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Keep in mind the maximum distance a Israel IFV is expected to operate in for the most part, is likley within 40km of the border.

Which is completely irrelevant for the vehicle's design, or the structure of its support chain.

It's incredibly relevant to any vehicle the Israelis build. Literately they can truck the vehicle back to the factory from the frontline within hours. A vehicle used by an expeditionary force may have very limited ability to fix or repair various items and only limited stocks of parts. The Israelis can "tune" their vehicles to the terrain and threat they know that they will face. Countries like Canada, UK or a force like the USMC may not know where they be fighting next.

And how do you think this translates to the design of the vehicle itself?

Because I don't see any way it does.

 

For an Israeli armored unit, the supply of parts and ability to recover, is not as immediate as you may think.

And for an expeditionary unit, the ability to maintain their vehicles is not necessarily as bad as you suggest.

 

Any Israeli armored unit, can be called to fight either in the sandy and empty plains of Sinai against Egypt (low probability), in the urban environment of Gaza (very high probability), the rocky and muddy fields of southern Syria (medium probability), or the very complex Lebanese terrain of mountains, narrow passages, and semi-urban towns (high probability).

 

Each of them offers different logistical challenges, and the IDF is only in early stages of developing solutions to properly supply its troops in all these settings.

 

But if the circumstances necessitate it, the IDF possesses the capability to conduct complex logistical operations over much longer ranges than merely 40km beyond its border.

 

Currently it is in the process of setting up at least 10 spearhead BCTs, and 3 SF BCTs.

A typical BCT is larger than a typical brigade.

If the largest brigade in the IDF has 5 battalions, then that would be the size of your typical BCT.

 

3 BCTs are going to have the capability to deploy much farther than the spearheading BCTs, and will be composed of various commando and paratrooper units.

 

Now back to the US. What you're talking about is only relevant for the USMC, not US Army.

The typical MEU has 4 tanks, 7 LAVs, and 14 AAVs, or in other words 4 tanks, 7 IFVs, and 14 APCs. That's a total of 25 AFVs that need support and maintenance.

They are further supported by 4 artillery guns.

 

To supply them, they have at their disposal:

5x LCAC.

2x LCU.

7x LVSR.

30x MTVR.

4x CH-53K.

3x UH-1Y.

 

Of course, the heavy lift helicopters may be needed to resupply the aerial assets with engines and munitions. But in total you have approximately a shit ton of logistical assets to provide for a not too large ground force.

That is, per capita, a whole lot more than the IDF can allocate to its own forces.

And of course, just like the IDF will be setting up FOBs during fighting, so will the USMC.

 

They can afford certain complexities and reduce robustness to minimize costs. They can also risk a little more. A large army like the US weighs logistical changes for the weight placed on the whole system (see Sherman debate). A small military like Canada is very reluctant to adapt as the we can't afford the supply chain and maintaining multiple vehicle types overseas.

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Related questions sort of - how optimal is the MBT 120 mm for the various types of combat the IDF can anticipate

Right now, the 120mm is great. Not only for the IDF but entirety of NATO.

And I do want to remind that Israel and NATO have very close considerations for this question.

 

If new T-90M and T-14 are likely to appear in eastern Europe, then T-90M are also highly likely to appear in the middle east.

The T-14 also has a fairly high chance of making an appearance in the middle east once it hits critical numbers in Europe.

 

That's why Israel may cooperate with the Franco-German EMBT project and the US's NGCV project, in efforts to determine the next gun.

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Related questions sort of - how optimal is the MBT 120 mm for the various types of combat the IDF can anticipate

Right now, the 120mm is great. Not only for the IDF but entirety of NATO.

And I do want to remind that Israel and NATO have very close considerations for this question.

 

If new T-90M and T-14 are likely to appear in eastern Europe, then T-90M are also highly likely to appear in the middle east.

The T-14 also has a fairly high chance of making an appearance in the middle east once it hits critical numbers in Europe.

 

That's why Israel may cooperate with the Franco-German EMBT project and the US's NGCV project, in efforts to determine the next gun.

 

against tank I cannot imagine a problem but for urban renewal ... how many building with crappy walls will a round go through

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https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=0qpZ9pmZJJ0

 

An Elbit UK representative says Elbit will take part in the UK's bid for a new howitzer.

 

It's worth reminding that Elbit offers its ATMOS in two main variants (and more sub-variants) - open cabin, and turreted.

The latter, they previously said, can be integrated on any user-provided platform and is platform-agnostic.

 

Elbit also has a working prototype of a turreted system for quite a while, but in a rather unusual step has refrained from showing it. It has only shown so far a nearly completely stripped down system, which raises doubts on its policy of showcasing developments, especially as the turret is marketable.

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What is the Merkava 4 Barak?

 

 

Some news:

  1. 188th brigade has been selected to receive the new Merkava 4 Barack MBTs, starting 2021.
  2. The 401st brigade is currently receiving new Merkava 4M tanks with an unspecified improved FCS.
  3. The 847th brigade completed the transition of one battalion and is in the process of transitioning the remaining 2 battalions to the Merkava 4 (without Trophy).
  4. The 434th brigade has received new BMS for all its tanks.
  5. Development of the Merkava 4 Barack is said to be in full swing.

 

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It has come to my understanding that the IDF has 11-15 billion dollar acquisition programs (over 5 years) on hold that are pending election results, including the howitzer program and other AFVs.

 

Among the programs cited for the ground forces are Merkava tanks and their development, higher volumes of advanced APCs and IFVs (Namer and Eitan), and the continuation of the howitzer program.

 

This is bad news folks, but I'm optimistic. There is no indication at the moment of any disruption in production for current AFVs.

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Some news folks:

 

According to renewed Elbit Systems' brochures, IMI, now known as Elbit Systems Land, has produced a new 4th gen 105mm APFSDS round under the name M428 (previous generation was M426/DM63).

 

Also, the Merkava 4's gun is not the MG253, but actually the MG251-LR, which stands for Long Recoil.

The MG253 refers only to the gun integrated on the Sabra tank for the Turkish M60T program.

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Seems that now the 188th brigade is transitioning to the Mark 4M tank, which will be completed in late 2020 or early 2021.

Once complete, the entire active arm of the armored corps will be equipped with Merkava 4 tanks with an APS.

 

There does seem to be a conflict of information, however.

 

The report only mentions the Mark 4M tank, not the Barak.

But it was said a while ago that the 188th was selected for the Barak introduction, and that an operational brigade will activate by 2020/2021.

 

EDIT: It appears the Merkava 4 Barak will enter service in 2022 instead, and in the meantime the 188th will be getting regular Mark 4M tanks.

The armored corps will have to select another brigade to receive the Barak.

 

The most likely candidate now is the 401st brigade, as it now operates the oldest tanks in active service.

Edited by Mighty_Zuk
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