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Rinkeby is 91% immigrant with Somali as the predominant group. As far as I can tell, the red coalition (Social Democrats, Vänsterpartiel, Miljöpartiet de Gröna and Feministisk initiativ) won the majority in that part of Stockholm in the last election, so how is Rinkeby run by right-leaning parties?

 

 

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Soren

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Rinkeby is 91% immigrant with Somali as the predominant group. As far as I can tell, the red coalition (Social Democrats, Vänsterpartiel, Miljöpartiet de Gröna and Feministisk initiativ) won the majority in that part of Stockholm in the last election, so how is Rinkeby run by right-leaning parties?

 

 

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Soren

Since it's Stockholm and Stockholm is run by Moderaterna, Liberalerna, Centerpartiet and Miljöpartiet. Mostly because of that reason.

Wheter these are "right wing" parties or not can be debated but Moderaterna is at least the most right wing there is in Sweden without being silly.

 

/R

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Generally speaking, Swedish police is not highly thought of amongst other Nordics...

 

Spot the Swede! :P

 

here-to-protect-you.jpg

Ok, I admit, I don't think I quite get it.

 

It's from the Nordic Brothers web comic. The series illustrates the differences in the nordic peoples with nods to the sub groups like Faroes, Saami, etc.

 

Far left is Iceland. He and his sister always have those littles stars and goggles cause they're just strange and spacey. Sometimes they have little lava demons.

Next is Norway and Danish Police (gold braid vs little gold shield). Sweden is in all black. And Finland in the dark blue. Sweden is being the odd one out, dancing badly and making everyone else annoyed.

 

Original page:

https://satwcomic.com/here-to-protect-you

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Rinkeby is 91% immigrant with Somali as the predominant group. As far as I can tell, the red coalition (Social Democrats, Vänsterpartiel, Miljöpartiet de Gröna and Feministisk initiativ) won the majority in that part of Stockholm in the last election, so how is Rinkeby run by right-leaning parties?

 

 

--

Soren

Since it's Stockholm and Stockholm is run by Moderaterna, Liberalerna, Centerpartiet and Miljöpartiet. Mostly because of that reason.

Wheter these are "right wing" parties or not can be debated but Moderaterna is at least the most right wing there is in Sweden without being silly.

 

/R

 

Ok, thanks.

 

--

Soren

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Generally speaking, Swedish police is not highly thought of amongst other Nordics...

 

Spot the Swede! :P

 

here-to-protect-you.jpg

Ok, I admit, I don't think I quite get it.

 

It's from the Nordic Brothers web comic. The series illustrates the differences in the nordic peoples with nods to the sub groups like Faroes, Saami, etc.

 

Far left is Iceland. He and his sister always have those littles stars and goggles cause they're just strange and spacey. Sometimes they have little lava demons.

Next is Norway and Danish Police (gold braid vs little gold shield). Sweden is in all black. And Finland in the dark blue. Sweden is being the odd one out, dancing badly and making everyone else annoyed.

 

Original page:

https://satwcomic.com/here-to-protect-you

 

Mildly amusing, thanks. ABBA?

Edited by Rick
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That also sums up common perception of the Swedish police - good for publicity and PC, not that great with actual crime... :P

Ouch, that is not good. Could Stieg Larson have it right in his Girl trilogy?

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That also sums up common perception of the Swedish police - good for publicity and PC, not that great with actual crime... :P

 

So Wallander is accurate or not?

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Wallander was competent. And the novels were, in any case, more about the changes of the 1990s Swedish society since the 1960s and 70s. And let's not forget, they were novels. As in, the Fiction shelf.

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The series was fine. Ive never been able to read the novels. Maybe the translation sucked.

 

There is a long history in Swedish society of using crime novels to express political stances. For example, the authors of the popular Martin Beck series of novels were Swedish Communists. Although to be fair, its hard to note any political stance at all in the modern adaptation which I thoroughly enjoyed.

https://usefulstooges.com/2016/02/23/swedens-communist-crime-writers/

 

Its quite interesting. We have never had the kind of crossover between political awareness and crime fiction in the UK. I would guess the nearest we got was Charles Dickens.

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One or two Ian Rankins came close.

Donna Leon would also fall into that category, with Commissario Brunetti of Venice.

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Wallander was competent. And the novels were, in any case, more about the changes of the 1990s Swedish society since the 1960s and 70s. And let's not forget, they were novels. As in, the Fiction shelf.

I was thinking more about some of the gun handling I saw on the show. When I saw it I hucked a large chunk of salt over my shoulder. Which is of course why I asked above. On the flip side, I've seen how NYPD is VERY variable in their gun handling. Some being highly competent, some being barely competent stooges.

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Gun use is a very, very peripheral topic in the novels. Can't comment on the TV adaptation, never bothered watching them, despite featuring Kenneth Branagh. WRT competence, I referred to Wallander as the lead investigator in homicide. He definitely was no Harry Bosch, though.

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One or two Ian Rankins came close.

Donna Leon would also fall into that category, with Commissario Brunetti of Venice.

Yeah fair one on Rankin actually. Set in Darkness is one of my favourites, and is political commentary dressed up as murder. One of his best I think.

 

I struggle to think of any others at the moment.

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Let it Bleed was "the other one" of Rankin's novels that resonated with me in particular, though probably highly specific of Scotland's mid 1990s political situation.

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There is also Naming of the Dead, where you spend the entire novel wondering who killed one person who fell from Edinburgh Castle, and whats left unstated is who was responsible for the hundreds of dead in the Iraq named in the peace march. Not his most subtle Ill grant you, but it was a valid observation. Reminded me of what Stalin said, one death is a tragedy, a million deaths is a statistic.

 

Rankin is a fairly unusual author even by Scottish standards of course.

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Gun use is a very, very peripheral topic in the novels. Can't comment on the TV adaptation, never bothered watching them, despite featuring Kenneth Branagh. WRT competence, I referred to Wallander as the lead investigator in homicide. He definitely was no Harry Bosch, though.

 

There was a Swedish iteration first I think...I watched that before the British Adaptation.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wallander_(Swedish_TV_series)

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Somewhat contradictory. The police usually score pretty high in polls on trust but is often criticised for not being open enough, if the internet is to be trusted then there are plenty of police officers that feel the organisation as a whole and senior management in particular do not like to have current SOP/priorities discussed/criticised at all. The public/media seem to be more concerned with a perceived lack of resources. There's never a cop around when you need him and lots of cases are dropped without being investigated at all because of low priority. The main reason why you report a burglary or any other minor crime to the police is because the insurance company demands it, no one expects it to be solved or the culprits punished. Wether this is true or not is hard to say, police management say no but fewer and fewer ordinary people seem to believe them.

 

The general view of the criminal courts, once again a picture fed by media, is that they demand extra ordinary levels of certainty in many cases leading to few convictions or when convicted to minimum sentences.

 

This is of course only my own perception and it only relates to the situation in Sweden.

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