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It seems like burning diesel floating on the water near the shaft, but I've no idea what could cause such an incident. AFAIK diesel and diesel engines wouldn't be anywhere near the very aft of the boat. It likely did minimal damage to the screw, but the Russian explanation is never the less laughable.

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As far as I know only two were ever made like that, one test platform that has been laid up in the Black Sea many years ago and I think a new one based in Murmansk that was a test bed for one of the newer nuke boat's screws (Yasen? Borei?).

 

Its possible but seems unlikely. Does the propulsor have moving parts outside the standard rudder? Are the vanes inside the shroud moveable?

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Since this “parking” is in full view of entire city, and there are no reports\rumors about damage etc after two days – quite likely it was really training fire, may be training fire that got wrong (as it is reported as put down in 6 minutes or even three minutes by other sources, seems like firefighters and personnel were standing ready, so there was prior knowledge). Anyway, information will surface.

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Well it comes in 3s. The Argentinian, the Indian and now a Russian submarine. Hope is the last incidentes :(

Submarines are nightmare for safety precautions planner, combining fuel (or even nuclear materials), highly pressurized oxygen and air, pressurized oil and hydraulic equipment, complicated electric equipment, range of chemical materials, explosives, and personnel operating all this in very narrow space – sometimes deep under water and at high speed. Not surprising incidents happen from time to time.

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That type of escape equipment was replaced on British subs in the late 60s by a suit with an integral clear airtight hood and no rebreather system

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That type of escape equipment was replaced on British subs in the late 60s by a suit with an integral clear airtight hood and no rebreather system

The idea of this equipment is not only "escape equipment" but also allowing crewmembers to breathe inside the boat for some time fighting fire\flooding. But down side of that is more complex design and potential dangers associated with pressurised oxygen tanks. No solution is perfect.

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That type of escape equipment was replaced on British subs in the late 60s by a suit with an integral clear airtight hood and no rebreather system

The idea of this equipment is not only "escape equipment" but also allowing crewmembers to breathe inside the boat for some time fighting fire\flooding. But down side of that is more complex design and potential dangers associated with pressurised oxygen tanks. No solution is perfect.

 

 

Our sub crews have separate equipment for that. Obviously it would mean changing from the one to the other to escape which is not great, but as you point out, no solution is perfect.

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