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Feminist scientists say citing research by straight, white men promotes ‘a system of oppression’

 

Academics and scholars must be mindful about using research done by only straight, white men, according to two scientists who argued that it oppresses diverse voices and bolsters the status of already privileged and established white male scholars.
Geographers Carrie Mott and Daniel Cockayne argued in a recent paper that doing so also perpetuates what they call “white heteromasculinism,” which they defined as a “system of oppression” that benefits only those who are “white, male, able-bodied, economically privileged, heterosexual, and cisgendered.” (Cisgendered describes people whose gender identity matches their birth sex.)
Mott, a professor at Rutgers University in New Jersey, and Cockayne, who teaches at the University of Waterloo in Ontario, argued that scholars or researchers disproportionately cite the work of white men, thereby unfairly adding credence to the body of knowledge they offer while ignoring the voices of other groups, like women and black male academics. Although citation seems like a mundane practice, the feminist professors argue that citing someone's work has implications on his or her ability to be hired, get promoted and obtain tenured status, among others.
[Women’s issues are different from trans women’s issues, feminist author says, sparking criticism]
“This important research has drawn direct attention to the continued underrepresentation and marginalization of women, people of color. … To cite narrowly, to only cite white men … or to only cite established scholars, does a disservice not only to researchers and writers who are othered by white heteromasculinism …," they wrote in the paper published recently in the journal Gender, Place and Culture.
Mott and Cockayne did not immediately respond to questions from The Washington Post, but Mott told Campus Reform last week that they decided to write about citation practices after observing that research done by white men are relied upon more heavily than those done by experts from other backgrounds.
Excited to share the @GPCjournal paper that @mott_carrie and I wrote, "Citation matters." Check it out here! https://t.co/zSQHM2FciN
— Daniel Cockayne (@insistondoubt) June 13, 2017
Work done by women and other minorities have often been overlooked by their peers, hindering their professional advancement and depriving disciplines of diverse perspectives, she argued.
When citations are predominantly those of the work of white, straight males, “this means that the views and knowledge that are represented do not reflect the experience of people from other backgrounds,” she told Campus Reform. “When scholars continue to cite only white men on a given topic, they ignore the broader diversity of voices and researchers that are also doing important work on that topic.”
In their 22-page paper, “Citation matters: mobilizing the politics of citation toward a practice of 'conscientious engagement,'" they explained that their work was motivated by “shared feelings of discomfort, frustration, and anger” over actions of fellow scholars and publication practices.
The authors offer what they describe as practical strategies for fellow geographers who work in a largely male-dominated discipline. According to the American Association of Geographers, men and women account for 62 percent and 38 percent of its members, respectively.
[Feminist group alleges sexually hostile environment at U of Mary Washington]
One of them: Scholars should read through their work and count all the citations before submitting their work for publication, and see how many people of diverse backgrounds — women, people of color, early-career scholars, graduate students and non-academics — are cited.
“Today, the field is more diverse, but this diversity is largely represented by earlier career scholars. Citing only tenured, established scholars means that these voices are ignored, especially when it is well-known that today's brutally competitive academic job market continues to privilege the white heteromasculinist body,” they wrote.
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Editors and reviewers also can act as watchdogs of sort by scrutinizing a scholar's body of citation, they argued.
Campus Reform writer said she asked the researchers whether the disparity in citations is simply because there are more men than women in the field of geography. In response, Cockayne said their point is that research done by “marginalized voices” is often ignored.
Rutgers and Cockayne both describe themselves as feminists and have done research related to feminism.
Rutgers also focuses her research on race and social justice, among other things. She describes herself as a “feminist political geographer,” who's interested in “how resistance movements mobilize to fight against state-sponsored violence and marginalization.” Cockayne's research and interest are on digital media, entrepreneurship, and gender and sexuality.

 

 

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Can I claim they are appropriating my culture by using computers? That is a clear and distinct product of my culture, and I am offended by their using it in this way.

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I'd like to see this circle back on them. Citation?, we don't got no citation, we don't need no stink'n citation. That is a straight white maie oppressor thing. We just make things up.

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I'd like to see this circle back on them. Citation?, we don't got no citation, we don't need no stink'n citation. That is a straight white maie oppressor thing. We just make things up.

 

This they already do. Make things up and always are men to blame. Has in the history of fminism a woman been responsible for herself ever? Sometimes it looks like any random man in reach is blamed.

 

Their messianic prophetic figures like Judith Butler are cited over and over again of course. If relevant to the topic or not. Because lots of citations are science. Or rather the cargo cult mitation of such. Oh and they love conventions. Who said it is just klatch back there?

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I'd like to see this circle back on them. Citation?, we don't got no citation, we don't need no stink'n citation. That is a straight white maie oppressor thing. We just make things up.

 

This they already do. Make things up and always are men to blame. Has in the history of fminism a woman been responsible for herself ever? Sometimes it looks like any random man in reach is blamed.

 

Their messianic prophetic figures like Judith Butler are cited over and over again of course. If relevant to the topic or not. Because lots of citations are science. Or rather the cargo cult mitation of such. Oh and they love conventions. Who said it is just klatch back there?

 

 

These people mostly mellow out as soon as they leave academia and have to look for real jobs. Most of them wind up in some media consultant field or something like that. Not much time for feminist Twitter wars after that. :D

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After I forced myself to read through half of the paper I can't help but feel really sorry for them. Poor gals!

 

Btw, what exaclty is "feminist geography" supposed to be? Obviously not that kind of geography I thought (and appreciate) it'd be?! She-hills? She-rivers? She-continents? She-Ra?

 

EDIT: Nevermind, I've found the wiki article (which seems to be written by a f.g. authoress, clapping herself on her shoulder). Ok, ok, I got it now!

 

Is there something as feminist physics as well? Checking ... nope, not yet.

 

Must ... resist ... not to .... start ... article ...

 

 

Holy sh*t I'm too late! And I will readily admit that I bow to the professional bovine faecism displayed there.

Edited by APF
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I'd like to see this circle back on them. Citation?, we don't got no citation, we don't need no stink'n citation. That is a straight white maie oppressor thing. We just make things up.

 

This they already do. Make things up and always are men to blame. Has in the history of fminism a woman been responsible for herself ever? Sometimes it looks like any random man in reach is blamed.

 

Their messianic prophetic figures like Judith Butler are cited over and over again of course. If relevant to the topic or not. Because lots of citations are science. Or rather the cargo cult mitation of such. Oh and they love conventions. Who said it is just klatch back there?

 

Margaret Mead was a famous anthropologist who studied the natives in one south sea island during the 1920 or 1930s. Her book pointed out that matriarchal societies work and natives are socialists. She became quite famous. Years later another scientist (a male) went back to this island and interviewed the natives which interacted with her. They said they told her a bunch of silly stuff and basically put her on. Everyone was in on the joke, but her.

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Relevant:

https://science.slashdot.org/story/17/07/16/2336209/crypto-bashing-prime-minister-argues-the-laws-of-mathematics-dont-apply-in-australia

 

Crypto-Bashing Prime Minister Argues The Laws Of Mathematics Don't Apply In Australia

Australian Prime Minister Malcolm Turnbull has said the laws of mathematics come second to the law of the land in a row over privacy and encryption... When challenged by a technology journalist over whether it was possible to tackle the problem of criminals using encryption -- given that platform providers claim they are currently unable to break into the messages even if required to do so by law -- the Prime Minister raised eyebrows as he made his reply. "Well the laws of Australia prevail in Australia, I can assure you of that. The laws of mathematics are very commendable, but the only law that applies in Australia is the law of Australia," he said... "The important thing is to recognise the challenge and call on the companies for assistance. I am sure they know morally they should... They have to face up to their responsibility."
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I say they should test their beliefs are right by climbing to the top of one of these male orentated geographical features like the Grand Canyon and throw the self off because that white overprivalged male scientist called Newton theories must be wrong.

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Mobius, you are thinking of Margaret Mead.

 

--

Soren

Thanks, I finally remembered her first name and Googled helped with the rest.

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Wait until we get feminist engineering and stuff starts falling down because why follow the cisgender white male rules on material strengths etc.

 

 

 

Gravity is a tool of patriarchic oppression!

 

 

Well can you blame em? Look what it does to their tits.

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Linear stress-strain curves are another example of hetero-cis-white-male thinking that oppresses womyn and minorities (except south Asians and Asians in general).

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Isn't this the standard in modern academia? I thought all professors everywhere completely agreed with insanity like this, and this was not out of the normal mainstream of modern university thought. While indicative of someone who is completely out of touch with reality, I though almost all professors and learned scholars agreed with stuff like this, and the feminist math people.....

 

Feminist scientists say citing research by straight, white men promotes ‘a system of oppression’

 

Academics and scholars must be mindful about using research done by only straight, white men, according to two scientists who argued that it oppresses diverse voices and bolsters the status of already privileged and established white male scholars.
Geographers Carrie Mott and Daniel Cockayne argued in a recent paper that doing so also perpetuates what they call “white heteromasculinism,” which they defined as a “system of oppression” that benefits only those who are “white, male, able-bodied, economically privileged, heterosexual, and cisgendered.” (Cisgendered describes people whose gender identity matches their birth sex.)
Mott, a professor at Rutgers University in New Jersey, and Cockayne, who teaches at the University of Waterloo in Ontario, argued that scholars or researchers disproportionately cite the work of white men, thereby unfairly adding credence to the body of knowledge they offer while ignoring the voices of other groups, like women and black male academics. Although citation seems like a mundane practice, the feminist professors argue that citing someone's work has implications on his or her ability to be hired, get promoted and obtain tenured status, among others.
[Women’s issues are different from trans women’s issues, feminist author says, sparking criticism]
“This important research has drawn direct attention to the continued underrepresentation and marginalization of women, people of color. … To cite narrowly, to only cite white men … or to only cite established scholars, does a disservice not only to researchers and writers who are othered by white heteromasculinism …," they wrote in the paper published recently in the journal Gender, Place and Culture.
Mott and Cockayne did not immediately respond to questions from The Washington Post, but Mott told Campus Reform last week that they decided to write about citation practices after observing that research done by white men are relied upon more heavily than those done by experts from other backgrounds.
Excited to share the @GPCjournal paper that @mott_carrie and I wrote, "Citation matters." Check it out here! https://t.co/zSQHM2FciN
— Daniel Cockayne (@insistondoubt) June 13, 2017
Work done by women and other minorities have often been overlooked by their peers, hindering their professional advancement and depriving disciplines of diverse perspectives, she argued.
When citations are predominantly those of the work of white, straight males, “this means that the views and knowledge that are represented do not reflect the experience of people from other backgrounds,” she told Campus Reform. “When scholars continue to cite only white men on a given topic, they ignore the broader diversity of voices and researchers that are also doing important work on that topic.”
In their 22-page paper, “Citation matters: mobilizing the politics of citation toward a practice of 'conscientious engagement,'" they explained that their work was motivated by “shared feelings of discomfort, frustration, and anger” over actions of fellow scholars and publication practices.
The authors offer what they describe as practical strategies for fellow geographers who work in a largely male-dominated discipline. According to the American Association of Geographers, men and women account for 62 percent and 38 percent of its members, respectively.
[Feminist group alleges sexually hostile environment at U of Mary Washington]
One of them: Scholars should read through their work and count all the citations before submitting their work for publication, and see how many people of diverse backgrounds — women, people of color, early-career scholars, graduate students and non-academics — are cited.
“Today, the field is more diverse, but this diversity is largely represented by earlier career scholars. Citing only tenured, established scholars means that these voices are ignored, especially when it is well-known that today's brutally competitive academic job market continues to privilege the white heteromasculinist body,” they wrote.
Speaking of Science newsletter
The latest and greatest in science news.
Sign up
Editors and reviewers also can act as watchdogs of sort by scrutinizing a scholar's body of citation, they argued.
Campus Reform writer said she asked the researchers whether the disparity in citations is simply because there are more men than women in the field of geography. In response, Cockayne said their point is that research done by “marginalized voices” is often ignored.
Rutgers and Cockayne both describe themselves as feminists and have done research related to feminism.
Rutgers also focuses her research on race and social justice, among other things. She describes herself as a “feminist political geographer,” who's interested in “how resistance movements mobilize to fight against state-sponsored violence and marginalization.” Cockayne's research and interest are on digital media, entrepreneurship, and gender and sexuality.

 

 

 

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My younger sister is the Dean in an university, of course mixed, and at the slightest whiff of this kind of stupidity the roar would be worse than Mt Pinatubo!

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