released a small parachute with a kitten suspended beneath. The parachute floated gently to earth, without the kitten having to spend one of its nine lives.

On September 21, 1802, Garnerin repeated his history making parachute descent; this time over London, taking off from the Volunteer Ground, Grosvenor Square. After reaching a height of almost 10,000 feet, he climbed into his parachute car and cut the suspension cord. The flight was extremely violent, owing to the brisk air currents, and Garnerin was battered to and fro by the wind. The sight was so frightening to spectators on the ground that they feared the worst for poor Garnerin, expecting that the parachute would collapse or that he would be flung out of the car.

As he swung out of sight, the crowd rushed toward the field near St. Pancras where Garnerin was seen to fall. There they found him bruised and dizzy from the motion of the car, but otherwise in good spirits. Two of the first well-wishers to arrive were the Duke of York and Lord Stanhope who heartily greeted the daring para-naut. A contemporary street ballad commemorates the event:

Bold Garnerin went up
Which increased his Repute
And came safe to earth
In his Grand Parachute.

While the Garnerins were touring Britain, the Napoleonic war erupted again and the family packed up their ballooning apparatus and left for the Continent to continue their grand aerial feats. From 1798 to 1812, Garnerin’s wife, Jeanne-Genevieve made numerous ascents in cities throughout Europe; several of these being accompanied by a parachute descent which thrilled the cheering crowds. She had been the first woman to descend in a parachute, performing that feat in 1798, at the age of 19. In 1799 she further added to her fame by becoming the first woman to “solo” in an aerostatic balloon.

During the early part of the 19th century, A. J. Garnerin was Napoleon’s official arranger of aeronautic fétes and Madame Garnerin’s unofficial title became “Aerostiere des Fétes Publiques”. By 1815, Garnerin’s niece, Mademoiselle Elisabeth Garnerin, had become an accomplished balloonist, and in that same year she performed her first parachute descent.

The Garnerins made a return trip to England towards the end of the Napoleonic war and a handbill describes their impending performance with Elisabeth descending in a parachute at The Theatre Royal, Covent-Garden, Wednesday January 4th, 1815, and Wednesday January 11th, 1815: ‘AN ASCENT OF A BALLOON AND PARACHUTE BY MONS. GARNERIN, CARRYING MLLE. GARNERIN, WHO WILL DESCEND IN THE PARACHUTE FROM THE ROOF, OVER THE AUDIENCE, ON TO THE STAGE.’

Elisabeth Garnerin went on to become the first “professional” parachutist, and performed a remarkable (for the times) 39 descents. During her trip to Italy in 1824, the people of Milan hailed her as “Prima Aeroporista” of France after performing her twenty-second and twenty-third descents there. An Italian engraving of the period shows her descending to earth waving an Italian flag in one hand and the French flag in the other.

http://community.vcoins.com/first-parachute-jump-october-22-1797/

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Loading...
 Share

×
×
  • Create New...