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Protests In Hong Kong


Stuart Galbraith

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2 hours ago, bojan said:

They claim right to the rest of China. :)

And the PRC claims the rest of the region down to the Philippines and Vietnam. I'm waiting on them to demand Bangladesh because of a period of Chinese History. 

How many of our eastern Europeans are ok with the idea that the Turks should have back parts of Europe where they may live?  Re-install Kebab?

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5 hours ago, rmgill said:

Which people though. The people of Shanghai or in this case Hong Kong do they have a right to Hong Kong or do the Chinese in Beijing have a right to Hong Kong. Because there's not one mono-block of Chinese who think as one. 

The Chinese in Beijing claim a right to Taiwan. What about the Chinese in Taipei? 
 

 

 

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4 hours ago, bojan said:

They claim right to the rest of China. :)

If Taiwan could declare independence from the China identity, that claim would go away. It's an old relic kept alive because the PRC threatens Taiwan to not declare independence.

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2 hours ago, rmgill said:

How many of our eastern Europeans are ok with the idea that the Turks should have back parts of Europe where they may live?  Re-install Kebab?

IDK, when they invaded Cyprus there was no real backlash from the freedom lowing US. Nor was when they have invaded Syria. Or Iraq.

Also it is not even closely comparable, since both Taiwan (Republic of China) and PRC (People Republic of China) consider themselves Chinese, while none in the Balkans consider themselves Turks. Not even Bosnia Muslims, and if you try to call them "Turks" you might lose few teeth.

Thing is, US and west have sold Taiwan down the river with a deal with mainland China, especially kicking it out of UN, everything post that is a window dressing using Taiwan to poke China when needed, while never really supporting it in the way it really matters.

Same for HK.

 

 

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38 minutes ago, bojan said:

IDK, when they invaded Cyprus there was no real backlash from the freedom lowing US. Nor was when they have invaded Syria. Or Iraq.

Also it is not even closely comparable, since both Taiwan (Republic of China) and PRC (People Republic of China) consider themselves Chinese, while none in the Balkans consider themselves Turks. Not even Bosnia Muslims, and if you try to call them "Turks" you might lose few teeth.

Thing is, US and west have sold Taiwan down the river with a deal with mainland China, especially kicking it out of UN, everything post that is a window dressing using Taiwan to poke China when needed, while never really supporting it in the way it really matters.

Same for HK.

 

 

 

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  • 3 weeks later...
Quote

Date 03.12.2021

Author Ole Tangen Jr.

Hong Kong: How is China's crackdown changing the city's identity?

Residents fear their city's unique identity has been lost as Beijing cracks down on critical discourse. In the face of possible legal trouble, many are self-censoring or turning to alternative forms of expression.

Hong Kong authorities are pursuing new laws to tighten the city-state's grip on public discourse critical of its Beijing-aligned government.

Residents are resorting to self-censorship and many feel that their city's progressive identity may have been permanently lost.

Speaking at the 2021 China Internet Media Forum in Guangzhou in late November, Hong Kong's Chief Executive Carrie Lam stated that her government would be moving forward with plans to further crack down on online expression.

"With the rapid development of internet technology, inherent laws may not be able to effectively deal with various misconduct on the internet, such as malicious disclosure of other people's personal information, hateful and discriminatory remarks or 'fake news,'" she told the audience.

Lam announced the possibility of anti-"fake news" legislation in May, and the government recently began a legal study into the issue.

The government is also busy drafting a cybersecurity law to protect against cyber-attacks. The law would also define internet providers as crucial infrastructure, making it possible for the government to exert greater control over online content.

Her speech came 18 months after Hong Kong's authorities adopted a national security law handed down by Beijing, which stipulates heavy legal penalties for loosely defined acts of secession, subversion, terrorism, and collusion with foreign organizations. 

[...]

Rebecca is another resident who laments her city's transformation. She is in her 20s and considers herself part of the pro-democracy community.

These days, when she walks the streets of her city, she says she feels saddened by how similar and sanitary everything looks, and how the streets are increasingly covered with government advertisements calling Hong Kong "Asia's world city."

"It almost seems like a way for the government to convince us that everything in Hong Kong is still the same, and that we are still Asia's 'world city,'" Rebecca, who also asked that only her first name be used, told DW.

"The reason why it's depressing in Hong Kong is because everyone knows everything has changed," she added. 

Despite the danger, Rebecca insists that critical discourse is still happening, but has taken up new forms that are less open or obvious. For example, she recently attended a theater production about zombies attacking Hong Kong.

"People laughed at it," she said. "I was like: 'This is a zombie story, but it's about Hong Kong.'"

https://www.dw.com/en/hong-kong-how-is-chinas-crackdown-changing-the-citys-identity/a-60007287

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  • 3 weeks later...
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Date 19.12.2021

Hong Kong: Voting begins for 'patriots only' legislators

Voters in Hong Kong are taking to the polls for the first time since Beijing changed electoral rules. All the candidates have been vetted for their political views and "patriotism."

Hong Kong's polling booths opened Sunday, with voters electing members to the legislative council (LegCo) for the first time since new electoral reforms took effect.

The electoral reforms, however, are controversial because people of the city are voting for candidates who have been vetted for their political views and "patriotism." Only 20 out of 90 candidates will be elected directly.

The changes were introduced and imposed by China earlier this March. They were then approved by Hong Kong's lawmakers this June.

The largest chunk of seats, 40, will be picked by a committee of 1,500 staunch Beijing loyalists. The remaining 30 will be chosen by reliably pro-Beijing committees that represent special-interest and industry groups.

At 3:30 pm (7:30 UTC), halfway through the 14-hour voting period, just under 19%, or 839,563 of the 4.5 million-strong electorate had cast votes, marking the lowest halfway turnout rate since the city's 1997 handover to China. In 2016, 27% had cast votes by the same point.

Activists on blast over alleged boycott calls

Polling booths were heavily guarded by the police. Around 10,000 police officers have been deployed to make sure elections went smoothly, Raymond Siu, the chief of the police department, said.

To encourage people to vote, Hong Kong authorities offered free public transport and even sent out reminder messages on Saturday.

The message read: "Casting your vote for HK_our Home! LegCo election is important to you and HK's future!"

Although around 4.4 million residents are eligible to vote, turnout is expected to be quite low. The latest survey by the Hong Kong Public Opinion Research Institute showed that 39% of respondents indicated that they are unlikely to vote.

In Hong Kong, it not illegal to refrain from voting or cast blank ballots. From this year, however, it is considered a serious crime to incite others to a boycott or urge them to cast invalid ballots.

Hong Kong officials on Saturday issued warrants accusing five overseas activists of calling for a boycott of Sunday's legislative poll.

[...]

https://www.dw.com/en/hong-kong-voting-begins-for-patriots-only-legislators/a-60183958

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On 11/17/2021 at 9:03 PM, rmgill said:

And the PRC claims the rest of the region down to the Philippines and Vietnam. I'm waiting on them to demand Bangladesh because of a period of Chinese History. 

How many of our eastern Europeans are ok with the idea that the Turks should have back parts of Europe where they may live?  Re-install Kebab?

 

In that case the Brits would like to have a word with about 1/4 of the world.

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26 minutes ago, Mikel2 said:

 

In that case the Brits would like to have a word with about 1/4 of the world.

Tsar Vlad also subscribes to that newsletter and thinks restoring the Elbe as Russia's western border would be a great idea.

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Vetted candidates, reduced direct electable seats, a Pro-Beijing landslide. 

I feel bad for Joshua Wong and Agnes Chow and others like them. Their efforts could not match the seasoned Beijing machine and the outside world was not good enough for their cause in HK. I feel particularly bad for Agnes Chow. She appealed very hard to Japan. Japan let her down.

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Date 24.12.2021

Hong Kong: More universities remove Tiananmen monuments

Monuments marking Beijing's 1989 crackdown on the Tiananmen protests have been cleared from two more universities in Hong Kong — a day after a sculpture commemorating the victims was dismantled.

Two Hong Kong universities on Friday removed public monuments commemorating the 1989 Tiananmen pro-democracy protests that took place in Beijing. 

One of the sculptures removed was a 6-meter (21 foot) replica of the giant statue students had erected in Tiananmen Square by Chen Weiming. 

The Lingnan University of Hong Kong removed another relief sculpture marking the Tiananmen crackdown, also created by Chen.

A day earlier, Hong Kong's oldest university removed a statue commemorating the crackdown, sparking outcry by activists and dissident artists.

It was not clear whether the statues were removed at the request of Chinese authorities. 

[...]

Crackdown on memorials?

Last week, the 6.4-meter (20-foot) bronze "Goddess of Democracy" statue holding a flame aloft at Hong Kong's Chinese University had been removed from a public piazza. 

Hong Kong's Lingnan University also took down a Tiananmen massacre wall relief sculpture that included a depiction of the "Goddess of Democracy."

Hong Kong was the only place under Chinese territory where commemorations of the 1989 Tiananmen Square protests were not barred. 

[...]

https://www.dw.com/en/hong-kong-more-universities-remove-tiananmen-monuments/a-60248522

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  • 9 months later...

"One police officer entered the consulate grounds and pulled the man who had been dragged inside back out."

So this plod will be getting fired I suppose? 

 

Edited by rmgill
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38 minutes ago, rmgill said:

"One police officer entered the consulate grounds and pulled the man who had been dragged inside back out."

So this plod will be getting fired I suppose? 

 

Maybe, if he's a regular cop. If he's Special Branch he won't.

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  • 1 year later...

A new book by American journalists has revealed that jailed activist Joshua Wong Chi-fung had not been granted political asylum by the US before the national security law was implemented on June 30, 2020.

The book Among the Braves, by former Hong Kong correspondents Shibani Mahtani of the Washington Post and Timothy McLaughlin of The Atlantic, was published Tuesday.

The book suggests that Wong, the former secretary general of opposition political group Demosisto, who had his passport confiscated due to another case, met with US consulate members in 2020 hoping to enter the diplomatic mission in Central.

The two journalists said Wong hoped to enter the consulate and seek political asylum like the Chinese civil rights activist Chen Guangcheng, who was allowed into the US embassy in 2012 in Beijing and later left for the US.

However, the meeting with Wong took place in a consulate office without consular assistance just across the road from the actual consulate on Garden Road.

"I do not want to leave. I want to go to the US consulate," the two journalists quoted Wong as saying near the end of the meeting.

But consulate members told Wong that US laws do not allow people applying for political asylum outside US soil.

The book also mentions that Wong's friend, Jeffrey Ngo Cheuk-hin, who was in the US at that time, sent an email on Wong's behalf to the then US secretary of state Mike Pompeo requesting to grant Wong political asylum.

Pompeo met with his aides within the next 48 hours to discuss Wong's request.

As the US already decided to close down China's consulate in Houston, citing efforts to steal trade secrets, the American officials were worried that China would close down the US consulate in Hong Kong as retaliation if they found out Wong was hiding in the consulate.

Pompeo also considered secretly transporting Wong out of Hong Kong by water but decided against it, as it would turn into a major international affair if they were intercepted by China's coast guards.

The book also points out that Pompeo's aides were not on the same page regarding the final decision.

Former Demosisto chairman Nathan Law Kwun-chung secretly met with Pompeo in July of the same year. He also touched on Wong's situation, but that did not alter the decision.

The book mentions that the then US president Donald Trump "liked" the idea of rolling out "lifeboat" immigration schemes for Hongkongers, allowing them to migrate to the US and become "excellent Americans." But the idea fell through under the strong objection of Trump's cabinet members.

Willy Fu Kin-chi, Hong Kong Legal Exchange Foundation's executive council vice chairman, said it is true that US laws require a person to be on US soil before allowing them to seek political asylum.

"If what the authors said are true, we can see how Wong became a forsaken pawn by the US," Fu added.

https://www.thestandard.com.hk/section-news/section/11/257678/Wong's-political-asylum-bid-rejected-by-US,-book-claims

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  • 4 weeks later...

HONG KONG (Kyodo) -- Hong Kong pro-democracy activist Agnes Chow said Sunday she has left the territory to study in Canada and has no plans to return, two years after her release from prison where she served time for inciting an unauthorized protest in 2019.

In her first public Instagram post since her release in 2021, the 27-year-old claimed she had been taken to mainland China by Hong Kong's national security police.

Chow said she was asked to write letters of repentance for what she did as well as expressing gratitude to the authorities in exchange for the return of her passport, which was confiscated upon her arrest in 2020.

Her trip to the mainland included visits to patriotic exhibitions and the headquarters of Chinese tech giant Tencent Holdings Ltd. She began her studies in Toronto in September.

As per an agreement with the police, Chow was originally scheduled to report back to Hong Kong in December, but has decided to remain in Canada for fear of being detained.

"I don't want to be forced to do what I don't want to do anymore, and I don't want to be forced to go to mainland China again," she wrote, "if it goes on like this, even if I am safe, my body and mind will collapse." Chow added she will likely never return to Hong Kong.

The Hong Kong government on Monday condemned Chow's decision in a statement, calling her behavior "irresponsible."

"The police call on (Chow) to step back from the brink," the statement said, urging her not to "take a road of no return and bear the name of 'fugitive' for the rest of her life."

In response to a question about Chow's post, Chinese Foreign Ministry spokesman Wang Wenbin said in a press conference that the rights of Hong Kong residents are fully protected under the rule of law. However, he emphasized that no one has extrajudicial privileges, saying, "Any illegal and criminal acts must be punished by law."

Since her release, Chow said she has suffered from depression and posttraumatic stress disorder, fearing that the national security police would one day show up at her door to take her away once again.

"The mixture of several emotional illnesses put my mind and body in a very unstable state, and I also knew there was nowhere for me to escape," she wrote.

Chow was convicted alongside fellow activists Joshua Wong and Ivan Lam over their involvement in the pro-democracy protest on June 21, 2019, in which mostly young protesters besieged the city's police headquarters.

The protest occurred amid an intensifying anti-government movement that was spurred by a surge of opposition to the Hong Kong government's now-withdrawn plan to allow suspects to be sent to mainland China for trial.

Chow was one of the leaders of the 2014 Umbrella Movement that called for democratic change in the former British colony. Between 2019 and 2020, she, along with Wong and other members of advocacy group Demosisto, worked to bring international attention to the city's pro-democracy movement.

Her fluent, self-taught Japanese language skills and activism via social media have helped her become popular in Japan, where some media have dubbed her the "Goddess of Democracy."

https://mainichi.jp/english/articles/20231204/p2g/00m/0in/008000c

 

An interview with her. After getting out of jail, she tried to live in HK, but coyldn't open a bank account, finding an apartment was difficult, trying to find a job was difficult, after getting her passport back, she left HK for good. If ever going back to HK, it's unsure if she be able to leave so going back is risky.  Currently on a student visa in Canada, arrived in Canada in September. Hasn't thought about seeking asylum status after student visa finishes yet though. Picked Canada for English, and other university reasons that she wouldn't go into. She has no plans for any sort of political activities for HK while outside of HK but would like to share her experience and story if asked. Even though she's in Canada, there is likely PRC secret police in Canada, in the US, and in Japan, so she still worries about her own safety. For safety reasons, she wouldn't say anything about family or friends. She felt it necessary to make an announcement of not going back to HK because if she she didn't then HK police may still assume her return and keep active as well as internationally, people would wonder. Asked if she would want to return to HK if it ever achieve democracy and well yes, but a very far and unlikely possibility. 

 

Edited by futon
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