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1 hour ago, Skywalkre said:

Oh, I agree.  As I mentioned if one is poor it's not impossible to eat healthy.  It's just harder.

I think the real issue here in the States is that no matter where one lies on the SES food is often used as comfort.  Had a bad/stressful/whatever day?  Go get that fast food/make that comfort meal from childhood/go out to the fancy restaurant (which is no guarantee you're eating healthy).

I'd be curious what you and the rest of our European contingent could share regarding if this behavior is the same over on that side of the pond.  From friends who have spent some time in Europe to the fact your population is healthier I'd wager it's not as widespread over there.

Not having lived in the US can't make a very good comparison but at least on the broad lines it's similar. From Finnish point of view, we *are* an obese nation (about 65% of population over 25 BMI, so not much behind the US) but eating out is expensive here, even fast food. Especially lower-income people tend to either cook themselves or heat up tv dinners. Pre-cooked meals heated in microwave might not exactly be healthy, but at least energy intake remains reasonable with those... 


Though over here, for especially men, a bad/stressful/whatever day might more often result in a sixpack coming from the grocery store in addition to the tv dinner which of course comes with just as much excess energy intake plus other issues....

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2 hours ago, Skywalkre said:

...I'd be curious what you and the rest of our European contingent could share regarding if this behavior is the same over on that side of the pond.

It is not uncommon, but drinking on those occasions is probably even more common. Obesity is unfortunately steadily climbing round here and especially child obesity.

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3 hours ago, Skywalkre said:

I'd be curious what you and the rest of our European contingent could share regarding if this behavior is the same over on that side of the pond.  From friends who have spent some time in Europe to the fact your population is healthier I'd wager it's not as widespread over there.

I'd say overall, we're having the same problems over here in Germany, maybe slightly fewer people with heavy obesity. The standard fast food joints like McDonald's seem to be mostly frequented by lower-income people over here, often with an immigrant background.

One thing that might be interesting is the overall physical mobility of the population. Just from the way city planning is done and towns are laid out in Europe vs. North America, we might have fewer door-to-door car trips vs. more bike rides or just walking.

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4 hours ago, Skywalkre said:

Oh, I agree.  As I mentioned if one is poor it's not impossible to eat healthy.  It's just harder.

I think the real issue here in the States is that no matter where one lies on the SES food is often used as comfort.  Had a bad/stressful/whatever day?  Go get that fast food/make that comfort meal from childhood/go out to the fancy restaurant (which is no guarantee you're eating healthy).

I'd be curious what you and the rest of our European contingent could share regarding if this behavior is the same over on that side of the pond.  From friends who have spent some time in Europe to the fact your population is healthier I'd wager it's not as widespread over there.

I don't see the correlation in all honesty.  When my wife and I were poor as crap we ate much healthier because we went with the traditional poor food diet; rice, beans, frozen vegetables, and small amounts of cheap cuts of meat and fish.  You can eat those to this day and be healthy and really, really frugal.  Somewhere along the line cooking seems to have become socially accepted as tossed salads with fresh produce, cold cut sandwiches, grilled fish, chicken breasts smeared with sauce at a minimum and yes, that is probably too expensive for people on low incomes.  I go into inner city stores and you can get plenty of rice, beans, and cheap spice mixtures.  Throw some canned green beans, peas, tomatoes from there and you can make a week's worth of dinners for less than 10 bucks.  I think we've also become accustomed to far more calories than we need or ate historically and so those junk foods scratch that developed itch much more effectively and are cheaper if your goal is to pound 3000 calories, they are just junk calories.

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It looks like when Anthony Fauci wasn't funding GoF research in China, he was funding puppy torture in Tunisia.
https://thehill.com/changing-america/well-being/medical-advances/578086-bipartisan-legislators-demand-answers-from-fauci
 

Quote

"Our investigators show that Fauci’s NIH division shipped part of a $375,800 grant to a lab in Tunisia to drug beagles and lock their heads in mesh cages filled with hungry sand flies so that the insects could eat them alive," White Coat Waste told Changing America. "They also locked beagles alone in cages in the desert overnight for nine consecutive nights to use them as bait to attract infectious sand flies."

 

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1 hour ago, DKTanker said:

It looks like when Anthony Fauci wasn't funding GoF research in China, he was funding puppy torture in Tunisia.
https://thehill.com/changing-america/well-being/medical-advances/578086-bipartisan-legislators-demand-answers-from-fauci
 

 

 For many people torturing puppies is a bridge too far. Ironically this could be more trouble for the good Dr. than many other of his questionable acts.

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5 hours ago, nitflegal said:

I don't see the correlation in all honesty.  When my wife and I were poor as crap we ate much healthier because we went with the traditional poor food diet; rice, beans, frozen vegetables, and small amounts of cheap cuts of meat and fish.  You can eat those to this day and be healthy and really, really frugal. 

The problem with rice and beans is that they are really cheap and part of an unhealthily carb-centric diet (IMHO). Likewise for potatoes, pasta, etc. $/meal, $/lb, $/kcal are all lowest for carbs. You can see the impact of those facts in inner-city Walmarts.

 

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If you eat only a lot of those they are. Any monotonous diet tends toward unhealthy in the long term.

Buckwheat is a great thing to substitute rice with. Unfortunately hipsters seems to have discovered it and prices are going up, at least locally. I avoid pasta and noodles like a plague.

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6 hours ago, lucklucky said:

Rice and beans unhealthy?

https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/11507324/

https://www.nature.com/articles/srep16919

https://care.diabetesjournals.org/content/27/2/613

Basic observation of Asians versus Americans, specifically obesity rates, had some folks believing that Asians had some genetic adaptation such that they could have a rice-centric diet and not get overweight. Then some researcher looked at 1st generation Asian-Americans, who had obesity out the wazoo. Conclusion was that there was no genetic adaptation, it was portion size.

1 hour of unskilled labor at minimum wage rates will provide enough take-home pay to buy enough cheap beans, rice, pasta to overfeed a half dozen personnel for a week. Extrapolate to years. 

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  The rice isn’t the problem. The problem is sugar. It’s in everything, cereals, sodas, spaghetti sauce, peanut butter, and ice cream . Next is fats - french fries, potato chips, cheeses and the somewhat cheese-like substances on hamburgers and tortilla chips. 
  It’s rather easy to overindulge on potato chips. I’d find it quite hard to overindulge on rice and beans, but that may partly be cultural. 
  Most Americans find it easy to overindulge on steak. Overindulging on squid or fish isn’t so easy, which may be a significant part of many Asian diets. 
  And the difficulty in eating healthy in low income households may be due to a lack of foods prepared from scratch (sometimes due to lack of time after a long work day, sometimes due to lack of effort). 

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Tell the Irish of the 19th centuries that the lack of potato made them healthier. Carbohydrates by themselves aren't unhealthy. They are a necessary and valuable ingredient to any diet, otherwise filling up on steak alone (all protein and fat) would be healthier than a mix of a small steak and some potatos. Refined sugar on the other hand, while tasty, certainly is both problematic and completely unnecessary strictly from a dietary point of view.

I would not want to live in a completely sugar free world. But I'm trying to reduce my intake of it whenever it doesn't hurt. The categorical rejection of carbohydrates from the world's diet (no grains, no potatos) would not just be a folly, but a monumental disaster.

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In most western countries big part of the problem is that nowadays we just consume very little during our daily lives. A lot of carbs and fat is fine and needed even if you're doing physical work, that's why we like those: that kept us going when shortage, not excess of energy was the problem... but now most of the population is sitting in office during work and almost as many spend the evenings in sofa, and practically everyone can easily afford all the carbs and fats you could possibly want.

The issue with carbs is that you can eat a lot, get a lot of energy intake, but in a few hours you're hungry again and eating more. Same amount of energy from fat, proteins and mixed with good amount of fibers will push the next hunger much further. For me at least that was what made losing weight easy when a realized some years ago the weight  was starting to build up... I did half a year all sugars and carb-heavy foods completely off (no bread, rice, pasta, potatoes, replaced by cooked veggies) but without limiting meat and fat. That took off 30 kg without feeling like i was on a diet and only light exercise... after getting back to a bit more normal diet, still limiting but not totally cutting carbs, some if it crept back up, but most stayed off.

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A visit to a dietitian suggested that as far as proportions of food are concerned, one could divide a plate into quarters. One quarter protein, one quarter carbs and the rest vegetables (or salad). obviously potatoes count in the carb section and fats could be gotten from the protein side. bearing in mind that the recommended amount of fats is quite small and only going to be a problem if you're limiting yourself to the very leanest of proteins.

"Balancing" your diet is fairly flexible unless you're regularly binging poutine by the gallon (bushel? cubic metre?), a little over or under day-today isn't going to kill you. What kills you if you're roughly balancing the proportions of your diet is total calories - i.e. lack of portion control, as already noted.

"Processed" foods, starting with cured meats and ending with TV dinners and takeouts are universally unbalanced - far too much sugar in everything American, even the bread, and far too much salt in everything else.

There is a lot to be said for putting corn into renewable fuels, it may pay better than corn syrup.

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Interim data shows that the Moderna coronavirus vaccine produces a strong immune response in children ages 6 to 11, the company announced Monday.

 

The European Medicines Agency said early Monday it initiated a “rolling review” of evidence on the efficacy and safety of molnupiravir, the antiviral pill developed by Merck and Ridgeback Biotherapeutics to treat covid-19 — an initial step in the longer process toward authorization.

 

A new report from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention found that “severe outcomes” for covid-19 patients did not increase significantly since the delta variant started spreading widely — suggesting that while the variant is more contagious, it does not cause more severe illness.

Analyzing data from 14 states, the CDC found that the proportion of patients who were admitted to an intensive care unit, put on a ventilator or died “did not significantly change from the pre-Delta period to the Delta period.”

 

 

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On 10/24/2021 at 1:51 AM, Harold Jones said:

Maybe this will cause some to rethink their stance.

FCUWeVuVIAAWfva.jpeg

 

🤣🤣🤣 Took a while to work through it but worth the effort.

 

In Covid news from Germany: 

On the one hand any ten thousands have died (of and with) Covid.

On the other hand the overall mortality for 2020 was not above average ... it was below! 

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47 minutes ago, Markus Becker said:

 

🤣🤣🤣 Took a while to work through it but worth the effort.

 

In Covid news from Germany: 

On the one hand any ten thousands have died (of and with) Covid.

On the other hand the overall mortality for 2020 was not above average ... it was below! 

In the U.S. it was a very mild flu season last year . Probably the same for pneumonia.

Some say due to the mitigation measures taken for COVID. 

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5 hours ago, 17thfabn said:

In the U.S. it was a very mild flu season last year . Probably the same for pneumonia.

Some say due to the mitigation measures taken for COVID. 

Or because people got COVID instead?? I don’t know but am curious.

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