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Bulgaria at the time used same green (and basically the same uniform) as Russia.

My guess is that we used French like blue with kepi about 1878, then moved to a more modern uniform in the end of 19th century. WW1 Serbian like green, but make it a bit more green to differentiate. That is serviceable and has OK camo factor. As for design... almost all period designs were roughly the same. Only question is will you use full boots or shoes with leg wraps.

1acb6766a3883a0f1ffd27a4af2ae665.png

Post-war... More less same color, just modernize uniform and LBE.

 

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I do understand the benefits of our military exports, and the navy has more legitimate interest in a light automatic carbine than any other service. Yet one feels it necessary to point out there's a rather large war going on, somewhat closer to home than the United States.

Yes they are a rich country and one day might be a powerful one and have some influence. But right now your fools in the Ordnance Bureau will not release my 7cm guns to arm the auxiliary ships we are taking into service. Nor will they issue any more Naval Pattern carbines from store. My spies tell me they have begun converting those in store to Jager Patten and just this morning I hear they are trying to withdraw those carbines we have and replace with them crusty old long rifles, some babble about second line weapons for second line service! Although why we need three patterns of carbine in the first place is a mystery to me. If the border scouts don't want a bayonet that's no reason to lop the lug off, and my heart bleeds for the infantry and artillery types who can't make loud crunching noises on the parade ground with a naval type rubber butt pad installed. In any case that those sty sniffers in Ordnance are still converting things the wrong way around, Artillery Carbine to Jager Carbine is 2 minutes with a hacksaw and file to take the bayonet lug off, Naval to Jager needs a 12mm spacer added to the butt.

But carbines are a minor issue, I need those 7cm guns. I agree they are ideal for both the roles I'm told Ordnance has reserved them for, as direct fire weapons for this proposed line of national fortification I'm sure they would be wonderful shoved into a bunker overlooking some road up in the hills. Likewise if provided with new high angle mounts they would certainly boost our national AA capability, although of marginal utility unless they are also provided with fire control apparatus. But no one is invading or bombing us yet, and I have ships I'm sending to sea under our naval ensign armed with an old Lewis gun and two flare pistols.  Any deterrent value these other roles may have seems a little moot in light of this embarrassment. 

It's not that we in the Navy are oblivious to changes in circumstance, policy and requirements, it is just a little galling to send men running about in tunnels and ships with half-pikes that were obsolete when issued to their grandfathers before the last war. While everyone is fawning over the Amies pie in the sky toys, that they'd probably just steal even if we won the competition. A I swear there was no arguing with the logic of a combined procurement and supply organisation back during the depression, but... well I can only hope it has served the Army better than us.

<just to add a little spice to the narrative :D > 

Edited by Argus
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We don't braze bayonet lugs to barrels. They are all mounted to handguard caps or clamped to the barrels. Those Navy pattern carbines were still in grease paper wrapping, never having been issued, perhaps indicative of the priorities of the service, which is the envy of the Black Sea, with those Thornycroft escorts and German motor torpedo boats. 

As far as the 7cm BAK, you can probably get them back, since we are trying to buy ex-Czech fortress armament. 

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On 11/22/2020 at 9:04 AM, bojan said:

Bulgaria at the time used same green (and basically the same uniform) as Russia.

My guess is that we used French like blue with kepi about 1878, then moved to a more modern uniform in the end of 19th century. WW1 Serbian like green, but make it a bit more green to differentiate. That is serviceable and has OK camo factor. As for design... almost all period designs were roughly the same. Only question is will you use full boots or shoes with leg wraps.

1acb6766a3883a0f1ffd27a4af2ae665.png

Post-war... More less same color, just modernize uniform and LBE.

 

The history behind the rectangle shaped hat on the soldier to the left?

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The War is very quiet so far. Neither the Entente or the Germans are going at each other on the fronts, though all sides are furiously expanding their militaries.

The first Tankovian Falke should be flying before Christmas with the Hispano 12Y engines and FN-Browning 13.2s. 

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We have all seen the movie where the hero rides into a town that is quite, too quite! That is the reason why everybody is arming themselves like crazy. They are worried about the two attacking each other indirectly and no one wants a piece of that.

 

And now for some interesting developments in anti tank weapons:

Some of Poland‘s Wz. 35 anti-tank rifles have fallen into Hungarian hands who let us examine them. At first glance it looks like just another ATR: 8mm, bolt action, magazine but it is something entirely different. The round is not intended to penetrate the armor. Upon impact it flattens and transfers its energy to the front of the plate. That results in fragments of 20mm(!) in diameter being forcefully ejected from the other side of the plate.

This is even more interesting than we initially thought. Of course we no longer need light weight bullets with special steel penetrators to improve performance and a hit with a 13mm bullet will cause even more bigger spalling on the inside. The truly game changing factor is physics. It is not kinetic energy applied to the front of a plate that causes the spalling at the rear, it is force in the from of kinetic energy. Meaning you can get the same result by applying the force in a different way. Tests with steel and concrete confirmed it. If you detonate explosive on one side you get spalling on the other side.

This is looking like a technically simpler yet equally effective alternative to the use of ‘shaped charges’. Speaking of, the experiments with flatter shooting AT rifle grenades are getting results.

Observe the test of a dummy grenade launched from a standard grenade discharger:

 

 

 

With a 13mm blank we should do even better and someone got the idea to fill the long tail of the grenade with propellant and thus create a rifle rocket-grenade.

 

 

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The performance of this or that ATR ammo type in the nearer future isn't the key point as ATR in general become obsolescent. Giving people the idea for HESH is. 

BTW, it is recommended that this idea is very discreetly shared with France and Great Britain but not Germany. 

Edited by Markus Becker
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We are getting hung up with wanting to do everything with one cartridge etc. To propel a heavier mass, what you really want is more gas at lower pressure. Like in a shotgun. If we absolutely have to use the same cartridge, then it needs to have an expansion chamber. 

Look what I found

US9448033B2 - Projectile launcher with a permanent high-low pressure system - Google Patents

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