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Curious about studies showing that people having recived the Calmette vaccination have a much reduced risk of catching Covid-19.

In my country, people aged between 35 and 75 have recived this when they were children and it does seem that young people and the elderly appears more likely to catch the virus and - in case of the elderly - to die from it. 

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1 hour ago, cbo said:

Curious about studies showing that people having recived the Calmette vaccination have a much reduced risk of catching Covid-19.

In my country, people aged between 35 and 75 have recived this when they were children and it does seem that young people and the elderly appears more likely to catch the virus and - in case of the elderly - to die from it. 

https://www.cedars-sinai.org/newsroom/study-tb-vaccine-linked-to-lower-risk-of-contracting-covid-19/

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26 minutes ago, JWB said:

That isn't what the study implied at all.  It didn't even address the issue of masks in its interpretation/conclusion.  A controlled study about the efficacy of wearing masks would have had the control group also entering the five hour event sans masks.  A controlled study about the  efficacy of masks would then have had both groups quarantined for a number of days to rule out another source of infection.

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https://spectator.us/topic/treated-traitor-interview-who-whistleblower-francesco-zambon/
 

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Francesco Zambon is calling the World Health Organization to account. Zambon, who was based at the WHO’s Venice bureau, claims that the WHO suppressed critical information about the pandemic to serve the political interests of member countries. There are conflicts of interest at the highest levels of the institution, he says. As a result, according to Zambon, the world lost valuable time in mounting effective defenses against the pandemic.

Back in May 2020, Zambon and his team wrote a report for the WHO called: ‘An unprecedented challenge: Italy’s first response to COVID-19’. The report, drafted in a time of emergency, was meant to help other nations still untouched by the virus and it could have saved lives, says Zambon. But soon after it was published, the document came under fire from high cadres within the WHO. It did not survive more than 24 hours online before being taken down.

 

 

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On 5/30/2021 at 12:27 AM, Ssnake said:

Because China is powerful and can hurt news organizations if they say something they don't like. And the others are not. That's why.

We would prefer to believe that calling it the UK Variant doesn't affect our manliness in the eyes of the world. China however is terrified that the world will think it has a small pipi.

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9 hours ago, JWB said:

After some research I have discovered.......

"Some of the funding for the experiment came from Primavera Sound Group, a Spanish concert company that also employs one of the study’s authors."

https://www.washingtonpost.com/world/2021/05/28/spain-coronavirus-concert-experiment/

 

Shame on you Lancet.

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7 hours ago, DB said:

We would prefer to believe that calling it the UK Variant doesn't affect our manliness in the eyes of the world.

Don't worry. We know that you have a Johnson.

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Calling it the UK variant says a great deal about our ability to innovate....

Supposedly Fauchi said they were trying to get away from labelling 'Indian Variant, UK Variant' for this precise reason, and they adopted a system based on birds that seems to have completely failed to be adopted. It may have made sense to have called it 'variant Mk1, Variant Mk2'. But you know the media, they love to blame someone.

 

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19 hours ago, DKTanker said:

That isn't what the study implied at all.  It didn't even address the issue of masks in its interpretation/conclusion.  A controlled study about the efficacy of wearing masks would have had the control group also entering the five hour event sans masks.  A controlled study about the  efficacy of masks would then have had both groups quarantined for a number of days to rule out another source of infection.

I confess to being unsure what they were trying to accomplish with this study.  Beyond the effect that they cite doesn't hit statistical significance the underlying premise is flawed.  There is no way to track where those 2 covid cases came from as the experiment covered 5 hours of a 192 hour period and they do not report data on what participants were doing during those 187 other hours.  The underlying flaw of the experiment is that there is no way to measure during the active experiment timeframe Covid exposure.  I can understand it wouldn't be easy or cheap but for this study to be useful they would have needed to have both groups immediately go into isolation for the 8 days after the five hour concert period to eliminate opportunities to contract Covid by the testing date.  Additionally, it does what a lot of substandard papers do where it provides lots of unanalyzed data such as room dimensions that they never bother to tie to the experiment.  It's akin to randomly citing the wall thickness of your glassware to pad out an article with as many numbers as possible yet never use those numbers to support your conclusion.  I've peer reviewed plenty of articles for publications less prestigious than the Lancet and we never would have published this one.

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1 hour ago, nitflegal said:

I confess to being unsure what they were trying to accomplish with this study.

Um, "do some science?"

You know, the lab coat thing, with safety goggles & stuff. And then they have these things that go beep sometimes.

Like, here:

https://www.theonion.com/study-multiple-stab-wounds-may-be-harmful-to-monkeys-1819594625

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2 hours ago, nitflegal said:

I confess to being unsure what they were trying to accomplish with this study. 

Didn't Stalin say something along the lines of "quantity has a quality all its own"...?

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3 hours ago, nitflegal said:

I confess to being unsure what they were trying to accomplish with this study.

There are trying to get governments to allow more indoor music events so the sponsor of the study can make more money.

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https://www.nature.com/articles/d41586-021-01436-7
 

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Hundreds of gibberish papers still lurk in the scientific literature

The nonsensical computer-generated articles, spotted years after the problem was first seen, could lead to a wave of retractions.

The issue began in 2005, when three PhD students created paper-generating software called SCIgen for “maximum amusement”, and to show that some conferences would accept meaningless papers. The program cobbles together words to generate research articles with random titles, text and charts, easily spotted as gibberish by a human reader. It is free to download, and anyone can use it.

By 2012, computer scientist Cyril Labbé had found 85 fake SCIgen papers in conferences published by the Institute of Electrical and Electronic Engineers (IEEE); he went on to find more than 120 fake SCIgen papers published by the IEEE and by Springer2. It was unclear who had generated the papers or why. The articles were subsequently retracted — or sometimes deleted — and Labbé released a website allowing anyone to upload a manuscript and check whether it seems to be a SCIgen invention. Springer also sponsored a PhD project to help spot SCIgen papers, which resulted in free software called SciDetect. (Springer is now part of Springer Nature; Nature’s news team is editorially independent of its publisher.)

 

What makes it so hilarious is that bot-papers have been inflicted on the IEEE.

 

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7 hours ago, Ssnake said:

Um, "do some science?"

You know, the lab coat thing, with safety goggles & stuff. And then they have these things that go beep sometimes.

Like, here:

https://www.theonion.com/study-multiple-stab-wounds-may-be-harmful-to-monkeys-1819594625

that's bush league.  i have prescription safety glasses AND a PAPR.  it makes me 18.63% more attractive to nerd chicks than my peers.

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Well, this definitely helps;

https://pjmedia.com/news-and-politics/rick-moran/2021/05/30/hat-shop-apologizes-for-selling-yellow-not-vaccinated-stars-n1450852
 

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A hat shop owner in Nashville is apologizing after outrage over the store selling “not vaccinated” yellow stars, fashioned after the insignia Jews were forced to wear by Nazis, hit social media.

“HatWRKS,” the store that offered the item for $5, is run by haberdasher Gigi Gaskins. In an Instagram post, there was an “explanation” for why she compared unvaccinated people to Holocaust-era Jews.

 

 

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On the previous post, just another example of people not using the braincells they were given at birth.

In other news, there is an interesting employment dynamic emerging as the UK relaxes lockdown constraints on which shops are allowed to open.

https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/business-57310154

A number of businesses took up a lot of employment slack during the lockdown - in this example Dominos pizza - as other options were closed (in this case it's likely to be that they employed people who had worked in other food service roles, but in pubs and restaurants that could not transition to a takeaway or "al fresco" dining model), and probably event hospitality.

And now that their old jobs are back, they're off. Which is "interesting" in that it shows there there is a job hierarchy all the way to the bottom, but primarily because it suggests that Dominos may not yet understand that the lockdown demand for overpriced and underwhelming pizza may not last as alternatives return to the market.

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19 hours ago, nitflegal said:

I confess to being unsure what they were trying to accomplish with this study.  Beyond the effect that they cite doesn't hit statistical significance the underlying premise is flawed.  There is no way to track where those 2 covid cases came from as the experiment covered 5 hours of a 192 hour period and they do not report data on what participants were doing during those 187 other hours.  The underlying flaw of the experiment is that there is no way to measure during the active experiment timeframe Covid exposure.  I can understand it wouldn't be easy or cheap but for this study to be useful they would have needed to have both groups immediately go into isolation for the 8 days after the five hour concert period to eliminate opportunities to contract Covid by the testing date.  Additionally, it does what a lot of substandard papers do where it provides lots of unanalyzed data such as room dimensions that they never bother to tie to the experiment.  It's akin to randomly citing the wall thickness of your glassware to pad out an article with as many numbers as possible yet never use those numbers to support your conclusion.  I've peer reviewed plenty of articles for publications less prestigious than the Lancet and we never would have published this one.

The "experiment" was the excuse to have the concert approved by those who need to approve, any science was incidental.

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Although it seems to be a long time ago now, if you can access it, this BBC Sounds podcast from February provides an interesting discussion of the spat between the UK and the EU about the equitable distribution of vaccines.

https://www.bbc.co.uk/sounds/play/m000rty5

Notes from the discussion: "Vaccine Nationalism" may not necessarily be a bad thing because it provides a political focus to incentivize politicians to invest in R&D and facilities (My note: "Vaccine Nationalism" may also be called "National Security" depending on your perspective).

The US and UK invested 7 times the amount of money into the R&D phase of the vaccines than the EU did and in general made pre-orders earlier. As a result, they took on significantly more risk. Implicitly, then, they gained a reward when the vaccines were broadly successful.

Investing early at high risk of failure yields earlier results on success - noting that without the speculative investment in Pfizer and Moderna then neither of these would have been available early... and most of this investment was not from the EU.

There are also some comments about how the UK may have audited the claims of quantities available by the manufacturers more thoroughly than the EU did, and applied clauses to their contracts accordingly.

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3 hours ago, DB said:

 

In other news, there is an interesting employment dynamic emerging as the UK relaxes lockdown constraints on which shops are allowed to open.

https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/business-57310154

A number of businesses took up a lot of employment slack during the lockdown - in this example Dominos pizza - as other options were closed (in this case it's likely to be that they employed people who had worked in other food service roles, but in pubs and restaurants that could not transition to a takeaway or "al fresco" dining model), and probably event hospitality.

And now that their old jobs are back, they're off. Which is "interesting" in that it shows there there is a job hierarchy all the way to the bottom, but primarily because it suggests that Dominos may not yet understand that the lockdown demand for overpriced and underwhelming pizza may not last as alternatives return to the market.

Similar thing is observed i Denmark. 

Hundreds of young people lost their jobs in restaurants and bars, but found new employment as nose-swabbers at the many covid-19 test facilities. 

Now that restaurants and bars have reopenened, they have difficulties attracting former staff, because nose-poking pays better and may also be an easier job. 

Edited by cbo
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