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Aboard Japanese Sub In World War 2


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Interesting that they had plants aboard. Was this a regular practice?

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=e3s8lwt_ZSc

Let's say it's not unusual for sailors to bring small reminders of home onboard. Spending several months at sea in confined spaces with only other -- usually young men -- can have its irritating moments. Ships are literally a home away from home.

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True. In that environment, little things take on huge importance. Keeping plants alive had to be a challenge. I also wondered if they were able to grow enough to affect the atmosphere in the boat.

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No mentioning of a flower which looks like ikebana (flower arrangement), but I was reminded of an interview not long ago with a war veteran that had served on a I-361 submarine. Some stories included how his sub commander directed the sub to dive to only a shallow depth of about 15 meters in order to avoid dept charges that were probably set for speculating deeper dive depths. Japanese subs went only to around 70 meters down. Explosions from underneath were heard. Another story was how towards the end, his submarine took the role of sending off the human suicide kaiten mini subs. In which he described his exchange of words with the former pilot then trained for the kaiten subs in the kaiten before sealing it off and launching the sub. It might be interesting one way or the other.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DEFxLIAqDjo

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True. In that environment, little things take on huge importance. Keeping plants alive had to be a challenge. I also wondered if they were able to grow enough to affect the atmosphere in the boat.

 

Submarines in WW2 spent most of their time in the surface, and Japanese subs weren't particularly good submarines being slow to dive and not very deep diving at that.

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Wow, I wish the video JasonJ linked to had English translation or subtitles...

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US fleet subs also had air conditioning. Earlier vessels were called 'pig boats' for a reason...

Edited by shep854
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Wow, I wish the video JasonJ linked to had English translation or subtitles...

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US fleet subs also had air conditioning. Earlier vessels were called 'pig boats' for a reason...

 

And the air conditioning was more for the electronics and to keep the crew from keeling over than the modern version of cold, dry comfort. The early war patrols of the V boats show how dangerous the boats were without air conditioning. The Argonaut had major issues with this early on.

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  • 3 weeks later...

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