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Date 30.12.2020

China jails 10 Hong Kong activists over border crossing

A court in China has sentenced 10 Hong Kong pro-democracy activists to up to three years in prison. Charges against two minors in the group will not be pursued.

A Chinese court on Wednesday sentenced 10 pro-democracy activists accused of trying to flee Hong Kong to between seven months and three years in jail.

The Yantian District People's Procuratorate in the southern city of Shenzhen passed the order, adding that they would also be fined.

The 10 activists were among the "Hong Kong 12" who were detained by the Chinese coast guard in August on charges of illegal border crossing as they allegedly attempted to escape Hong Kong on a boat to seek asylum in Taiwan. 

The group included two teenage activists, aged 16 and 17, who will not be charged and will be sent back to Hong Kong, the court said, adding that the two had admitted wrongdoing.

The teenagers were expected to be handed over to the Hong Kong police in a border transfer as early as Wednesday noon, news agency AFP reported.

Warning to opposition activists

Two of the adults who were suspected of organizing the crossing were sentenced to two and three years of prison time, respectively.

The court sentences appear to be a warning to anti-government protesters and activists against trying to evade enforcement of the tough new national security law imposed on the semi-autonomous Hong Kong by Beijing in June. 

Hong Kong has already frozen assets and issued arrest warrants for several government opponents who have fled abroad. 

The US and several European nations have called for the 12 activists to be released and returned to Hong Kong, saying their trial was not fair. 

https://www.dw.com/en/china-jails-10-hong-kong-activists-over-border-crossing/a-56090269

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2 hours ago, Leo Niehorster said:

Clean up Hong Kong and bring it in line with the rest of China.

Yes, but if he is worried about dissent, its his own actions that created this dissent.

There was no groundswell of desire from Hong Kong to change China. They just wanted to be left the hell alone. Its like smashing up your HDTV , because you dont want it stolen by burglars.

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I think they can simply not stand the thought of independent people under their rule. Xi is a perfect Totalitarian in his mindset. Not necessarily murderous, but uncompromising even to the point of self-mutilation.

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47 minutes ago, Stuart Galbraith said:

Yes, but if he is worried about dissent, its his own actions that created this dissent.

There was no groundswell of desire from Hong Kong to change China. They just wanted to be left the hell alone. Its like smashing up your HDTV , because you dont want it stolen by burglars.

Compared to the rest of the mainland, HK was a more open society, had AFAIK regular access to Facebook and Youtube, sites that are nearly banned in the mainland. Bookstores of course could sell books that would normally be more critical of the mainland government than any mainland outlet would be permitted to do. Yet HK was still an important business center even if its city scale GDP no longer remained the largest in comparison to other PRC cities. So there's probably quite a lot of traffic of mainlander going back and fourth into HK so its almost like having their population going to a foreign country from the perspective of mainland leaders (like Ssnake pointed out just before I hit post). And foreigners had greater freedom in HK as well so that too would serve as a possible thorn to long term thinkers in CCP China, particularly under Xi, that have a never ending appetite in extending their control more and more.

 

One side of me could see how the mainland would want to get rid of the 1 country 2 system policy for an area that has been part of Chinese dynasties since 200 BC. But then comes the rub about CCP China being something that no one would willingly want to go into (except for foolish outsiders that live far away and so don't know the reality like those that live up close; Tibet, Xinjiang, HK, Taiwan, Vietnam, ROK, Japan). ISTR that that Hong Kongers had a chunk in the role of the Tiananmen Square protests. If the mainland had transitioned to looser speech control, then the end of 1 country 2 systems in HK would be less objectionable to HKers. Original HK population continues the shrink though and gradually gets filled up with mainlanders in place and now the exodus of original HKers is going to increase a lot. So at some point, the pro-democratic/status que/independence HK population that makes up about 3 or 4 out of 5 of the population is going to dwindle to about 50% under less freedom environment and that'll be the end of it. Back to the dynasty, even if CCP.

 

Perhaps some may figure a similar cookie cutter fits for the next step as well, which is Taiwan. To which it is not. Different history and circumstances.  And I hope Japan points any of its to be developed anti-ship missiles with ranges of 900, 1500, and 2000km for Taiwan's defense.

Edited by JasonJ
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2 minutes ago, Stuart Galbraith said:

All they had to do was keep a border around Hong Kong. What they had worked. But in trying to make it work THEIR way, they have probably destroyed the City's future.

I know, Chicoms will be Chicom's. I guess HK were lucky we held onto it as long as we did.

Times were changing so difficult to hold beyond '97. The HKers themselves put up a hell of a fight to bring up to 2020.

 

Send a message to the Chicoms with QE. Apply a multiplier effect by doing it with RR or Izumo. Then enjoy the lashback similar to what the Aussies got recently.

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1 hour ago, Ssnake said:

I think they can simply not stand the thought of independent people under their rule. Xi is a perfect Totalitarian in his mindset. Not necessarily murderous, but uncompromising even to the point of self-mutilation.

What happened to Hong Kong was predictable -  Rome cannot bear a Capua. 

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Stuart All they had to do was keep a border around Hong Kong. What they had worked. But in trying to make it work THEIR way, they have probably destroyed the City's future.

Hong Kong's future is destroyed, is it?  :^)  The CCP does not "keep a border" around a Chinese city.  If they caved to the protestors in Hong Kong, they would simply invite the same elsewhere, including and especially in Taiwan.

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2 hours ago, Stuart Galbraith said:

 in trying to make it work THEIR way, they have probably destroyed the City's future.

No, Stuart, that's hyperbole. They changed the city's future to a potentially less prosperous and decidedly less liberal one, but then again, that was quite the point of it. They will squeeze out those whose minds have been irrevocably infected with the freedom virus, and replace them with people who don't know better. And the rest of Hong Kong citizens will simply shut up and hope for the best (IOW, adopt the default Chinese lifestyle).

The Communist Party in China tolerates different opinion, as long as it remains inconsequential (IOW, as long as they aren't made heard).

China's Hong Kong policy is not about Hong Kong, it's about China. That's the myopia that befell the Democracy Movement of Hong Kong. Anything but the curret outcome would have been the surprise.

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No, it's not hyperbole. Hong Kong was the historic link between Asian Financial institutions and the west. It's like expecting American stock markets to retain their importance if wall street disappeared. I'll grant you Shanghai is of emerging importance, but HK was the place western banks went to trade with China.  Nobody has the faintest idea what effect this will have on that relationship, but it's unlikely to be a positive one. 

It's not about China, it's about Xi stamping his fairly clueless foot on a problem he created entirely by his own actions.

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You're 20 years behind the times Stuart.  At one point Hong Kong was like a turbo helping kick start the Chinese mainland because it, (like Taiwan) was more imbued with Western business culture.  No more.  The Chinese mainland is now fully up to speed on how to do business with the world.  Here's the GDP breakdown of Chinese cities.  Hong Kong is very impressive, but hardly indespensible,

 

List of Chinese prefecture-level cities by GDP per capita - Wikipedia

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1 hour ago, Stuart Galbraith said:

HK was the place western banks went to trade with China.

And they will continue to be the place where western banks will trade with China. That China is Communist Asshole Territory hasn't stopped anyone dealing with them, as long as the deals are profitable.

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4 minutes ago, Ssnake said:

And they will continue to be the place where western banks will trade with China. That China is Communist Asshole Territory hasn't stopped anyone dealing with them, as long as the deals are profitable.

Moreover as the PRC is not hobbled by CO2 emission quotas. Despite being the new factory of the world, it is still considered a developing country in that regard.

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Hong Kong media tycoon Jimmy Lai ordered back to jail

Published 5 hours ago

Hong Kong pro-democracy mogul Jimmy Lai has been ordered back to prison after the city's highest court ruled a judge may have erred in granting him bail.

The Apple Daily founder is accused of conspiring with foreign forces to endanger national security.

The 73-year old had spent the last week under house arrest after securing bail, but prosecutors appealed.

He is a fierce critic of China and the highest profile person charged under Hong Kong's controversial security law.

What did the court say?

Mr Lai has been in and out of detention over recent months. The Court of Final Appeal set his next bail hearing for 1 February after the prosecution argued a judge should not have released him on bail.

"We consider it reasonably arguable in the present case that the learned judge may have erred," the judges said in their ruling.

They cited Article 42 of the security law which states that "no bail shall be granted to a criminal suspect or defendant unless the judge has sufficient grounds for believing that the criminal suspect or defendant will not continue to commit acts endangering national security".

Mr Lai was first arrested under the law in August after a police raid on Apple Daily's head office, but was released on bail.

However, he was again placed in custody on 2 December, after being denied bail on a separate charge of fraud related to the lease of a building that houses the newspaper.

He was charged under the security law on 11 December and granted bail a second time on 23 December. Prosecutors immediately sought leave to appeal.

[...]

https://www.bbc.com/news/world-asia-china-55496039

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1 hour ago, BansheeOne said:

"We consider it reasonably arguable in the present case that the learned judge may have erred," the judges said in their ruling.

Cue a mandatory session of self-criticism to improve society.

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Posted (edited)

I missed this when it first was posted up 5 months ago. Apparently 2 Chinese Generals (retired I think) have been expressing displeasure with Xi's handling of international relations. Which is interesting, because both of them were classed as hawks.

https://youtu.be/QkGojp1dE08

Basically, they see China's long rise to ascendency being spoiled by a guy who wants everything to happen on his watch so he can get the glory. Which of course worked out perfectly when Mao or the Emperor Chin did it.

Edited by Stuart Galbraith
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On 12/30/2020 at 8:52 AM, JasonJ said:

Compared to the rest of the mainland, HK was a more open society, had AFAIK regular access to Facebook and Youtube, sites that are nearly banned in the mainland. Bookstores of course could sell books that would normally be more critical of the mainland government than any mainland outlet would be permitted to do. Yet HK was still an important business center even if its city scale GDP no longer remained the largest in comparison to other PRC cities. So there's probably quite a lot of traffic of mainlander going back and fourth into HK so its almost like having their population going to a foreign country from the perspective of mainland leaders (like Ssnake pointed out just before I hit post). And foreigners had greater freedom in HK as well so that too would serve as a possible thorn to long term thinkers in CCP China, particularly under Xi, that have a never ending appetite in extending their control more and more.

 

One side of me could see how the mainland would want to get rid of the 1 country 2 system policy for an area that has been part of Chinese dynasties since 200 BC. But then comes the rub about CCP China being something that no one would willingly want to go into (except for foolish outsiders that live far away and so don't know the reality like those that live up close; Tibet, Xinjiang, HK, Taiwan, Vietnam, ROK, Japan). ISTR that that Hong Kongers had a chunk in the role of the Tiananmen Square protests. If the mainland had transitioned to looser speech control, then the end of 1 country 2 systems in HK would be less objectionable to HKers. Original HK population continues the shrink though and gradually gets filled up with mainlanders in place and now the exodus of original HKers is going to increase a lot. So at some point, the pro-democratic/status que/independence HK population that makes up about 3 or 4 out of 5 of the population is going to dwindle to about 50% under less freedom environment and that'll be the end of it. Back to the dynasty, even if CCP.

 

Perhaps some may figure a similar cookie cutter fits for the next step as well, which is Taiwan. To which it is not. Different history and circumstances.  And I hope Japan points any of its to be developed anti-ship missiles with ranges of 900, 1500, and 2000km for Taiwan's defense.

Jason, at one time -- early 20th century? -- wasn't Shanghai on par with Hong Kong for economic and cultural issues?

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15 minutes ago, Stuart Galbraith said:

I missed this when it first was posted up 5 months ago. Apparently 2 Chinese Generals (retired I think) have been expressing displeasure with Xi's handling of international relations. Which is interesting, because both of them were classed as hawks.

https://youtu.be/QkGojp1dE08

Basically, they see China's long rise to ascendency being spoiled by a guy who wants everything to happen on his watch so he can get the glory. Which of course worked out perfectly when Mao or the Emperor Chin did it.

Good pick up.

Found this by one of the generals.

https://gnews.org/257994/

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9 minutes ago, Rick said:

Jason, at one time -- early 20th century? -- wasn't Shanghai on par with Hong Kong for economic and cultural issues?

Oh geez you got me with one I don't really know. My impression has been that Shanghai was one of the better performing cities. I reckon the sub-Han ethnicity central to the Shanghai area would surely have been more characteristically culturally distinguishable back then than it is today. Long gone member Chino (technically Singaporean) talked about that Shanghai identity a bit.

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