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2019 Obituary


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https://deadline.com/2019/03/dick-dale-dies-surf-guitar-king-and-tv-film-soundtrack-staple-was-81-1202577194/

Dick Dale, whose jangly, reverb-heavy guitar style was the soundtrack on numerous film and TV productions, died on Saturday. No cause was given, but Dale had been in ill health for a number of years, even as he kept up a crowded touring schedule.

 

Dale’s music was a featured attraction in such films as Pulp Fiction, Escape From L.A., Space Jam, Charlie’s Angels: Full Throttle and Garfield 2, among many others. He was equally prolific in TV music, and even had a few acting stints, including an uncredited role in Elvis Presley’s Let’s Make Love in 1960.

 

But it was as a musician that Dale made an indelible mark. His versions of Pipeline and Misirlou (the theme from Pulp Fiction) are considered rock ‘n roll classics, and Dale branded the unique surf sound on several generations of fans. He continued to tour despite a host of health problems, claiming he had to support massive medical bill costs.

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https://deadline.com/2019/03/dick-dale-dies-surf-guitar-king-and-tv-film-soundtrack-staple-was-81-1202577194/

Dick Dale, whose jangly, reverb-heavy guitar style was the soundtrack on numerous film and TV productions, died on Saturday. No cause was given, but Dale had been in ill health for a number of years, even as he kept up a crowded touring schedule.

 

Dales music was a featured attraction in such films as Pulp Fiction, Escape From L.A., Space Jam, Charlies Angels: Full Throttle and Garfield 2, among many others. He was equally prolific in TV music, and even had a few acting stints, including an uncredited role in Elvis Presleys Lets Make Love in 1960.

 

But it was as a musician that Dale made an indelible mark. His versions of Pipeline and Misirlou (the theme from Pulp Fiction) are considered rock n roll classics, and Dale branded the unique surf sound on several generations of fans. He continued to tour despite a host of health problems, claiming he had to support massive medical bill costs.

 

so glad I saw him live in the mid 2000s. RIP and thanks for the music.

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  • 3 weeks later...

Ly Tong, who hijacked planes to fight communism in Vietnam, dies at 73

 

Officially, the Vietnam War ended in April 1975, when North Vietnamese and Viet Cong forces swept through Saigon and gained control of the U.S.-backed South. But for Ly Tong, a former South Vietnamese fighter pilot, the struggle against communism would last for decades more.

As younger generations came of age in a world where Saigon was known as Ho Chi Minh City and the war had receded into the past, Mr. Tong continued his fight, dressing in a military jumpsuit and bomber jacket with his jet-black hair pulled back in a ponytail.

Dubbed “the Vietnamese James Bond,” he drew on his military training to hijack planes, twice dumping tens of thousands of anti-communist pamphlets over Ho Chi Minh City. Urging residents to take up arms against the government, he performed a similar pamphlet drop above Havana, where his rented Cessna was shadowed by Cuban MiGs as he flew back toward South Florida.

Mr. Tong, a self-described “freedom fighter” who made a daring escape from a communist “reeducation” camp, was granted asylum in the United States and later employed nonviolent protest techniques such as hunger strikes, was 73 when he died April 5 at a hospital in San Diego. He was suffering from lung disease and had drawn hundreds of well-wishers in recent weeks, including many South Vietnamese veterans who sought to pay homage to a man who was variously regarded as a terrorist, a revolutionary and a misguided idealist.

“Only people who suffered under Communism will understand what he did, and why he did it,” one of his supporters, Mai Nguyen of San Jose, told the Mercury News in 2012. “We will never forget our history. The younger generation that was born here, they don’t understand. He’s a hero. Nobody else will do what he did.”

Among Vietnamese Americans, Mr. Tong’s reputation largely stemmed from his actions on Sept. 4, 1992, when he boarded an Air Vietnam flight carrying 155 passengers from Bangkok to Ho Chi Minh City. Placing a noose around a flight attendant’s neck and wielding a plastic knife, he soon made his way into the cockpit, according to news accounts and the Aviation Safety Network.

https://www.washingtonpost.com/local/obituaries/ly-tong-who-hijacked-planes-to-fight-communism-in-vietnam-dies-at-73/2019/04/07/17c6c09a-5941-11e9-9625-01d48d50ef75_story.html?utm_term=.ccdf6524b529

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  • 4 weeks later...
  • 2 weeks later...

Mchale's Navy was a bit before I was born. But him basically bring the rest of the cast to tears on "The Carol Burnett" show is how I'll remember him.

 

Edited by GregShaw
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Tim Conway, again teaming up with Ernest Borgnine on a ghostly PT Boat somewhere in the SW Pacific, or Italy.

 

Or he's sketching with Harvey Korman...

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Tim Conway, again teaming up with Ernest Borgnine on a ghostly PT Boat somewhere in the SW Pacific, or Italy.

 

Or he's sketching with Harvey Korman...

 

 

Poor Harvey Korman could barely make it through a sketch without bursting out laughing.

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Tim Conway, again teaming up with Ernest Borgnine on a ghostly PT Boat somewhere in the SW Pacific, or Italy.

 

Or he's sketching with Harvey Korman...

 

 

Poor Harvey Korman could barely make it through a sketch without bursting out laughing.

 

 

Hell ALL of us could barely keep it under control...

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https://www.msn.com/en-gb/news/uknews/judith-kerr-beloved-author-of-the-tiger-who-came-to-tea-dies-aged-95/ar-AABNbjm?OCID=ansmsnnews11

 

Judith Kerr, the author and illustrator whose debut picture book The Tiger Who Came to Tea introduced generations of pre-school children to the joyful chaos of uncontrolled appetites, has died at the age of 95 .

Kerr, who dreamed up the tiger to amuse her two children, only started publishing in her 40s, and lived to see the Tiger reach its millionth sale as she turned 94. To her mild chagrin, it remained her best loved single book: “I’ve got better at drawing, obviously,” she told one interviewer.

Over a 50-year career she published more than 30 further books, immortalising a succession of family cats through the naughty but lovable Mog, and bringing to life her family’s flight across Europe as the Nazis came to power in the novel When Hitler Stole Pink Rabbit.

Last week, she was named illustrator of the year at the British Book Awards, although she didn’t attend the ceremony. A new book, The Curse of the School Rabbit, described as a “laugh-out story of a boy, a rabbit, and a lot of bad luck”, will be published in June; Kerr told the Observer in an interview last week, that her greatest fear was “not being able to work”.

Kerr was born in 1923 into the intelligentsia of interwar Berlin, where her father Alfred was a leading theatre critic and newspaper columnist and her mother Julia was a talented composer. As a Jew and an outspoken critic of the rising Nazi party, Alfred Kerr was a marked man, whose notoriety forced the family to leave Germany in 1933, fleeing first to Switzerland and then France, before settling in England three years later.

This journey was at the centre of When Hitler Stole Pink Rabbit, which was published in 1971, the first in a trilogy of semi-autobiographical novels. In Pink Rabbit, her alter ego Anna muses on the cost to children of having famous parents and watches her mother struggle with knitting and scrambling eggs after being deprived of a maid for the first time in her previously cosseted life. The second volume, released four years later, describes their narrow escape when the down-at-heel Bloomsbury hotel in which they are staying is bombed.

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https://www.foxnews.com/sports/bart-starr-1960s-green-bay-quarterback-dies-at-85

Bart Starr, legendary 1960's Green Bay Packers quarterback, dies at 85

 

Met Bart Starr at the Atlantic City Airport back in the 70s. My dad recognized him and spoke to him. He came over and spoke to my brother and I and sent us signed photographs (they did that kind of thing for free back then). He was a very kind gentleman.

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