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More Chieftain's Hatchiness


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'Regulator' really is the industry term for the mechanism that raises and lowers the door window glass. Google 'window regulator'; you'll get an eyeful. :P

Edited by shep854
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We had three quads when I first joined. Good little trucks. The battery under the passenger seat was a bit of a hazard during a roll over due to leaking battery fluid. Some units removed the top of the cab to turn it into a big jeep. We replaced them with a militarized variant of the Chevy K series trucks. The 1976 Pattern 1 1/4 Ton SMP turned out to be fairly good.

 

[rivet counting] The rear lights are not the original pattern. It was very similar, but had a much smaller red light. The newer pattern light may be to conform with current regulations to make it street legal. [/rivet counting]

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remember the vacuum operated wipers?

Yes I do. I also remember seeing the road pass by under my feet as the floor on one of our '53 pattern Jeeps was rusted out. We were happy to get the hand-me-down '70 pattern M38A1 a couple of years later.
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We had three quads when I first joined. Good little trucks. The battery under the passenger seat was a bit of a hazard during a roll over due to leaking battery fluid. Some units removed the top of the cab to turn it into a big jeep. We replaced them with a militarized variant of the Chevy K series trucks. The 1976 Pattern 1 1/4 Ton SMP turned out to be fairly good.

 

[rivet counting] The rear lights are not the original pattern. It was very similar, but had a much smaller red light. The newer pattern light may be to conform with current regulations to make it street legal. [/rivet counting]

Don't know what the M37 had, but those tail lights were are the same as mounted on the M35 2 1/2t and M813 5t vehicles.

id_m813a1_04_700.jpg

 

Edit to add. Looks like the original tail light assembly was the same as used by the M38 and M151 jeeps.

208020_Rear_3-4_Web.jpg

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See that 3/4-ton, and speaking of watching the road through the bottom, in the late 60s, I was "privileged" to drive a 3/4-ton truck which had been prepared for air dropping. These babys were not palletized, they were simply dragged out the back of the plane by a small parachute. Hopefully with the handbrake on. And landing — again, hopefully— intact and right-side-up. Anyway, besides being pretty well stripped down, holes had been cut over the shock absorbers. What with the lack of tarps, windshield, and doors (also removed for airdropping), it was a very unpleasant vehicle to drive. Heater? We're talking late 1960s here. Most jeeps and 3/4-ton vehicles did not have heaters. At least not in Europe. :blink:

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remember the vacuum operated wipers?

Back in the late 60s, I drove a Ford Falcon with vacuum wipers. Going up a grade in the rain was interesting. Edited by shep854
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We need to get The Chieftain into a Type 95 Ha-Go, preferably one that has both the gun and the turret machinegun intact and in place. :D

I wouldn't mind a review of the Tiger II.

 

Not a video, but more detailed, I did a crawl-through of the Saumur Tiger II in 2015 and described it with attention to crew positions and 23 color plates, including views taken through the driver and commander periscopes:

51KG5IBCZvL._SX345_BO1,204,203,200_.jpg​

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What are/we're vacuum wipers?

 

Ha! you're not so old after all. These wipers were operated using engine vacuum taken from the manifold to power the pivot arm, switching direction at each sweep using alternating valves. They disappeared by the early 70s.

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What are/we're vacuum wipers?

Ha! you're not so old after all. These wipers were operated using engine vacuum taken from the manifold to power the pivot arm, switching direction at each sweep using alternating valves. They disappeared by the early 70s.

And as engine RPM decreased, so did the vacuum, and hence the wiper speed. On a step grade, they would stop altogether. No fun in the rain.
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Wartime lube probably wasnt the highest quality either; just good enough. Also, those engines (and the tanks themselves) werent expected to last very long.

Edited by shep854
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Also the oil filters...wait..

 

Manic, are you sure the pointer on the lube chart wasn't specifying the change of the oil in the air filter oil bath? Because I think that IS every 500 miles for Vandal. That's like 1/8th a quart on our vehicle. Probably more on a tank but not more than a quart.

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