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2 hours ago, EchoFiveMike said:

Shapiro is like Parlor, just another asshole corralling Americans that have temporarily escaped the plantation before they can see the man behind the curtain.  

I thin he gives a reasonable view that should be possible for folks on the reasonable side of the left to see. That so many are quietly acceding to his being reasonable while at the same time demonstrating the unreasonable and intolerance of the left in charge, is I think useful in the near term. 

He's the diplomat before things are forced to go the marine way. 

2 hours ago, EchoFiveMike said:

Also binary thinking is so fucking tiresome.  S/F....Ken M

I think he's trying to explain it in therms that the left should be able to understand... 

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Despite the anti-Trump thrust, this piece kinda makes the case that many of the Capitol rioters might have been not so much ideologues rather than trolls and people who live in an internet reality. Probably best put here since it goes a bit into the general use of social media in protest movements, and Big Tech regulation.

Quote

The Growing Problem of Online Radicalization

The raid on the Capitol in Washington, D.C., has shown clearly just how dangerous online radicalization can be. By promoting hate and inciting violence, social media platforms represent a danger to democracy.

By Markus Becker, Patrick Beuth, Markus Böhm, Max Hoppenstedt, Janne Knödler, Guido Mingels, Mathieu von Rohr, Marcel Rosenbach und Hilmar Schmundt

15.01.2021, 19.13 Uhr

When the right-wing nationalist and Trump follower Tim Gionet forced his way into the U.S. Capitol on Jan. 6, he brought his social network along with him. He was broadcasting live on the streaming platform DLive, popular in the gaming scene – and he even collected money from his supporters in real time from the in-app donation function. Gionet, who has become a well-known, right-wing internet agitator under the alias "Baked Alaska," streamed for around 20 minutes, even trying to fire up his audience like a blowhard publicity hound. "We've got over 10,000 people live, watching. Let's go!" he said. "Hit that follow button! I appreciate you guys."

As Gionet and the rest of the mob pillaged their way through the halls of Congress, Gionet's followers typed encouraging messages into the app's chat channel – things like: "SMASH THE WINDOW," and "HANG ALL THE CONGRESSMEN." Indeed, it's just like a live chat among gamers, which is what DLive is primarily used for. During the broadcast, his followers rewarded him with lemons, the currency used by the platform, which has become popular among right-wing extremists because it allows its users to do pretty much whatever they want.

The 33-year-old is thought to have brought in around $2,000 during his rampage through the Capitol.

Gionet is essentially a professional troll, one who has long since been banned from mainstream platforms like Twitter and YouTube. At one point during his broadcast, he said that the president would be "happy" about the rioters' activities. "We're fighting for Trump."

The fact that the insurrectionists filmed their crimes in real time, thus presenting clear proof of their misdeeds to the authorities, isn't just evidence of their limited intellectual capacities. It also demonstrates a certain loss of touch with reality among these self-proclaimed "patriots." Nourished by QAnon conspiracy narratives, fantasies of election fraud and Trump's unceasing stream of lies, they believed they were in the right and felt unassailable. As such, the events of Jan. 6 could also be seen as their arrival in a world where they don't feel at all at home: The real one.

The fanatics on the front lines weren't the only ones who had one foot in the virtual world throughout that Wednesday. Hundreds of people in the crowd of supporters outside filmed what they saw on their mobile phones, posted selfies on social networks, sent pictures to friends and liked the images posted by others. The world became witness to the intoxicating narcissism of a mass of people who are constantly online and searching obsessively for clicks and likes. Trump's mob both inside and outside the Capitol were essentially an assault team made up of digital-world friends who had forgotten that they weren't in a video game, but at the seat of Congress, a place where the glass actually does break and people actually do die when shots are fired.

Economist Scott Galloway, well-known as a critic of Silicon Valley and comfortable in the role of prophet of doom, believes the storming of the Capitol "may be the beginning of the end of Big Tech as we know it," as he told Yahoo Finance on Tuesday. Does that, though, mean that we are about to see the disappearance of social media platforms like Facebook and YouTube, which have completely changed and dominated the way their billions of users communicate over the last decade?

[...]

When social media platforms were developing, they looked initially as though they could be a tool for good. The digital sphere democratized access to information and gave a public voice and visibility to broad swaths of the population – and traditional media outlets lost their gatekeeper function.

The consequences were nothing short of revolutionary. Social networks supported the Green Movement in Iran in 2009 and then the Arab Spring starting in 2010. For the first time, it became apparent how much easier it was to organize a protest movement using Twitter and smartphones.

In the ensuing 10 years, social media would go on to play a vital role in almost every meaningful uprising around the world: Euromaidan in Ukraine, the Yellow Vests in France, the democracy activists in Hong Kong, the demonstrations in Chile and Nicaragua and, most recently, the Black Lives Matter demonstrations in the U.S., the #MeToo movement and the protests against the rigged election results in Belarus.

But the ugly side of this powerful tool is becoming increasingly visible. In India, rumors spread via WhatsApp led to deadly eruptions of violence. In Myanmar, according to human rights groups, online incitement campaigns against the Rohingya minority contributed to murder, rape and expulsions. In European democracies like Poland, France and Britain, social media platforms have fueled populism.

[...]

Might deplatforming actually be counterproductive? After all, it helps solidify anti-establishment views and prevents them from having to see pushback from the moderate center – with the danger that users of alternative networks could radicalize each other even more strongly than now.

Security agencies are also skeptical of deplatforming. It is easier for them to keep an eye on open, mainstream social media platforms than to monitor the scattered alternative platforms, some of which, like Telegram, are much more difficult to access.

The public response to the banning of Trump was divided. There was a lot of support for it, but also a lot of concern. The most prominent critic of the move is to be found in Berlin. Chancellor Angela Merkel said through her spokesman that she finds it "problematic" that the U.S. president's social media accounts can be permanently blocked. The fundamental right to freedom of expression is of elementary importance, she said, and any restrictions must be introduced by lawmakers, not by private companies.

European Competition Commissioner Margrethe Vestager also isn't a fan of blocking Trump, as she told DER SPIEGEL. "No, it is not in itself reassuring that private companies de facto decide what we are allowed to see as users," she says. There is, Vestager continues, a difference between harmful, illegal content – "and what we as humans just disagree with."

Still, Vestager allowed that it is interesting that Twitter and Facebook now "acknowledge that they have a shared responsibility to prevent the spread of illegal content." The commissioner, who is also the vice president of the European Commission, is widely considered to be the most powerful woman in the world when it comes to regulating internet content.

Either way, the shocking scenes from Washington and its aftermath have provided ammunition to all those who have spent years calling for the power of tech companies to be limited. In December in the U.S., the Federal Trade Commission in cooperation with 40 states sued Facebook for "anti-competition conduct," and demanded that acquisitions made recently by the company be rolled back.

A similar lawsuit is currently pending against Google as well. Shortly before Christmas, the European Commission presented a plan, called the Digital Services Act, for regulating platforms. The goal is the elimination of unfair business practices and the encouragement of more competition.

[...]

https://www.spiegel.de/international/world/twitter-facebook-and-co-the-growing-problem-of-online-radicalization-a-a6291e38-b7fb-46fa-8667-498a363ec06d

And the lead image of the article is just too good to not post:

9d6f563f-330d-4f8b-a18d-b54b9ca39949_w94

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Now one could be diverse while buying for groceries. Wonder what will happen to those that do not have a diverse enough collection of items once they arrive at checkout.

https://www.supermarketnews.com/issues-trends/giant-food-highlight-minority-owned-suppliers-shelves

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7 hours ago, BansheeOne said:

Despite the anti-Trump thrust, this piece kinda makes the case that many of the Capitol rioters might have been not so much ideologues rather than trolls and people who live in an internet reality. Probably best put here since it goes a bit into the general use of social media in protest movements, and Big Tech regulation.

And the lead image of the article is just too good to not post:

 

That makes some sense, along with some attention whores (Buffalo Helmet Man, for example, and Podium Man). I know little about the QAnon thing, but it smells like a troll job to me (for what purpose, who knows).

As for the image, unlike the 1960s, The Revolution will not only be televised, it will be livestreamed.

 

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We might have to wait about 18 months to see whether the recent rioters are treated more harshly by the law than those from Trump's inauguration in 2017, but I suspect that if they are it will be not just due to the additional penalties for breaching a secured official building (and killing a cop in the process), but also the elephantastic digital trail they left. Including the recovered Parler posts which reportedly had GPS data attached in many cases (Parler has been ridiculed for the atrocious security standards which made that possible, but being a "free speech network", maybe they just assumed their users understood the inextricable link between personal freedom and personal responsibility). 

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1 hour ago, sunday said:

Now one could be diverse while buying for groceries. Wonder what will happen to those that do not have a diverse enough collection of items once they arrive at checkout.

https://www.supermarketnews.com/issues-trends/giant-food-highlight-minority-owned-suppliers-shelves

No customer shall buy less than 50% of minority owned products. Otherwise he is a racist.

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1 minute ago, DB said:

How do we tell that they're minority owned? Sticking a picture of a Native American on the packaging?

Like Aunt Jemima, the Land-o-Lakes woman and Uncle Ben? Oops, can't do that.

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20 minutes ago, DB said:

How do we tell that they're minority owned? Sticking a picture of a Native American on the packaging?

The supermarket chain will be using color-coded labeling.

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4 hours ago, seahawk said:

No customer shall buy less than 50% of minority owned products. Otherwise he is a racist.

 Considering 90 percent of the products or packaging are made in China its pretty much impossible to be a racist.

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