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German Rifle Testing In Yuma, Arizona


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Rail is garbage. Who needs a full length six oclock p-rail? You are not going to run lasers down there because of mass clearance. Then you have proprietary interface which means you gotsta buy HKrap to do direct attach. Prail then device is dumber than hell.

And that is pretty much the main 'improvement' over an A5. Like a shitty URGI.

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Are they dragging the rifles on week-long patrols around the Yuma desert and firing off the whole ammo load at least twice? THEN they'll be doing some testing.

No, but they dump them into the dirt, shoot lots of ammunition through them. htere is this photo of testing the H&K MG43 (later named MG4 by BWB) in Yuma from years ago:

 

mg43pile-vi.jpg

 

 

 

They seem to have settled on a long rail/tube/whateve system for the G95k. First photos showed a shorter tube anly reaching the gas block with a fold down sight pinned to the barrel. Or the quad rail cheese grater knwon from other HK416 variants.

Edited by Panzermann
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Pvt Snuffy (and his German kin) can find ways to break gear engineers couldn't come up with on a bad drug trip...

Forget mil-spec--give me Soldier-Proof!

Edited by shep854
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Pvt Snuffy (and his German kin) can find ways to break gear engineers couldn't come up with on a bad drug trip...

Forget mil-spec--give me Soldier-Proof!

 

Give a soldier two rocks. One will be lost the other broken...

 

And the rumors of broken anvils...

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Didn't the German Army have this futuristic rifle that fired, IIRC, "caseless" ammo? Guess it didn't work.

 

Yes the G11 was dropped before really having any introduced into service, when the wall fell. It was still not really mature and they were happy to cut it to save money. a few years later they bought the G36 as a cheap rifle for peacetime conscription army, hence all the corners cut like in the "scope".

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Didn't the German Army have this futuristic rifle that fired, IIRC, "caseless" ammo? Guess it didn't work.

 

Yes the G11 was dropped before really having any introduced into service, when the wall fell. It was still not really mature and they were happy to cut it to save money. a few years later they bought the G36 as a cheap rifle for peacetime conscription army, hence all the corners cut like in the "scope".

 

So was the G11 NOT ready for prime-time, but politically driven and Reunification provided a good excuse to drop a loser? It's interesting that no one has touched it since, despite the theoretical advantages of caseless ammo.

Edited by shep854
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...So was the G11 NOT ready for prime-time, but politically H&K driven and Reunification provided a good excuse to drop a loser?...

 

With a correction I would put a 5$ on it. :)

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Didn't the German Army have this futuristic rifle that fired, IIRC, "caseless" ammo? Guess it didn't work.

 

Yes the G11 was dropped before really having any introduced into service, when the wall fell. It was still not really mature and they were happy to cut it to save money. a few years later they bought the G36 as a cheap rifle for peacetime conscription army, hence all the corners cut like in the "scope".

 

So was the G11 NOT ready for prime-time, but politically driven and Reunification provided a good excuse to drop a loser? It's interesting that no one has touched it since, despite the theoretical advantages of caseless ammo.

 

 

Actually the planed production version did work reasonably well (the one with the 2 spare mags in the weapon), but with re-unification Germany not only had too many G3s for the shrinking army, but also tons of AKs with tons of ammunition. In addition the chances of other NATO partner adopting the G11 were zero due to the end of the cold war. And when the switch to multinational operations outside the actual NATO area started, the G36 offered to use the common 5.56 round and was cheap enough and capable enough for the conscript army of the time.

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Didn't the German Army have this futuristic rifle that fired, IIRC, "caseless" ammo? Guess it didn't work.

 

Yes the G11 was dropped before really having any introduced into service, when the wall fell. It was still not really mature and they were happy to cut it to save money. a few years later they bought the G36 as a cheap rifle for peacetime conscription army, hence all the corners cut like in the "scope".

 

So was the G11 NOT ready for prime-time, but politically driven and Reunification provided a good excuse to drop a loser? It's interesting that no one has touched it since, despite the theoretical advantages of caseless ammo.

 

 

Actually the planed production version did work reasonably well (the one with the 2 spare mags in the weapon), but with re-unification Germany not only had too many G3s for the shrinking army, but also tons of AKs with tons of ammunition. In addition the chances of other NATO partner adopting the G11 were zero due to the end of the cold war. And when the switch to multinational operations outside the actual NATO area started, the G36 offered to use the common 5.56 round and was cheap enough and capable enough for the conscript army of the time.

 

Yet it is a dead-end. Even the latest US tinkering utilizes cased cartridges in various forms.

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Didn't the German Army have this futuristic rifle that fired, IIRC, "caseless" ammo? Guess it didn't work.

 

Yes the G11 was dropped before really having any introduced into service, when the wall fell. It was still not really mature and they were happy to cut it to save money. a few years later they bought the G36 as a cheap rifle for peacetime conscription army, hence all the corners cut like in the "scope".

 

So was the G11 NOT ready for prime-time, but politically driven and Reunification provided a good excuse to drop a loser? It's interesting that no one has touched it since, despite the theoretical advantages of caseless ammo.

 

 

Actually the planed production version did work reasonably well (the one with the 2 spare mags in the weapon), but with re-unification Germany not only had too many G3s for the shrinking army, but also tons of AKs with tons of ammunition. In addition the chances of other NATO partner adopting the G11 were zero due to the end of the cold war. And when the switch to multinational operations outside the actual NATO area started, the G36 offered to use the common 5.56 round and was cheap enough and capable enough for the conscript army of the time.

 

Yet it is a dead-end. Even the latest US tinkering utilizes cased cartridges in various forms.

 

 

Sure, as making the ammo is expensive and handling and storing it is even more so. Add the fact that the heat thrown out of the gun with each case remains in the gun and increases the cooling needs of the gun and the concept makes little sense. But still the final version of the G11 worked reasonably well.

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Point is that they just delayed inevitable, to after 150 rounds.

G3 ammo load might have been 100 rounds, but it would not have problems with cooking off after single ammo load.

G11 would have it after single ammo load.

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