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Here's A Spaag I Never Saw Before.


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Was it me or did the 3.7" look like the cruciform base was broken or not assembled properly?


And yeah, that 2 pounder Pop-pom used in the land role seems like a nifty thing but the smaller quantity of powder probably limited it's AT effectiveness.


The 105mm's carriage seems VERY WWI in form

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Check out the British WW2 awesomeness 2:30 into this video. I hadn't seen the 105mm field gun shown later in the video before either.

Vicker 6 ton chassis, likley a prototype for the interwar exercises. Good find, i am playing out a scenario in my head where I fund armour development in Canada 1935-1939. Starting with the Vicker 6 ton> A10>Valentine the last two equipped with a 6 pdr. I was toying with the idea of a APC based on the Vickers 6-ton. Now I have more to chew on. One of the AT guns they mention as a 2pdr I think was actually a 25mm, as i recall the UK had some prior to the 2 pdr coming into service. Notice they don't talk much about the 2 pdr or the Boyes AT, guess they are still semi-secret.

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I was pretty sure it was a 1 pounder pom pom which would be pretty useless as an AT weapon too for the reason you state. The carriage on the 105mm however looks more WW2 to me due to the split trail design.

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Yes, there's something wrong with the base on the 3.7. I was pretty sure it was a 1 pounder pom pom which would be pretty useless as an AT weapon too for the reason you state. The carriage on the 105mm however looks more WW2 to me due to the split trail design.

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The first AT gun appears to be the French 25mm, and it was tractor borne because if it was towed it fell apart.

 

The 3.7in gun did not have its stakes driven into the ground.

 

And I loved the idea of the Bren being used as secondary armament of a Bofors.

 

I suspect that this film is either not from 1940, more likely 1937 or so. If was from 1940, it is more likely to be a deliberate attempt to disguise exactly what the Brits had available, ie, only the briefest oblique mention of the 2pdr, nothing of the 25pdr and the 9.2in coastal guns had better protection by 1939, The 9.2in howitzer being a WW1 weapon, widely understood to be outdated.

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...

And I loved the idea of the Bren being used as secondary armament of a Bofors.

...

 

Training aide, mostly for practising shooting at ground target.

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The105 looks very French...i'll check books when home.

Also possibly one of the 1920/30s Vickers 105mm guns. They varied from a L/22 howitzer to a IIRC L/40 high velocity gun, but I don't know anything more.

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"The first AT gun appears to be the French 25mm, and it was tractor borne because if it was towed it fell apart"--DougRichards

Those cartridges did look a bit...dainty. :P

What caught my eye during the Bren demo at about 5:00 was the A-gunner using the spare barrel to steady himself as he climbed out of the ditch.

That pom-pom should be dandy for dealing with infantry.

Edited by shep854
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The105 looks very French...i'll check books when home.

Also possibly one of the 1920/30s Vickers 105mm guns. They varied from a L/22 howitzer to a IIRC L/40 high velocity gun, but I don't know anything more.

 

 

There was a Vickers BL 4.1in howitzer produced in 1931, with a box trail, and tested on Salisbury Plain, but as usual money played a part and it was decided that it was better to spend the pounds on one gun-howitzer rather than a gun and a howitzer. There were two split trail mountings considered, one from Woolwich and one from Vickers, Both were considered unwieldy, but caused the box trail from the earlier 4.1in (ie 105mm) to be revived for the 3.45in (ie 25pdr) gun. Source - Hogg.

 

The howitzer in the film appears to be one of the latter split trail mountings, which would also tend to show that the film was not of 1940 vintage, those particular pieces of footage probably being from 1935. Also note that no cartridge is ejected from the split trail weapon, which may indicate that this is a BL rather than a QF weapon.

 

The tracked tractors being used for some of the 18pdrs (not all, some having wheeled tractors) appear to be Vickers Light Dragons, which were out of service by 1938, never being more than an experimental type with some field service.

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Can anyone identify the dates of the uniforms? Particularly the large peaked caps with white tops of the gunners? They definitely do not seem 'at war' 1940.

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Can anyone identify the dates of the uniforms? Particularly the large peaked caps with white tops of the gunners? They definitely do not seem 'at war' 1940.

 

They look like naval personnel in the film in the OP to me. considering they are shooting a QF 2 pdr. on that tracked vehicle, it would have made sense to utilize a RN gun crew already trained in its use.

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Can anyone identify the dates of the uniforms? Particularly the large peaked caps with white tops of the gunners? They definitely do not seem 'at war' 1940.

 

They look like naval personnel in the film in the OP to me. considering they are shooting a QF 2 pdr. on that tracked vehicle, it would have made sense to utilize a RN gun crew already trained in its use.

 

 

I'm pretty sure it's a 1 pounder.

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Can anyone identify the dates of the uniforms? Particularly the large peaked caps with white tops of the gunners? They definitely do not seem 'at war' 1940.

 

They look like naval personnel in the film in the OP to me. considering they are shooting a QF 2 pdr. on that tracked vehicle, it would have made sense to utilize a RN gun crew already trained in its use.

 

 

I'm pretty sure it's a 1 pounder.

 

I would have to agree as the army only adopted 2pdr AA pom poms on elaborate two gun naval mountings, and that was in 1936, at the same meeting it was decided to obtain 40mm Bofors.

 

The one pdr was 37mm, but on wiki there is a very short reference, just the name really, of a QF 1.5pdr British AA gun.

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