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Russian Uran-9 Robot Tank Fail In Syria


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"Russia's Uran-9 robot tank reportedly performed horribly in Syria

 

Daniel Brown 09 Jul 2018 8:40 PM 215

 

A Uran-9 unmanned ground vehicle presented by Rosoboronexport, Russia's state intermediary agency for it's defense industry

Rosoboronexport

Russia's new Uran-9 robot tank apparently had a terrible debut in Syria.

The unmanned tank couldn't operate as far away from its controllers as expected, had problems firing its 30mm gun, and couldn't fire while moving.

The robot tank also could only acquire targets up to about 1.24 miles away, as opposed to four miles as was expected.

Russia's new Uran-9 robot tank apparently had a terrible debut in Syria.

 

The unmanned tank couldn't operate as far away from its controllers as expected, had problems firing its 30mm gun, and couldn't fire while moving, amid other problems, according to Popular Mechanics, citing the Defence Blog.

 

Unveiled in September 2016 and deployed to Syria in May, the Uran-9 is an unmanned tank that was supposed to be capable of operating up to 1.8 miles away from its controller.

 

But in Syria, it could only be operated from about 984 to 1,640 feet from its operators around high-rise buildings, the Defence Blog reported, citing reports from the 10th all-Russian scientific conference "Actual problems of protection and security" in St. Petersburg.

 

The robot tank's controller also randomly lost control of it 17 times for up to one minute and two times for up to an hour and a half, Defence Blog reported.

 

Uran-9

 

A Russian Uran-9 unmanned armoured reconnaissance and infantry support vehicle is seen during the Victory Day Parade in 2018.

Associated Press

The Uran-9 is heavily armed with four 9M120-1 Ataka anti-tank guided missile launchers, six 93 millimeter-caliber rocket-propelled Shmel-M reactive flamethrowers, one 30-millimeter 2A72 automatic cannon, and one 7.62-millimeter coaxial machine gun.

 

But its 30-millimeter 2A72 automatic cannon delayed six times and even failed once, Defence Blog reported, and it could only acquire targets up to about 1.24 miles away, as opposed to the expected four miles.

 

Apparently the tank's optical station was seeing "multiple interferences on the ground and in the airspace in the surveillance sector," Defence Blog reported.

 

The unmanned tank even had issues with its chassis and suspension system, and required repairs in the field, Defence Blog reported.

 

"The Uran-9 seems to have proven to be more about novelty than capability, but that doesn't mean these tests are without value," SOFREP reported. "In time (and with funding) a successor to the Uran-9 may one day be a battlefield force to be reckoned with."

 

...and the Goliath wants to know what's new about remote controlled tanks not working. :) But look at the bright side. Every Russian military museum might get an Uran-9! ;)

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Seems like two problems. Unreliable (high bandwidth) datalink, and a 30mm cannon that requires a crew.

 

If the datalink fails due to buildings, in a peer battlefield it will never work, due to jamming. If this report is accurate, it's a toy until that's fixed.

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No, it wont work on a peer battlefield, but it might have a utility in asymmetric conflicts or even peacekeeping. Although a 30mm probably is not THE ideal weapon for peacekeeping...

 

Its worth remembering we are looking at high altitude drones to act as signal relays as well. Im not sure whether they envisage it for peer v peer conflict though.

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At least they're fielding something and exposing the design kinks, which means engineers can come up with fixes. Lather, rinse, repeat, and eventually they'll have something worth using.

 

They're ahead of America in that game -- we don't have any "robot tanks" being fielded at all (unless you count TALON/SWORDS, which isn't in the same class in the slightest). BAE's Black Knight is comparable, but isn't being fielded, so any non-obvious flaws in its design will remain unknown.

 

In the long term, I expect the radio datalink problem will be solved by increasing the robot's capacity for autonomy. This would allow control despite intermittent connectivity -- when the radio link was up, high-level commands or mission plans would be sent to the robot, and when the link was down, the robot would follow the plan to the best of its ability.

 

It may be a while before that degree of autonomy is possible, but that's okay, they have time to work on it while these other problems get exposed and fixed.

Edited by TTK Ciar
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At least they're fielding something and exposing the design kinks, which means engineers can come up with fixes. Lather, rinse, repeat, and eventually they'll have something worth using.

 

They're ahead of America in that game -- we don't have any "robot tanks" being fielded at all (unless you count TALON/SWORDS, which isn't in the same class in the slightest). BAE's Black Knight is comparable, but isn't being fielded, so any non-obvious flaws in its design will remain unknown.

There simply appears to be zero interest from the Pentagon along these lines. My brother was working on development of similar systems (though much smaller and far less capable than what this platform was trying to achieve) and after several years (and even promising achievements according to him) he said the writing was on the wall and he jumped ship back to work in the civilian sector.

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...and the Goliath wants to know what's new about remote controlled tanks not working. :) But look at the bright side. Every Russian military museum might get an Uran-9! ;)

Heck,they could even produce a few for export so that other country's museums could have one too.

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Company(766 UPTK) that "create" this toy known for pretending to be "creators" of uran-6 and uran-14, which is croatian DOK-ING company robots MV-4 and MVF-5, at the moment our MoD doesn't interested in how something work(if it's work) , or who create it, they just wasting money on all kind of stuff

 

+ if you have that idiotic "approved by actual combat in Syria" label, you can do and sell anything you want

Edited by Wiedzmin
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They must have a backer in MoD. I would have thought a robotized BMD to be easier.

No need for BMD (expensive and relatively weak chassis built from light alloy). Robotized BMP-3 was tested with universal armament module developed in Sevastopol

https://topwar.ru/107242-robototehnicheskiy-kompleks-vihr.html

 

Robotized T-72 https://andrei-bt.livejournal.com/949786.html

bmpt2.jpg

72ba72d8c8ca.png

1bmpt.jpg

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