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A Lady Liberty Hong Kong statue in the works.

A group has successfully raised funds for a four-metre-tall pro-democracy statue called Lady Liberty Hong Kong.

 

The team behind the idea are from the arts and design sector. They gathered on the Reddit-like LIHKG forum and conducted a vote among users, asking them to choose one of eight designs.

 

On Tuesday, they launched a crowdfunding campaign, which reached HK$203,933 within six hours.

 

[...]

https://www.hongkongfp.com/2019/08/31/plan-lady-liberty-hong-kong-pro-democracy-statue-surpasses-hk200k-crowdfunding-goal-within-hours/

 

 

I missed this one but the statue was finished by September 10th. I don't know, I think a more graceful design with symbolic elements to represent parts of their cause and endeavor rather then the literal bluntness of demonstrator gear would have been nicer.

 

It was taken up on top of Lion Rock Mountain today, suffering a broken wrist at the hand that held the banner.

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Don't know where this one is, but same kind of pattern.

For me, former Soviet child with legacy of numerous ceremonies with Red flag, all this modern China dance with flag, rehearsed folding-unfolding etc. is very much US tradition influence. In USSR of my childhood it was way more simple, not to mention kindergarden-age children newer taking part.

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Don't know where this one is, but same kind of pattern.

 

 

For me, former Soviet child with legacy of numerous ceremonies with Red flag, all this modern China dance with flag, rehearsed folding-unfolding etc. is very much US tradition influence. In USSR of my childhood it was way more simple, not to mention kindergarden-age children newer taking part.

But surely there were other kinds of ceremonious affairs to make up for the lack of flag ceremonies.

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But surely there were other kinds of ceremonious affairs to make up for the lack of flag ceremonies.

 

Not so much as most Western audience believe. Soviet education system was quite conservative and classic literature-based, with access to modern Western mass culture limited, and as result it was quite normal for Soviet children to play in Lincoln island (after Jules Vern books) and Tom Sawyer & Co etc. Our generation childhood was way more free and cheerful than of our kids - you could consider entire USSR as child-friendly gated community. We were playing on the streets alone for all day without mobile phone or other tool of parents control, crime was only in action movies for most of us, our parents were not concerned about possibility of loosing jobs etc.

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HK police stabbed in the neck from behind during a police pull back move. At the hospital and said to be stable.

 

A Hong Kong police officer was stabbed in the neck on Sunday in one of the worst acts of violence against the authorities during the 19th straight weekend of civil unrest in the global financial hub.

 

Graphic footage emerged of the policeman being stabbed in the neck from behind with a sharp object as his team retreated towards Kwun Tong metro station.

 

The police confirmed that two people had been arrested at the scene and the officer had been transferred to hospital “in a conscious state” and was stable.

 

A police source said that the officer had sustained a 3cm cut to his neck, and while it was still hard to confirm the extent of his injuries, that the attack was “one of the worst” when seen “in terms of malice, in terms of an attempt to kill the officer.”

 

Flash mob-style protests had initially peacefully in multiple locations with small groups of a few hundred people chanting “Free Hong Kong” slogans but soon developed into chaotic clashes with the riot police as more radical black-clad activists trashed shops and erected barricades on busy roads.

 

Dozens were reportedly injured, numerous arrests were made and tear gas was deployed to disperse protesters, although the police said “minimum force” was used. As night fell, about 20 Molotov cocktails were thrown at a police station in Mongkok in Kowloon.

 

Earlier in the day, protesters played a game of cat-and-mouse with riot officers in Mongkok’s busy shopping district – blocking roads with metal railings and bamboo sticks, only to disappear into a warren of side streets when police vans arrived to clear the way.

 

The Telegraph witnessed at least two rough arrests and an injured officer on the ground on the main thoroughfare of Nathan Road. One bystander claimed that a young man had been detained simply for being alone in the wrong place at the wrong time.

 

Crowds of residents surrounded the police, hurling insults and accusing them of being “mafia,” jeering as the vans pulled away and giving officers the finger. Video footage of an officer being floored by a protester’s flying kick during another attempted arrest in the area went viral.

 

Elsewhere, the ongoing anti-government protests, which began in opposition to a controversial extradition bill but have now widened into an appeal for universal suffrage and greater democracy, played out more peacefully.

https://www.google.co.jp/amp/s/www.telegraph.co.uk/news/2019/10/13/police-officer-stabbed-neck-latest-hong-kong-clashes/amp/

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But surely there were other kinds of ceremonious affairs to make up for the lack of flag ceremonies.

 

Not so much as most Western audience believe. Soviet education system was quite conservative and classic literature-based, with access to modern Western mass culture limited, and as result it was quite normal for Soviet children to play in Lincoln island (after Jules Vern books) and Tom Sawyer & Co etc. Our generation childhood was way more free and cheerful than of our kids - you could consider entire USSR as child-friendly gated community. We were playing on the streets alone for all day without mobile phone or other tool of parents control, crime was only in action movies for most of us, our parents were not concerned about possibility of loosing jobs etc.

 

 

Roman, I cant speak for your generation, but previous ones certainly were dragged into ceremony. What you perceive as an American influence on the part of the Chinese, would appear to be not far removed from Stalinist traditions.

At the 25 minute mark.

 

I will say to be fair, the Chinese model would appear to be an effort to unify a nation, in itself a somewhat interesting statement on how China feels threatened by dissent. The Soviet idea (which I believe you have discussed before) was more tolerant of divergent traditions, which of course came spectacularly home to roost in 1991. The trend to be less nation centric and more marxist-leninist centric in that context makes some sense.

 

But there was clearly ceremony with it, even if that was before your time.

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Xi Jinping: “Anyone attempting to split China in any part of the country will end in crushed bodies and shattered bones,” he told Nepal’s prime minister, KP Sharma Oli, in a meeting on Sunday, according to China’s state broadcaster CCTV.

 

 

 

Chinese president Xi Jinping has warned that any attempt to divide China will be crushed, as Beijing faces political challenges in months-long protests in Hong Kong and US criticism over its treatment of Muslim minority groups.

“Anyone attempting to split China in any part of the country will end in crushed bodies and shattered bones,” he told Nepal’s prime minister, KP Sharma Oli, in a meeting on Sunday, according to China’s state broadcaster CCTV.

“And any external forces backing such attempts dividing China will be deemed by the Chinese people as pipe-dreaming,” he was quoted as saying.

Xi, the first Chinese president to visit Nepal in 22 years, arrived in the country on Saturday on a state visit. Both sides are expected to sign a deal expanding a railway link between the Himalayan nation and Tibet.

Oli told Xi the country would oppose any “anti-China activities” on its soil, CCTV reported.

China, which is trying to de-escalate a protracted trade war with the US, has seen its political authority tested by increasingly violent protests in Hong Kong against what is seen as Beijing’s tightening grip on the Chinese-ruled city.

Police in Hong Kong have used rubber bullets, tear gas and water cannon against pro-democracy demonstrators in the former British colony, which has been plunged into its worst political crisis in decades.

US president Donald Trump had said it would be difficult to negotiate with China if anything “bad” happens in its handling of the Hong Kong protests.

Trump said he discussed Hong Kong with Chinese vice premier Liu He on Saturday during their latest round of talks. Both sides reached a “phase-one deal” that has raised optimism for a broader agreement although many fundamental issues remained unresolved and existing tariffs are still not lifted.

Washington last week also blacklisted 28 Chinese companies over Beijing’s treatment of predominantly Muslim ethnic minorities. China has faced growing international condemnation for over mass detention camps that are believed to hold more than 1 million ethnic Uighurs and other Muslims.

Before arriving in Nepal, Xi was in India for talks with Indian prime minister Narendra Modi to try to mend ties over the disputed Himalayan region of Kashmir amid scattered anti-China protests from Tibetan groups.

China sent troops into remote, mountainous Tibet in 1950 in what it officially calls a peaceful liberation and has ruled there with an iron fist ever since.

The Dalai Lama, Tibet’s spiritual leader, fled to India in 1959 after a failed uprising against Chinese rule. China brands him a dangerous reactionary seeking to split off nearly a quarter of the Chinese land mass.

https://www.theguardian.com/world/2019/oct/14/threatening-china-will-end-in-crushed-bodies-says-xi-jinping-amid-hong-kong-protests

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Thousands gather at Charter Garden for awaiting the vote by the U.S. House on Hong Kong Human Rights and Democracy Act to take place on October 15th.

chartergarden.jpg

 

 

 

HONG KONG - Thousands of pro-democracy protesters gathered at Hong Kong's Chater Garden in Central district on Monday evening (Oct 14) for the first rally that has been approved since a face mask ban came into effect on Oct 5.

The crowd swelled from earlier hundreds to occupy the garden and spilled to surrounding areas.

Many of them, not wearing masks but donning black tops, chanted slogans like "It's my right to wear a mask" and "fan gong" or anti-communism in Cantonese.

This rally was called in support of the Hong Kong Human Rights and Democracy Act, a proposed US legislation aimed at reviewing Hong Kong's special trading status and potentially sanctioning some Chinese officials.

Among the attendees was Ms Daisy Chan, 28, who wore a face mask and said since this is an approved rally, there is no need to be afraid. The clerk works in New Territories and specially made her way down to Central to show her support.

Asked if the face mask ban would prompt her to shift from a peaceful protester to the frontlines, Ms Chan said: “I didn't have the courage so I won’t go to the frontlines but I will come out in my capacity as a peaceful protester, even if I’ve to wear a mask I will also turn up.”

Hong Kong has been reeling from often massive and violent protests since June against what is seen as Beijing’s tightening grip on the Chinese-ruled city.

The protests were triggered by a now-abandoned extradition Bill but have widened into a pro-democracy movement and an outlet for anger at social inequality in the city, which was ranked in January as the world’s least affordable housing market for a ninth consecutive year by a global survey, Demographia International Housing Affordability Study.

 

 

https://www.straitstimes.com/asia/east-asia/thousands-of-pro-democracy-protesters-throng-hong-kongs-chater-garden

Edited by JasonJ
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But surely there were other kinds of ceremonious affairs to make up for the lack of flag ceremonies.

 

Not so much as most Western audience believe. Soviet education system was quite conservative and classic literature-based, with access to modern Western mass culture limited, and as result it was quite normal for Soviet children to play in Lincoln island (after Jules Vern books) and Tom Sawyer & Co etc. Our generation childhood was way more free and cheerful than of our kids - you could consider entire USSR as child-friendly gated community. We were playing on the streets alone for all day without mobile phone or other tool of parents control, crime was only in action movies for most of us, our parents were not concerned about possibility of loosing jobs etc.

 

 

Roman, I cant speak for your generation, but previous ones certainly were dragged into ceremony. What you perceive as an American influence on the part of the Chinese, would appear to be not far removed from Stalinist traditions.

At the 25 minute mark.

 

I will say to be fair, the Chinese model would appear to be an effort to unify a nation, in itself a somewhat interesting statement on how China feels threatened by dissent. The Soviet idea (which I believe you have discussed before) was more tolerant of divergent traditions, which of course came spectacularly home to roost in 1991. The trend to be less nation centric and more marxist-leninist centric in that context makes some sense.

 

But there was clearly ceremony with it, even if that was before your time.

 

 

It does seem similar to ceremonies performed in American elementary school classrooms, participation in which was enforced by teachers who may or may not have been interested in doing so.

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But surely there were other kinds of ceremonious affairs to make up for the lack of flag ceremonies.

 

Not so much as most Western audience believe. Soviet education system was quite conservative and classic literature-based, with access to modern Western mass culture limited, and as result it was quite normal for Soviet children to play in Lincoln island (after Jules Vern books) and Tom Sawyer & Co etc. Our generation childhood was way more free and cheerful than of our kids - you could consider entire USSR as child-friendly gated community. We were playing on the streets alone for all day without mobile phone or other tool of parents control, crime was only in action movies for most of us, our parents were not concerned about possibility of loosing jobs etc.

 

 

Roman, I cant speak for your generation, but previous ones certainly were dragged into ceremony. What you perceive as an American influence on the part of the Chinese, would appear to be not far removed from Stalinist traditions.

At the 25 minute mark.

 

I will say to be fair, the Chinese model would appear to be an effort to unify a nation, in itself a somewhat interesting statement on how China feels threatened by dissent. The Soviet idea (which I believe you have discussed before) was more tolerant of divergent traditions, which of course came spectacularly home to roost in 1991. The trend to be less nation centric and more marxist-leninist centric in that context makes some sense.

 

But there was clearly ceremony with it, even if that was before your time.

 

 

It does seem similar to ceremonies performed in American elementary school classrooms, participation in which was enforced by teachers who may or may not have been interested in doing so.

 

 

The only thing I remember was saying the pledge of allegiance every morning. No Hitlerjugend type activities that I can recall. :huh:

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But surely there were other kinds of ceremonious affairs to make up for the lack of flag ceremonies.

 

Not so much as most Western audience believe. Soviet education system was quite conservative and classic literature-based, with access to modern Western mass culture limited, and as result it was quite normal for Soviet children to play in Lincoln island (after Jules Vern books) and Tom Sawyer & Co etc. Our generation childhood was way more free and cheerful than of our kids - you could consider entire USSR as child-friendly gated community. We were playing on the streets alone for all day without mobile phone or other tool of parents control, crime was only in action movies for most of us, our parents were not concerned about possibility of loosing jobs etc.

 

 

Roman, I cant speak for your generation, but previous ones certainly were dragged into ceremony. What you perceive as an American influence on the part of the Chinese, would appear to be not far removed from Stalinist traditions.

At the 25 minute mark.

 

I will say to be fair, the Chinese model would appear to be an effort to unify a nation, in itself a somewhat interesting statement on how China feels threatened by dissent. The Soviet idea (which I believe you have discussed before) was more tolerant of divergent traditions, which of course came spectacularly home to roost in 1991. The trend to be less nation centric and more marxist-leninist centric in that context makes some sense.

 

But there was clearly ceremony with it, even if that was before your time.

 

 

It does seem similar to ceremonies performed in American elementary school classrooms, participation in which was enforced by teachers who may or may not have been interested in doing so.

 

 

The only thing I remember was saying the pledge of allegiance every morning. No Hitlerjugend type activities that I can recall. :huh:

 

"that was before your time" :)

 

1440x960.jpg

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Roman, I cant speak for your generation, but previous ones certainly were dragged into ceremony. What you perceive as an American influence on the part of the Chinese, would appear to be not far removed from Stalinist traditions.

At the 25 minute mark.

 

I will say to be fair, the Chinese model would appear to be an effort to unify a nation, in itself a somewhat interesting statement on how China feels threatened by dissent. The Soviet idea (which I believe you have discussed before) was more tolerant of divergent traditions, which of course came spectacularly home to roost in 1991. The trend to be less nation centric and more marxist-leninist centric in that context makes some sense.

 

But there was clearly ceremony with it, even if that was before your time.

It does seem similar to ceremonies performed in American elementary school classrooms, participation in which was enforced by teachers who may or may not have been interested in doing so.

The only thing I remember was saying the pledge of allegiance every morning. No Hitlerjugend type activities that I can recall. :huh:

Its difficult for some to determine the difference between a pledge of a two party political system country and a flag ceremony of a single party system countries and all the other differences that come along with it. Some also struggle to differentiate between elementary schools and kindergartens.

Edited by JasonJ
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But surely there were other kinds of ceremonious affairs to make up for the lack of flag ceremonies.

 

Not so much as most Western audience believe. Soviet education system was quite conservative and classic literature-based, with access to modern Western mass culture limited, and as result it was quite normal for Soviet children to play in Lincoln island (after Jules Vern books) and Tom Sawyer & Co etc. Our generation childhood was way more free and cheerful than of our kids - you could consider entire USSR as child-friendly gated community. We were playing on the streets alone for all day without mobile phone or other tool of parents control, crime was only in action movies for most of us, our parents were not concerned about possibility of loosing jobs etc.

Roman, I cant speak for your generation, but previous ones certainly were dragged into ceremony. What you perceive as an American influence on the part of the Chinese, would appear to be not far removed from Stalinist traditions.

At the 25 minute mark.

 

I will say to be fair, the Chinese model would appear to be an effort to unify a nation, in itself a somewhat interesting statement on how China feels threatened by dissent. The Soviet idea (which I believe you have discussed before) was more tolerant of divergent traditions, which of course came spectacularly home to roost in 1991. The trend to be less nation centric and more marxist-leninist centric in that context makes some sense.

 

But there was clearly ceremony with it, even if that was before your time.

It does seem similar to ceremonies performed in American elementary school classrooms, participation in which was enforced by teachers who may or may not have been interested in doing so.

The only thing I remember was saying the pledge of allegiance every morning. No Hitlerjugend type activities that I can recall. :huh:

"that was before your time" :)

 

1440x960.jpg

Some of the more enthusiastic teachers in elementary school took the standing for, recitation of, and facing of pupils toward the flag during the pledge of allegiance more seriously than others. Baseball hats off. Edited by Nobu
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Its difficult for some to determine the difference between a pledge of a two party political system country and a flag ceremony of a single party system countries and all the other differences that come along with it. Some also struggle to differentiate between elementary schools and kindergartens.

 

It's pretty simple. Can you voice opposition to the party in power without having police show up at your door? That's the difference.

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