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Water Dragons Of The Middle Kingdom


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This probably belongs on a PLARF thread.

https://www.thedrive.com/the-war-zone/30058/lets-talk-about-this-previously-unseen-ground-launched-missile-that-china-just-leaked

China appears to have accidentally revealed the existence of a new high-speed ground-launched missile. A brief glimpse of what looks to be a test launch of this previously unseen weapon emerged earlier this week in an official video released in the run-up to the 70th anniversary of the founding of the Communist State on Oct. 1. There have already been indications that a number of new or otherwise previously unseen aircraft, missiles, and other systems will be present at a major parade in Beijing to mark the occasion next week.

The People's Liberation Army Rocket Force, or PLARF, posted the full video on social media on Sept. 25, 2019. Sometime afterward, the original one-minute long montage was replaced with one that omitted the launch of the unknown weapon and replaced it with unrelated footage of known missiles, according to the South China Morning Post.

The PLARF is in charge of China's strategic nuclear arsenal, as well as a variety of conventionally-armed long-range ground-based ballistic and cruise missiles. The service is also in charge of ballistic missile defense, which may then also include anti-satellite capabilities. The PLARF came into being in 2015 with the decision to elevate what was previously known as the 2nd Artillery Force into a full service with equal status to the People's Liberation Army's Army, Air Force, and Navy.

There is no obvious indication about what this new missile is or what its mission may be. The video shows that it is vertically launched from a 10-wheel transporter-erector-launcher (TEL) that appears to be able to carry two of the weapons in a ready-to-fire configuration. Photos of preparations for the 70th-anniversary parade in Beijing on Oct. 1, 2019, have shown a similar, previously unseen TEL with its entire rear section tarped off.

 

To my mind, it looks very reminicent of Pershing 2. So you wonder if its made with Taiwan and maybe even Japan in mind.

Edited by Stuart Galbraith
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They dont know. From the article they speculate its got a Ramjet engine, which implies long range high speed cruise. But it cant be ruled out dual use Land/sea attack.

 

'The main weapon has large strakes or fins and what appear to be a number of relatively long and thin fairings at the tail end, which some have suggested could be ramjet intakes. An air-breathing ramjet propulsion system would fit with the large booster motor, since the weapon would then need to get up to an appropriate speed and altitude before its engines could function properly. A number of existing Chinese supersonic anti-ship missiles, such as the YJ-12 series or the newer HD-1, use a similar general configuration.

The PLARF already operates the ground-based subsonic CJ-10 land-attack cruise missile, which has a range of approximately 930 miles. This has led some to believe that this new weapon is a supersonic, or possibly hypersonic, land-attack cruise missile intended to replace that existing weapon. Hypersonic speed is defined as greater than Mach 5. The wide nose and missile body, together with the strakes/fins, would seem to make it unlikely that this is indeed a hypersonic weapon.

Others have posited that it could be a new quasi-ballistic missile. However, the strakes/fins and possible ramjet propulsion would be at odds with what one would expect to see in a weapon that is supposed to fly in a ballistic flight path.

Regardless of the exact nature of its configuration, the weapon could also potentially be intended for other roles instead of or in addition to striking land targets, including engaging hostile ships at extended ranges. The PLARF has already developed significant anti-ship ballistic missile capabilities, most notably with the DF-21D medium-range ballistic missile and the DF-26 intermediate-range ballistic missile, the latter of which is seen in the video below.'

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There is some rumors they have a plan for a ballistic missile carrying ship, carrying DF-21/26. That would probably be a big ship if it ever gets made.

That seems exceedingly impractical. Probably sino fanboi bullshit like the H-6K mounted DF-21.

 

Seems like it (aero-ballistic missile on H-K6) was not totally fanboi bullshit after all (not trying to make a snide point here).

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Indeed, I stand corrected. It may not be DF-21, but the attachment points and shaping of the fuselage clearly indicate a large missile or weapon pod hard point. I assume we'll get a first look during the 70th celebrations. Presumably this would be for very long ranged, high priority static targets since I can't see how they would generate targeting data outside DF-26 range.

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The 'new radar' is the Type 518 L-band.

 

I don't recall seeing that kind of looking radar on warships of other nations. Looks like an old fashion antenna that could easily be used by other naval powers. What advantage would its L-band have over other radars and why don't other warships feature it?

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The 'new radar' is the Type 518 L-band.

 

I don't recall seeing that kind of looking radar on warships of other nations. Looks like an old fashion antenna that could easily be used by other naval powers. What advantage would its L-band have over other radars and why don't other warships feature it?

 

It is replacing the Type 517 VHF (~1 metre wavelength) air search radar which is a long range search radar with some anti-stealth capability, but limited resolution.

 

Type 518 probably operates into the very low end of L band, near UHF - i.e around 30 cm wavelength. Target resolution, will consequently be somewhat better, whilst some anti-stealth capability is retained.

 

L band is also much better than VHF for picking up low flying targets. This was one reason for the UK going from VHF(type 965) to L band (Type 1022) search radars.

 

See also the US AN/SPS-49 (a large L band air search radar).

Edited by KV7
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SPS-49 has had some controversy. there was a decision to replace it, but a replacement was not available, so the sets are just being removed.

'The AN/SPY-1 Aegis radar system is the most powerful of the CG-47 sensors. This system is the Nation's most advanced shipboard air search sensor providing location and targeting information to destroy airborne threats. However, the CG-47 had another air search radar system known as the SPS-49. The SPS-49 radar has some shortcomings and is not an adequate backup for the AEGIS SPY-l radar. Therefore, retaining the SPS-49 radar system seemed highly questionable to some. The Navy installed SPS-49 radar systems on the CG-47 class against the wishes of the House Appropriations Committee and contrary to a recommendation of the GAO. The CG-47' Project office officials and program sponsors disagreed, however, and contended that the SPS-49 provides a useful function and enhances operational flexibility. However, the long-range surveillance function can be performed by the Aegis radar system in a superior manner.'

https://www.globalsecurity.org/military/systems/ship/systems/an-sps-49.htm

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