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But of course the Focke-Wulf pilot's name is Kurt.

 

Interesting tail insignia on it, essentially consisting of the swastika minus all of its interior lines, but recognizable as such.

 

If a new such party were ever to rise, that postmodernist symbol would stand a good chance of being adopted by it.

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This is what they do on the IL2 sim. I dont like the modified swastika. I don't like a full one either, but arguably it either ought to be present entirely, or not painted at all. If I owned one, id stick a modern German flag on it in preference to that.

 

 

Amusingly the FW190 is on the Spitfires tail. Well it was filmed in Germany. :D

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The Fw has always struck me as the epitomy of beautiful-deadly. The Bf is ugly-deadly. Leather-covered helmets was a nice touch in the videos.

 

Ive always been a Butcher bird fan as well.

 

 

Saw Fifi today, doing flyovers all afternoon.

 

I envy you.

Speaking of Texas Boeings, I noticed this the other day.

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Not sure if the Beaufighter’s armament differed between variants, but it had a heavy strafing punch from what I have read of it. There might be an ammunition hazard at that site.

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Probably fuel contamination im thinking.

 

The Aussies are working hard to return a Canberra to the skies. Having seen what was possibly the last flight of one in UK skies, im deeply thrilled one might be returning to the air.

http://warbirdsnews.com/warbird-restorations/english-electric-canberra-tt-18-wj680-first-engine-start-at-temora.html

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I wish we were able to still do things like that in the UK. Unfortunately in the 1980's there was a lot of unscrupulous relic hunters who went and dug up aircraft still with the crews in them disturbing their remains, and the Government came down particularly heavy handed on it. Its rare for the MOD to allow digs on aircraft unless its proven the crew successfully evacuated. The downside is, aircraft where the crew may still be present and should be recovered, never are.

 

There was an interesting article (not long) about a Il2 that was recovered out of a Norwegian lake in the 1980's, and restored and returned to a Norwegian air museum. They seemingly did a very nice job on it.

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I wish we were able to still do things like that in the UK. Unfortunately in the 1980's there was a lot of unscrupulous relic hunters who went and dug up aircraft still with the crews in them disturbing their remains, and the Government came down particularly heavy handed on it. Its rare for the MOD to allow digs on aircraft unless its proven the crew successfully evacuated. The downside is, aircraft where the crew may still be present and should be recovered, never are.

The same here in Russia (unfortunately strict regulations are mostly ignored by “diggers” -and there is no way to support with police force out in forests and fields). But our case is different – as I am now Head of museum exhibits search department, Patriot Park – we are Russian MOD and can do things officially.

 

 

 

There was an interesting article (not long) about a Il2 that was recovered out of a Norwegian lake in the 1980's, and restored and returned to a Norwegian air museum. They seemingly did a very nice job on it.

 

With English subtitles

Edited by Roman Alymov
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There is a very good book by after the battle called 'Wreck Recovery in Britain', that shows how it happens. In fact there was at least one recovery by a group of a Spitfire pilot at the request of the family, that the MOD had refused permission to go ahead. Their view was it was worth getting prosecuted to go and get him back. Im not sure they actually were as it happens. There are of course instances where they believe the crewmen have been recovered, and found that the recovery team during the war was not always that efficient, which causes a certain amount of awkwardness in paperwork.

 

This is an interesting story, the remains of a early recce spitfire as flown by one of those who died in the Great Escape is going to be restored to flight. Its effectively going to be a new aircraft, but if you can incorporate components from the original you can lay a claim to its identity, which makes the resulting aircraft far more valuable than a straight replica. A straight replica is as good as an original aircraft, but its never going to be worth what you put into building it.

 

https://www.independent.co.uk/news/world/europe/spitfire-norway-mountain-great-escape-pilot-found-second-world-war-nazi-raf-espionage-alastair-gunn-a8646841.html

Edited by Stuart Galbraith
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