Jump to content

List of Cancel Culture victims.


17thfabn

Recommended Posts

Related

Quote

What we call “cancel culture” is really the justice system of this revolution. And the goal of the cancellations is not merely to punish the person being cancelled. The goal is to send a message to everyone else: Step out of line and you are next.

It has worked. A recent CATO study found that 62 percent of Americans are afraid to voice their true views. Nearly a quarter of American academics endorse ousting a colleague for having a wrong opinion about hot-button issues such as immigration or gender differences. And nearly 70 percent of students favor reporting professors if the professor says something that students find offensive, according to a Challey Institute for Global Innovation survey.

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 4 weeks later...
  • Replies 188
  • Created
  • Last Reply

Top Posters In This Topic

I am pleased to learn that Rowling at least has some principles and the spine to stand up for them. I pretty much disagree with most of her views on politics and culture, but she is intelligent enough to realize that the trans movement is effectively erasing women as a biological concept and she is willing to continue stating truths that are bleeding obvious to everyone, while the trio of actors she made world famous are eager to spout nonsense to appease the mob du jour.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 3 weeks later...

Very good You Tube video by John Stossel. He talks about two of the "Fact Checker" groups. 

John Tierney " the people guilty of spreading misinformation are facebook and its fact checkers".     " There not fact checkers there fact blockers".

One of the fact checker groups facebook uses is the Poynter institute. They claim to be non partisan. But have a noticeable leftist bias. 

Science Feedback is another of the "fact checker" that face book uses.

They blocked a study that said masks SOMETIMES cause problems.  Not that mask are ineffective or not needed, just that they SOMETIMES cause problems.  Regardless of if you think masks are needed common sense will tell you there are some down sides to wearing masks. And this study was peer reviewed. 

They labeled it as "partly false" because the study wasn't randomized. The author of the study noted that the study wasn't randomized. Common sense again. I have been in several large airports where it is required to wear a mask at all times. Walking the long distances required with a mask it becomes hard to breath. Same if you are in a large hospital. If you war glasses how quick do they fog up when wearing a mask. I don't need a randomized study to know that mask make it harder to breath and fog your glasses up.

Science Feedback and facebook for a period banned discussion of whether COVID-19 was l possibly man made and accidentally leaked from a lab in the Peoples Paradise of Communist China. Facebook only lifted its ban after the Biden administration admitted there was a possibility that COVID-19 was from a lab leak in China. 

 

 

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 7 months later...

Dave Chappelle got CANCELLED recently.

Chappelle is popular enough that getting cancelled here and there won't effect him. In this case he just ended up doing his show at another venue. 

It was in Minneapolis, so no big surprise. It is a good chance to virtue signal.

It was said it was due to an online petition. I always question online petitions. Is it 10,000 people, or 10 people signing  1,000 times.

https://www.nbcnews.com/news/us-news/dave-chappelle-show-minneapolis-first-avenue-canceled-online-backlash-rcna39263

"Chappelle’s actions uphold a violent heteronormative culture and directly violate First Avenue’s code of conduct," it said. "If staff and guests are held to this standard, performers should be too.” 

"We believe in diverse voices and the freedom of artistic expression, but in honoring that, we lost sight of the impact this would have," the theater said.

 
Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 4 weeks later...

Noone's gonna cancel Old Shatterhand!

Quote

Publisher's withdrawal of Winnetou books stirs outrage in Germany

By Scott Roxborough | 6h ago

Germany wrestles with the legacy of author Karl May, whose fictional Native American hero, Winnetou, embodies the Germans' love affair with the Wild West.

Another day, another online outrage over "cancel culture." German Twitter lit up with instant indignation this week after a German publisher announced it was pulling two children's books from its line-up amid accusations of racism and cultural appropriation.

Both books were inspired by Wild West stories from the wildly popular, and increasingly controversial, 19th-century German writer Karl May.

The books imagine the childhood of May's most famous creation: the fearless Apache brave Winnetou, a fictional Native America chief who made his first appearance in 1875 and whose adventures have been retold in numerous novels — May's books have sold around 200 million copies worldwide — as well as in several movies and even an animated series.

The new titles were to accompany the release of "The Young Chief Winnetou," which hit German theaters August 11. Now there are calls to pull the film as well.

The publisher, Ravensburger Verlag, citing "lots of negative feedback" around the "romanticized" and "clichéd" depiction of Native Americans in the books, dropped the titles from its program and apologized if it had hurt anyone's feelings.

The blowback was quick, and predictable. #Winnetou has been a trending topic online since with the majority of posters furious over what German tabloid Bild, with characteristic restraint, termed the "woke hysteria" that was "burning the hero of our childhood at the stake".

Germany's Wild West obsession

Behind the online fury lies a very real, and particularly German, love affair with the Wild West, an affection that can be traced directly back to Karl May and his idealized depiction of 19th-century America.

May's characters — the noble, heroic Winnetou and his white-skinned "blood brother" Old Shatterhand, a German immigrant land surveyor — are as present in the German popular imagination as the figures in Grimm's Fairy Tales.

You'll find Winnetou books and records in many German households. A series of Winnetou films made during the 1960s are still staples on German TV. There are Karl May-inspired Wild West festivals and theme parks across the county where families gather to dress up as cowboys and Indians on stage sets of saloons and hitching posts. The most popular, in Bad Segeberg , attracts about 250,000 people a year.

That, for many, is the problem. Critics say May's vision of Native American culture, as a sort of prelapsarian utopia, is little more than a convenient fiction that ignores the nastier truths about the genocide of Indigenous people by white settlers.

In the broader discussion around cultural appropriation and who has the right to tell which stories, it doesn't help May's case that he was a white man writing about a culture of which he had no first-hand knowledge.

May only visited America once, after he was already a successful novelist, and didn't get further west than New York.

[...]

But labeling May and his imaginary America as racist and imperialist ignores how radical, for its time, Winnetou was. A century before Kevin Costner's 1990 epic Western film "Dances with Wolves," Karl May flipped the traditional depiction of "wild Indians" and "civilized cowboys," portraying Indigenous Americans (at least Winnetou and his friends) as the heroes, and white settlers mainly as the villains.

German society does not lack for racism but, thanks in large part to Karl May, Native Americans are held in near-universal regard, even if the image the average German has of Indigenous people bears little relation to reality.

[...]

Looking to Karl May and Winnetou expecting an authentic picture of Native experience is like reading Hansel and Gretel for tips on child rearing.

https://m.dw.com/en/publishers-withdrawal-of-winnetou-books-stirs-outrage-in-germany/a-62907190

d28a2e423af1b1a4722dc01c0056d116da76d5e5

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I think I have read all Karl May "western" books when I was in the primary school, about 3rd/4th grade (9-11y/o). Somehow movies never had that "wow" factor on me and his "magic" that could hold hyperactive 10y/o transfixed sitting and reading for hours translated very poorly into world of cinema. :(

Those were in the popular children book collection that has also introduced me to a Moorcock, Salgari, Stevenson and few others.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

1 minute ago, bojan said:

Somehow movies never had that "wow" factor on me and his "magic" that could hold hyperactive 10y/o transfixed sitting and reading for hours translated very poorly into world of cinema. :(

That's probably because the movies were shot in your neck of the woods (well, mostly Croatia really) with local extras playing the Indians, and the setting wasn't appropriately exotic to you. 😁

Link to comment
Share on other sites

7 hours ago, BansheeOne said:

I wonder how many Germans that those fictional books sparked an interest in real Native American culture?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

13 minutes ago, BansheeOne said:

That's probably because the movies were shot in your neck of the woods (well, mostly Croatia really) with local extras playing the Indians, and the setting wasn't appropriately exotic to you. 😁

No, not that, I liked even crappy movies like "Long Ships" or Lancelot and Guinevere despite recognizing more than one place from a sets, but something about adaptation of May's work just did not work. :( Maybe a fact those were in German...

Edited by bojan
Link to comment
Share on other sites

14 minutes ago, bojan said:

I think I have read all Karl May "western" books when I was in the primary school, about 3rd/4th grade (9-11y/o). Somehow movies never had that "wow" factor on me and his "magic" that could hold hyperactive 10y/o transfixed sitting and reading for hours translated very poorly into world of cinema. :(

The list of great books that were rendered on the big screen poorly is legion.

Some times it is a matter the movie being low budget.

Other times it is a case of bad screen play. Translating a book into a 2 hour movie or a ten hour miniseries is a skill.

It could be bad acting or bad direction or a combo of those.

Or it could be a book that is difficult to translate onto the screen. Joseph Wambaugh wrote some great police novels and true stories. All the movies were horrible. His books got into the heads of the characters which doesn't translate well onto the screen.

If you want to read and see a great book translated well into a miniseries watch "Lonesome Dove" and then read the book by Larry McMurtry.  Lonesome Dove is one of the greatest Western Books written. I'm glad it was made into a miniseries instead of a movie. It is too much greatness for just two hours on the big screen. 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

2 hours ago, 17thfabn said:

The list of great books that were rendered on the big screen poorly is legion.

Some times it is a matter the movie being low budget.

Other times it is a case of bad screen play. Translating a book into a 2 hour movie or a ten hour miniseries is a skill.

It could be bad acting or bad direction or a combo of those.

Or it could be a book that is difficult to translate onto the screen. Joseph Wambaugh wrote some great police novels and true stories. All the movies were horrible. His books got into the heads of the characters which doesn't translate well onto the screen.

If you want to read and see a great book translated well into a miniseries watch "Lonesome Dove" and then read the book by Larry McMurtry.  Lonesome Dove is one of the greatest Western Books written. I'm glad it was made into a miniseries instead of a movie. It is too much greatness for just two hours on the big screen. 

Personally I think the 'Police Story' anthology series probably did better than the movies for Wambaugh, though I did enjoy the New Centurions, both book and movie--nothing like a snarling George C. Scott as very angry Andy Kilvinski slapping the sh/t out of a slumlord for gouging some illegals renting a property.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

12 hours ago, 17thfabn said:

I wonder how many Germans that those fictional books sparked an interest in real Native American culture?

There's an entire Wiki article about the image of Native Americans in German pop culture (though the English version relies overly on a single scholar in my view) ...

Quote

[...]

Hobbyists

Native American hobbyism in Germany, also called Indian Hobbyism, or Indianism, is the performance and attempt at historical reenactment of the American Indian culture of the early contact period, rather than the way contemporary Indigenous peoples of the Americas live.[47][48] The cultures imitated are usually a romantic stereotype of Plains Indian cultures, with widely varying degrees of accuracy; influenced by the stereotypes seen in Hollywood Westerns.[47][49] Some of the early to mid 20th century hobbyists gained widespread acclaim as selftaught experts in anything pertaining to the subjects of Native Americana, particularly the Zurich, Switzerland based accountant, Joseph Balmer[50]

[...]

In 2019, it was estimated that between 40,000-100,000 Germans are involved in Indianer hobbyist clubs at any given moment.[59] [...]

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

7 hours ago, sunday said:

Band of Brothers is a good miniseries based in a good book.

Band of Brothers was a great book. It was also a great miniseries.

As a miniseries it worked much better than a movie because you got to know more of the main characters. 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

50 minutes ago, 17thfabn said:

Band of Brothers was a great book. It was also a great miniseries.

As a miniseries it worked much better than a movie because you got to know more of the main characters. 

Yes. FAR too much material for a movie. 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 5 months later...

Oh, it's gonna be epic!

Quote

February 7, 2023 9:45am PT

‘Fawlty Towers’ Set for Revival at Castle Rock, With John Cleese, Camilla Cleese to Write and Star

By Naman Ramachandran

Classic British sitcom “Fawlty Towers” is being revived at Castle Rock Entertainment with original series writer and star John Cleese and his daughter Camilla Cleese set to write and star.

Matthew George, Rob Reiner, Michele Reiner and Derrick Rossi are executive producing the series for Castle Rock Television, which is developing the project. 

“Fawlty Towers,” written by John Cleese and Connie Booth, originally ran in two seasons of six episodes each that were broadcast on the BBC in 1975 and 1979.  The series followed the unfortunate exploits of Basil Fawlty (John Cleese) as he struggled to keep his hotel and marriage afloat. The series currently airs on BBC2 and is also available to stream on BritBox.

The show was ranked first by the British Film Institute in their 100 Greatest British Television Programs list in 2000, and in 2019, Radio Times named it the greatest ever British TV sitcom based on a panel of comedy experts.  

The new series will explore how the over-the-top, cynical and misanthropic Basil Fawlty navigates  the modern world and will explore the relationship between Basil and a daughter he has just discovered he had, as the two tempt fate and team up to run a boutique hotel.

[...]

https://variety.com/2023/global/news/fawlty-towers-revival-castle-rock-john-cleese-1235515583/

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 3 weeks later...

Cultural warriors doing cultural war things:

Quote

Media drop Dilbert after creator’s Black ‘hate group’ remark

By DAVID A. LIEB today

The creator of the Dilbert comic strip faced a backlash of cancellations Saturday while defending remarks describing people who are Black as members of “a hate group” from which white people should “get away.”

Various media publishers across the U.S. denounced the comments by Dilbert creator Scott Adams as racist, hateful and discriminatory while saying they would no longer provide a platform for his work.

Andrews McMeel Syndication, which distributes Dilbert, did not immediately respond Saturday to requests for comment. But Adams defended himself on social media against those whom he said “hate me and are canceling me.”

Dilbert is a long-running comic that pokes fun at office-place culture.

The backlash began following an episode this past week of the YouTube show, “Real Coffee with Scott Adams.” Among other topics, Adams referenced a Rasmussen Reports survey that had asked whether people agreed with the statement “It’s OK to be white.”

Most agreed, but Adams noted that 26% of Black respondents disagreed and others weren’t sure.

The Anti-Defamation League says the phrase was popularized in 2017 as a trolling campaign by members of the discussion forum 4chan but then began being used by some white supremacists.

Adams, who is white, repeatedly referred to people who are Black as members of a “hate group” or a “racist hate group” and said he would no longer “help Black Americans.”

“Based on the current way things are going, the best advice I would give to white people is to get the hell away from Black people,” Adams said on his Wednesday show.

In another episode of his online show Saturday, Adams said he had been making a point that “everyone should be treated as an individual” without discrimination.

“But you should also avoid any group that doesn’t respect you, even if there are people within the group who are fine,” Adams said.

[...]

https://apnews.com/article/animation-and-comics-business-e2266a2356d4159b7f43fdc095be9fcb

Link to comment
Share on other sites

It would be interesting to see exactly what was said.  In the article I see a lot of "reportedly said" but not quotes.

Regardless I would guess Scott Adams is done as a public figure. 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

15 minutes ago, 17thfabn said:

It would be interesting to see exactly what was said.  In the article I see a lot of "reportedly said" but not quotes.

Regardless I would guess Scott Adams is done as a public figure. 

On paper media, perhaps. I don't read newspapers, mind you, nor do I follow his internet Y/T adventures.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

21 minutes ago, 17thfabn said:

It would be interesting to see exactly what was said.  In the article I see a lot of "reportedly said" but not quotes.

https://rumble.com/v2ai6yc-episode-2027-scott-adams-ai-goes-woke-i-accidentally-joined-a-hate-group-tr.html

Relevant section starts at about 13:20 in.

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

×
×
  • Create New...