Jump to content
tanknet.org

Bestest Korea Icbm Test Launch


Recommended Posts

  • Replies 2.2k
  • Created
  • Last Reply

Top Posters In This Topic

Not to stray into FFZ territory, but Trump has always been about the optics rather than the substance (definitely as seen in his business career, hell, even in The Art of the Deal). He's the consummate empty-shell salesman. I don't really think he cares in the slightest about actually reducing NK's nuclear capability and if anybody calls him on it, he'll just lie about it and at least 30 percent of the country will believe him because Trump.

Link to post
Share on other sites

The 30 percent will believe him because he does deliver on pent-up points that they have cared about for a long time; immigration, fighting back vs media, 2nd amendment, supreme court judges, Obama care, NATO contribution sharing, etc. On these points, Trump is their man. To voice disagreement with Trump on other things, such kissing up to Fat Kim or defending his use of the word nationalist, would give shooting points to opposition which puts in a more vulnerable position the points they want to not risk losing. So they go all in with everything Trump does. It's not necessarily a new dynamic. Pretty sure such a dynamic existed during Obama years as well.

Link to post
Share on other sites

At this point it's probably worth noting again that the Trump-Kim summit agreement doesn't include any tangible provisions about reducing DPRK nuclear weapons or ballistic missiles.

 

 

President Trump and Chairman Kim Jong Un state the following:

  1. The United States and the DPRK commit to establish new U.S.-DPRK relations in accordance with the desire of the peoples of the two countries for peace and prosperity.
  2. The United States and the DPRK will join their efforts to build a lasting and stable peace regime on the Korean Peninsula.
  3. Reaffirming the April 27, 2018 Panmunjom Declaration, the DPRK commits to work towards the complete denuclearization of the Korean Peninsula.
  4. The United States and the DPRK commit to recovering POW/MIAremains including the immediate repatriation of those already identified.
Edited by Der Zeitgeist
Link to post
Share on other sites

Nothing else done by the other Presidents worked either, and Trumps administration has to work with SK as well and what they are willing to play along with. Trump can ratchet up military exercises, airspace intrusions, weapon systems deployments and EW stuff. NK will have to burn up valuable stocks to respond. Plus NK cannot not to afford to keep their military at a high state for to long, someone has to tend the crops and blackmail the citizens. China has shown that it's not that keen on heating up the region over NK and does not want further sanctions, so NK will be going it more or less alone.

Link to post
Share on other sites

I think my main gripe with Trump is that he met with Kim and acted like no one else could have done that, while basically everyone else simply refused to do it on principle. He then declared that North Korea was removed as a threat, which was blatant lie even for him. I don't expect him to solve this problem; no one else has. I just find it annoying he pretended like it was solved and that 30% of the population believes him. That is a a situation that doesn't have a democratic party equivalent, so I don't think one can just say same-same, everybody does it.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Nothing else done by the other Presidents worked either, and Trumps administration has to work with SK as well and what they are willing to play along with. Trump can ratchet up military exercises, airspace intrusions, weapon systems deployments and EW stuff. NK will have to burn up valuable stocks to respond. Plus NK cannot not to afford to keep their military at a high state for to long, someone has to tend the crops and blackmail the citizens. China has shown that it's not that keen on heating up the region over NK and does not want further sanctions, so NK will be going it more or less alone.

 

China was willing to play ball before the sanctions war. But, now the sanctions war is underway because Trump wants to confront everyone at once, and NK is just another front.

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 1 month later...

Putin about relations with Japan, ICBM defence etc

 

About the Okinawa part, well even though I typically take opposition to Russia's interests, but just like politicians not getting it quite right even if in the same camp, so I don't mean to target him specifically right now but Putin exaggerated on some points about Okinawa.

 

First off, he states that the Okinawan are against the new base (more specifically, the transfer of Futenma to Henoko). This was a big point in the recent governor election. Even though the anti-base candidate won, he won with 55%. It's a comfortable number for winning an election. But it also shows that the degree of anti base sentiment in Okinawa is not that high. By how Putin put it, a listening could visualize something like 80% would have voted for the anti-base governor. I think it is also worth considering that given the critical nature of Okinawa bases and its strategic location, it is a magnet for the anti-base crowd, not only Japanese but from abroad, from commie Chinese and Koreans to libtard Australians. So it could be worse for the pro-base camp, which does exist, and the right wing is very pro-base.

 

Another point Putin said that the Okinawa governor is powerless to stop the transfer of the base. Although it really is a national issue, not a prefecture issue. And Putin did not point out that the Japanese government supports the base transfer, as illustrated recently here, which is a necessary point for getting the whole picture.

 

What else should be considered is that the base going from Futenma to Henoko removes a base that is surrounded by dense residential areas to an area off the coast and far less intrusive to daily life. Concerns about helicopter parts falling or the noise will be greatly reduced when the transfer to Henoko is completed as illustrated in this old post.

 

It should also be considered that along with the base transfer, there has been a reduction in overall territory used by US forces when a little more than half of the Northern Training Area was returned to Okinawa.

Link to post
Share on other sites

I do not appreciate the way Tokyo and Abe have been completely shut out of direct participation in the ongoing conversation regarding the future of the Korean peninsula, but I must grudgingly acknowledge the benefits of the stabilizing effect of that conversation on Northeast Asia as a whole.

 

Now if only the Koreans could somehow be persuaded to face eastward and negotiate with Tokyo regarding Takeshima and their comfort women crusade with the same good faith as they have shown toward their brothers to the north in various ways.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Fat-Kim making speech for new year which included a call for inter-korea projects to go forward.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2mvI5UNPgw8

 

Full address (with no translation)

 

In the address was his offer of conditions including the lifting of sanctions for denuclearization.

 

 

 

North Korean leader Kim Jong-un’s comment about nuclear weapons in his New Year’s speech has evoked mixed responses from experts here.

“We declared at home and abroad that we would neither make and test nuclear weapons any longer nor use and proliferate them, and we have taken various practical measures,” Kim said in a televised address on Tuesday.

Thae Yong-ho, a former North Korean diplomat, said Kim’s speech shows there is no change in Kim’s stance on clinging to nuclear weapons.

“His 2019 policies toward the US and South Korea are likely aiming for a stronger strategic position as a nuclear state and seeking the lifting of sanctions by narrowing down the nuclear talks with the US to nuclear arms reduction,” Thae said.

He warned that South Korea and the US will not be able to make significant progress in building their relationships with North Korea this year if Washington pursues North Korea’s dismantling of its nuclear weapons program.

Two other phrases from the address that caught experts’ attention were “build a lasting and durable peace regime” and “advance toward complete denuclearization,” both of which Kim expressed his willingness to do.

The use of the term “denuclearization” marks a meaningful step for the North Korean leader, who had not publicly used the word before, according to Park Won-kon, a professor of international relations at Handong Global University.

“There is still controversy as to whether North Korea wants genuine denuclearization, but what is clear is that the message was carefully designed for US President Donald Trump to hold a second summit swiftly,” Park said.

The North’s key purpose for the speech is to secure a favorable deal at the meeting with Trump as it did from the first summit in Singapore in June, when Pyongyang gained significant benefits, such as the suspension of US-South Korea joint military exercises, he said.

Having agreed to work toward the complete denuclearization of the Korean Peninsula, the North has not conducted any missile tests since Kim and Trump’s meeting.

Yet a moratorium on nuclear tests and long-range missile launches was not part of the summit agreement.

“Kim’s pledge that the nation will not make nuclear weapons is a message for the US, giving the US a small gift by adding ‘the making’ part on what Trump wanted -- no nuclear and missile tests,” said Shin Bum-cheol, a senior fellow at the Seoul-based Asan Institute for Policy Studies.

http://www.koreaherald.com/view.php?ud=20190103000735

 

 

 

 

The United States should first drop its push for sanctions and pressure against North Korea if a second summit between the two countries is going to happen, a pro-North Korean newspaper in Japan said Wednesday.

"If the U.S. president moves from his anachronistic mindset bent on sanctions to resolve anything and also from a variant version of talk of adjusting speeds (on negotiations) and draws up a right 2019 business plan, it would be possible to find a clue to the second summit between North Korea and the U.S.," the Choson Sinbo said in an article.

In his New Year's Day address, North Korean leader Kim Jong-un said that he is committed to complete denuclearization and ready for a second summit with U.S. President Donald Trump. But he also demanded the U.S. drop its sanctions-oriented policy, warning of a new way unless the demand is met.

Kim and Trump held their first-ever summit in June in Singapore where the North Korean leader agreed to work toward the complete denuclearization of the Korean Peninsula in exchange for "new relations" with and security guarantees from Washington.

Subsequent talks, however, have been stalled in recent months as the two countries have failed to iron out differences over the sequencing of the denuclearization process.

North Korea demands sanctions relief or removal from the U.S. to reciprocate what it claims to be substantive measures it has taken since the June summit. Washington wants more concrete steps.

"There was no meaningful first step taken toward the implementation of the joint declaration (adopted in the June summit)," the paper said. "The U.S. negotiation team rather pushed forward to demand unilateral nuclear disarmament with sanctions and pressure running counter to the spirit of the declaration.

The paper added that there could be an "epoch-making event" in the relations between the two countries this year if Washington does all it has to do in its side of the deal.

In response to Kim's speech Tuesday, Trump tweeted that he is looking forward to a second summit with the North Korean leader. He earlier said that the meeting with Kim could take place in January or February. (Yonhap)

http://www.koreatimes.co.kr/www/nation/2019/01/103_261350.html

 

ROK's unification ministry responded that international consultation and denuclearization would be needed. Although in Kim's speech he talked in way that the international community was in support of DPRK's side. So a difference as to what international community is being referred to.

 

 

 

The Unification Ministry said Wednesday that close consultation with the international community is required in considering the resumption of a South-North industrial complex and tour program, following North Korean leader Kim Jong-un’s call for the restart of inter-Korean projects.

“As agreed before, it is necessary at this moment for us to focus on creating the conditions,” Unification Ministry spokesman Baik Tae-hyun told reporters Wednesday. “Also, it is a matter that should be pursued in consultation not just between the South and the North but also with the international community and possible stakeholders in our countries.”

The stakeholders include businessmen who worked at the Kaesong industrial park and Hyundai Asan, which was heavily involved in the complex, he said.

North Korean leader Kim called for expanding inter-Korean cooperation and exchanges in an effort to strengthen national unity, in his New Year’s speech Tuesday.

“For the present, we are willing to resume the Kaesong industrial park and Kumgangsan tourism without any precondition and in return for nothing, in consideration of the hard conditions of businesspersons of the south side who had advanced into the Kaesong industrial park and the desire of southern compatriots who are eager to visit the nation’s celebrated mountain,” Kim said.

During a television program Tuesday night, South Korean Unification Minister Cho Myoung-gyon said the resumption of projects would be a priority if denuclearization takes place.

“We will seek what we can do within the boundaries of sanctions in preparation for reopening in the future,” he said.

Although South Korean President Moon Jae-in and Kim agreed to normalized the two economic projects during their summit in Pyongyang in September, international sanctions on the North have prevented further progress.

The joint factory complex in the border city of Kaesong has been closed since 2016, and the operation of the tourist program at Kumgangsan has been halted since 2008.

http://www.koreaherald.com/view.php?ud=20190102000602

 

In the meantime, POTUS got a "nice letter" from Kim about a possible second summit which has been talked about before in the second half of last year.

 

 

 

U.S. President Donald Trump said Wednesday that he has received a letter from North Korean leader Kim Jong Un and will be setting up a meeting with Kim ''in the not-too-distant future'' to restart talks about the North's nuclear programs.

''He'd like to meet. I'd like to meet,'' Trump said as he held up the letter during a Cabinet meeting.

Earlier in the day, Trump tweeted: ''Kim Jong Un says North Korea will not make or test nuclear weapons, or give them to others _ & he is ready to meet President Trump anytime.''

Kim has met several times with the leader of South Korea and attended a summit in Singapore with Trump in June. Kim has signed vague statements pledging a nuclear-free Korean Peninsula, but has not described how and when that might occur.

In a New Year's message, Kim hinted at a possible cap on nuclear weapons production if the U.S. took equivalent steps. He did not elaborate. He also stood by his commitment on denuclearization, which does not mean the unilateral ridding of the North's arsenal. Both areas need to be further clarified in negotiations.

Kim sees such weapons as a valuable deterrent to a possible U.S. military strike. He also believes his weapons put him in a position of strength from which he can make demands and extract concessions.

The message he is conveying to Trump is for the American leader to start addressing his concerns about security and easing sanctions or the North Korean will have no choice but to try a different, less-friendly approach. Kim is warning that he will be able to make a case to China, Russia and possibly even South Korea that if the situation deteriorates, Washington will be to blame.

During the Cabinet meeting, Trump lamented that he's not been given enough credit for opening a dialogue with North Korea. Trump said his engagement with North Korea helped stave off what he said ''could have been World War III.''

But he and Kim spent most of 2017 exchanging personal insults and war threats before agreeing to their meeting in Singapore.

''You know, frankly, if this administration didn't take place, if another administration came in instead of this administration ... you'd be at war right now,'' he told reporters. ''You'd be having a nice, big fat war in Asia. And it wouldn't be pleasant.''

Before Trump took office, the United States engaged in four major negotiations with North Korea over its nuclear and missile programs, stretching from the mid-1990s to about 2012. All were aimed at getting North Korea to halt or disable its nuclear missile programs in exchange for economic and diplomatic concessions.

Trump also said North Korea has tremendous economic potential so he looked forward to meeting again with Kim. ''We'll set that up,'' he said. ''We'll be setting that up in the not too distant future.'' (AP)

http://www.koreatimes.co.kr/www/nation/2019/01/103_261392.html

 

 

 

 

US President Donald Trump on Wednesday revealed that he received a “great letter” from North Korean leader Kim Jong-un.

Speaking at a cabinet meeting, Trump said that he received a letter from Kim, and reiterated his belief that North Korea is seeking real changes, and once again stressed his part in North Korea-related developments.

Claiming that his meeting with Kim in Singapore on June 12 prevented a “big fat war” in Asia, Trump said that North Korea wants changes. Trump, however, did not provide any hints on the second summit with Kim saying only that he is “not in any rush” to hold the meeting, which he has said will be held early this year.

Despite Trump’s repeated statements regarding his relationship with Kim, which he once compared to falling in love, little progress has been made since the June 12 US-North Korea summit.

In contrast to Trump’s public display of confidence, US national security adviser John Bolton has suggested that the US president’s plans for the second summit are motivated by the lack of progress.

Working level talks between Pyongyang and Washington have failed to produce any real results regarding denuclearization, with both sides unwilling to give concessions.

Pyongyang continues to demand that the US take measures corresponding to steps it has taken, while the US has reiterated time and again that sanctions will remain in place until denuclearization is verified.

Due in part to lack of progress, even South Korea’s conservatives, usually staunch supporters of the US and its leaders in North Korean matters, appear to be growing skeptical of Trump.

Speaking at a forum held Tuesday, conservative main opposition Liberty Korea Party’s Rep. Kim Moo-sung claimed that Trump should not be trusted, claiming that the US nuclear umbrella is the only deterrent against the North Korean nuclear threat.

North Korea, meanwhile, may be seeking means to offset uncertainties arising from its dealings with the US.

In his New Year speech, Kim Jong-un suggested that there was a need to “actively promote multi-party negotiations” among the signatories of the armistice to establish peace on the Korean Peninsula to “lay a lasting and substantial peace-keeping foundation.”

In a report released on Wednesday, Seoul’s Korea Institute for National Unification said that Pyongyang may be becoming more accepting of inter-Korean agreements, while hedging its bets.

The Panmunjom Declaration signed at the April 27 inter-Korean summit states that the two sides will seek three- or four-way peace talks. A three-way talks will involve the two Koreas and the US, and the four-way talks would include China. North Korea, however, had maintained that a peace talks is a matter for discussion with the US.

“From North Korea’s point of view, it is highly likely that a multilateral negotiation was suggested as a mechanism to buffer against uncertainties in US-North Korea negotiations,” the report said.

“It is likely that by stating (participants of the multilateral negotiations to be) signatories of the armistice (North Korea) has China’s participation in mind.”

trumpboltonletter.jpg

http://www.koreaherald.com/view.php?ud=20190103000567

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 2 weeks later...

Kim made a splendid visit to China and met Xi.

 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KCD7nYxTDq8

 

Xi might visit DPRK later among other stuff.

 

 

SEOUL, Jan. 10 (Yonhap) -- Cautious optimism is growing over a much-anticipated summit between Washington and Pyongyang, as North Korean leader Kim Jong-un has formally secured support from Chinese President Xi Jinping for his plan to meet again with President Donald Trump, analysts said Thursday.

During his meeting with Kim in Beijing earlier this week, Xi threw his weight behind Pyongyang's "continued adherence to the direction of denuclearization" and backed North Korea and the U.S. "holding summits and achieving results," China's Xinhua News Agency reported.

Reaffirming his denuclearization commitment, Kim also said that he will make efforts to achieve results from the possible summit with Trump, which would be "welcomed by the international community," it added.

On Thursday morning, Kim completed his four-day visit to China, which analysts said was aimed at making sure that ties between the communist allies were close ahead of the summit with Trump expected to take place in the coming weeks or months.

Kim and Trump are apparently preparing for their second meeting in a bid to break an apparent deadlock in their negotiations over the North's nuclear disarmament for U.S. security guarantees and other support. Trump said publicly that the summit location will probably be announced "in the not-too-distant future."

Analysts said that Xi's backing for Pyongyang's steps toward denuclearization -- or its oblique pressure for progress on the issue -- and Kim's desire for fruitful outcomes from talks with Trump will create fresh momentum for peace efforts on the divided peninsula.

"The summit this time with Xi is an effort by Kim to reassure China that the North stands with its communist ally ahead of a possible major deal with the U.S., and an effort to ensure that it has China to fall back on (should talks with Washington fall apart)," Kim Heung-kyu, a China expert at Ajou University, told Yonhap News Agency.

"In a nutshell, Kim's visit to Beijing this time can be construed as his will to move toward a major step toward denuclearization," he added.

Kim has many reasons to push for a major deal with Washington this year, analysts said. Chief among them is his pledge to develop his country's threadbare economy, for which Pyongyang needs sanctions relief from Washington.

Kim's New Year speech focused on economic development, along with his desire for inter-Korean exchanges and olive branches to the United States that are required to address his country's pressing bread-and-butter issues.

Xi's rhetoric in support of the North's denuclearization appears to highlight the similarity of China's interests to those of the U.S. in promoting stability on the peninsula, particularly when it is negotiating a trade deal with the U.S.

Observers said that Xi might have tried to persuade Kim to make further tangible steps toward his country's nuclear disarmament given that, absent such steps, criticism could arise that Beijing has failed to deliver on its pledge to play a "constructive role" in peace efforts on the peninsula.

"There could be a considerable burden on the part of China if Pyongyang fails to make any significant step towards denuclearization," Park Won-gon, professor of international relations at Handong Global University, said.

During the latest trip to China, Kim invited Xi to visit Pyongyang, the North's official Korean Central News Agency reported, offering a glimpse into his plans for summit diplomacy this year.

Xi has "gladly" accepted the offer and notified the North of his schedule, it added without elaborating.

Kim's diplomatic drive this year is likely to focus on fostering conditions conducive to his peace rhetoric and strategic emphasis on economic development, observers said.

Should Xi visit the North, the summit agenda could include supplanting the armistice agreement that halted the 1950-53 Korean War with a peace treaty, which Pyongyang apparently believes will help ensure the security of its regime.

Kim has said that he would actively pursue multilateral negotiations over the peace treaty to "craft a foundation for an enduring peace."

For Xi, his visit to Pyongyang, if it materializes, may facilitate his efforts to maintain influence over the peninsula amid worries that a Washington-Pyongyang peace deal could cause the North to tilt away from Beijing.

After all, Kim's visit to Beijing this week underscored his sense of urgency before a summit with Trump.

Pyongyang has been under mounting U.S. pressure to make clear steps on denuclearization, such as a full declaration of its nuclear and missile programs. However, it wants Washington to take "corresponding measures," such as sanctions relief.

In his New Year's address, Kim said his regime may explore a "new path" should Washington stick to pressure and sanctions.

 

 

https://en.yna.co.kr/view/AEN20190110004151315?section=nk/nk

Edited by JasonJ
Link to post
Share on other sites

Interesting to see that Kim's visit with Xi may soon be followed by a meeting between Abe and Kim in the not-so-distant future. Such a meeting has logic to it, as Trump's Washington can no longer be trusted to competently convey notice of Japanese interests to Pyongyang.

 

In any case, conveying notice of Japanese interests to Koreans directly has always been the best approach, from 1592 onward.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Fat-Kim making speech for new year which included a call for inter-korea projects to go forward.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2mvI5UNPgw8

 

Full address (with no translation)

 

In the address was his offer of conditions including the lifting of sanctions for denuclearization.

 

 

 

North Korean leader Kim Jong-un’s comment about nuclear weapons in his New Year’s speech has evoked mixed responses from experts here.

 

“We declared at home and abroad that we would neither make and test nuclear weapons any longer nor use and proliferate them, and we have taken various practical measures,” Kim said in a televised address on Tuesday.

 

Thae Yong-ho, a former North Korean diplomat, said Kim’s speech shows there is no change in Kim’s stance on clinging to nuclear weapons.

 

“His 2019 policies toward the US and South Korea are likely aiming for a stronger strategic position as a nuclear state and seeking the lifting of sanctions by narrowing down the nuclear talks with the US to nuclear arms reduction,” Thae said.

 

He warned that South Korea and the US will not be able to make significant progress in building their relationships with North Korea this year if Washington pursues North Korea’s dismantling of its nuclear weapons program.

 

Two other phrases from the address that caught experts’ attention were “build a lasting and durable peace regime” and “advance toward complete denuclearization,” both of which Kim expressed his willingness to do.

 

The use of the term “denuclearization” marks a meaningful step for the North Korean leader, who had not publicly used the word before, according to Park Won-kon, a professor of international relations at Handong Global University.

 

“There is still controversy as to whether North Korea wants genuine denuclearization, but what is clear is that the message was carefully designed for US President Donald Trump to hold a second summit swiftly,” Park said.

 

The North’s key purpose for the speech is to secure a favorable deal at the meeting with Trump as it did from the first summit in Singapore in June, when Pyongyang gained significant benefits, such as the suspension of US-South Korea joint military exercises, he said.

 

Having agreed to work toward the complete denuclearization of the Korean Peninsula, the North has not conducted any missile tests since Kim and Trump’s meeting.

 

Yet a moratorium on nuclear tests and long-range missile launches was not part of the summit agreement.

 

“Kim’s pledge that the nation will not make nuclear weapons is a message for the US, giving the US a small gift by adding ‘the making’ part on what Trump wanted -- no nuclear and missile tests,” said Shin Bum-cheol, a senior fellow at the Seoul-based Asan Institute for Policy Studies.

http://www.koreaherald.com/view.php?ud=20190103000735

 

 

 

 

The United States should first drop its push for sanctions and pressure against North Korea if a second summit between the two countries is going to happen, a pro-North Korean newspaper in Japan said Wednesday.

 

"If the U.S. president moves from his anachronistic mindset bent on sanctions to resolve anything and also from a variant version of talk of adjusting speeds (on negotiations) and draws up a right 2019 business plan, it would be possible to find a clue to the second summit between North Korea and the U.S.," the Choson Sinbo said in an article.

 

In his New Year's Day address, North Korean leader Kim Jong-un said that he is committed to complete denuclearization and ready for a second summit with U.S. President Donald Trump. But he also demanded the U.S. drop its sanctions-oriented policy, warning of a new way unless the demand is met.

 

Kim and Trump held their first-ever summit in June in Singapore where the North Korean leader agreed to work toward the complete denuclearization of the Korean Peninsula in exchange for "new relations" with and security guarantees from Washington.

 

Subsequent talks, however, have been stalled in recent months as the two countries have failed to iron out differences over the sequencing of the denuclearization process.

 

North Korea demands sanctions relief or removal from the U.S. to reciprocate what it claims to be substantive measures it has taken since the June summit. Washington wants more concrete steps.

 

"There was no meaningful first step taken toward the implementation of the joint declaration (adopted in the June summit)," the paper said. "The U.S. negotiation team rather pushed forward to demand unilateral nuclear disarmament with sanctions and pressure running counter to the spirit of the declaration.

 

The paper added that there could be an "epoch-making event" in the relations between the two countries this year if Washington does all it has to do in its side of the deal.

 

In response to Kim's speech Tuesday, Trump tweeted that he is looking forward to a second summit with the North Korean leader. He earlier said that the meeting with Kim could take place in January or February. (Yonhap)

http://www.koreatimes.co.kr/www/nation/2019/01/103_261350.html

 

ROK's unification ministry responded that international consultation and denuclearization would be needed. Although in Kim's speech he talked in way that the international community was in support of DPRK's side. So a difference as to what international community is being referred to.

 

 

 

The Unification Ministry said Wednesday that close consultation with the international community is required in considering the resumption of a South-North industrial complex and tour program, following North Korean leader Kim Jong-un’s call for the restart of inter-Korean projects.

 

“As agreed before, it is necessary at this moment for us to focus on creating the conditions,” Unification Ministry spokesman Baik Tae-hyun told reporters Wednesday. “Also, it is a matter that should be pursued in consultation not just between the South and the North but also with the international community and possible stakeholders in our countries.”

 

The stakeholders include businessmen who worked at the Kaesong industrial park and Hyundai Asan, which was heavily involved in the complex, he said.

 

North Korean leader Kim called for expanding inter-Korean cooperation and exchanges in an effort to strengthen national unity, in his New Year’s speech Tuesday.

 

“For the present, we are willing to resume the Kaesong industrial park and Kumgangsan tourism without any precondition and in return for nothing, in consideration of the hard conditions of businesspersons of the south side who had advanced into the Kaesong industrial park and the desire of southern compatriots who are eager to visit the nation’s celebrated mountain,” Kim said.

 

During a television program Tuesday night, South Korean Unification Minister Cho Myoung-gyon said the resumption of projects would be a priority if denuclearization takes place.

 

“We will seek what we can do within the boundaries of sanctions in preparation for reopening in the future,” he said.

 

Although South Korean President Moon Jae-in and Kim agreed to normalized the two economic projects during their summit in Pyongyang in September, international sanctions on the North have prevented further progress.

 

The joint factory complex in the border city of Kaesong has been closed since 2016, and the operation of the tourist program at Kumgangsan has been halted since 2008.

http://www.koreaherald.com/view.php?ud=20190102000602

 

In the meantime, POTUS got a "nice letter" from Kim about a possible second summit which has been talked about before in the second half of last year.

 

 

 

U.S. President Donald Trump said Wednesday that he has received a letter from North Korean leader Kim Jong Un and will be setting up a meeting with Kim ''in the not-too-distant future'' to restart talks about the North's nuclear programs.

 

''He'd like to meet. I'd like to meet,'' Trump said as he held up the letter during a Cabinet meeting.

 

Earlier in the day, Trump tweeted: ''Kim Jong Un says North Korea will not make or test nuclear weapons, or give them to others _ & he is ready to meet President Trump anytime.''

 

Kim has met several times with the leader of South Korea and attended a summit in Singapore with Trump in June. Kim has signed vague statements pledging a nuclear-free Korean Peninsula, but has not described how and when that might occur.

 

In a New Year's message, Kim hinted at a possible cap on nuclear weapons production if the U.S. took equivalent steps. He did not elaborate. He also stood by his commitment on denuclearization, which does not mean the unilateral ridding of the North's arsenal. Both areas need to be further clarified in negotiations.

 

Kim sees such weapons as a valuable deterrent to a possible U.S. military strike. He also believes his weapons put him in a position of strength from which he can make demands and extract concessions.

 

The message he is conveying to Trump is for the American leader to start addressing his concerns about security and easing sanctions or the North Korean will have no choice but to try a different, less-friendly approach. Kim is warning that he will be able to make a case to China, Russia and possibly even South Korea that if the situation deteriorates, Washington will be to blame.

 

During the Cabinet meeting, Trump lamented that he's not been given enough credit for opening a dialogue with North Korea. Trump said his engagement with North Korea helped stave off what he said ''could have been World War III.''

 

But he and Kim spent most of 2017 exchanging personal insults and war threats before agreeing to their meeting in Singapore.

 

''You know, frankly, if this administration didn't take place, if another administration came in instead of this administration ... you'd be at war right now,'' he told reporters. ''You'd be having a nice, big fat war in Asia. And it wouldn't be pleasant.''

 

Before Trump took office, the United States engaged in four major negotiations with North Korea over its nuclear and missile programs, stretching from the mid-1990s to about 2012. All were aimed at getting North Korea to halt or disable its nuclear missile programs in exchange for economic and diplomatic concessions.

 

Trump also said North Korea has tremendous economic potential so he looked forward to meeting again with Kim. ''We'll set that up,'' he said. ''We'll be setting that up in the not too distant future.'' (AP)

http://www.koreatimes.co.kr/www/nation/2019/01/103_261392.html

 

 

 

 

US President Donald Trump on Wednesday revealed that he received a “great letter” from North Korean leader Kim Jong-un.

 

Speaking at a cabinet meeting, Trump said that he received a letter from Kim, and reiterated his belief that North Korea is seeking real changes, and once again stressed his part in North Korea-related developments.

 

Claiming that his meeting with Kim in Singapore on June 12 prevented a “big fat war” in Asia, Trump said that North Korea wants changes. Trump, however, did not provide any hints on the second summit with Kim saying only that he is “not in any rush” to hold the meeting, which he has said will be held early this year.

 

Despite Trump’s repeated statements regarding his relationship with Kim, which he once compared to falling in love, little progress has been made since the June 12 US-North Korea summit.

 

In contrast to Trump’s public display of confidence, US national security adviser John Bolton has suggested that the US president’s plans for the second summit are motivated by the lack of progress.

 

Working level talks between Pyongyang and Washington have failed to produce any real results regarding denuclearization, with both sides unwilling to give concessions.

 

Pyongyang continues to demand that the US take measures corresponding to steps it has taken, while the US has reiterated time and again that sanctions will remain in place until denuclearization is verified.

 

Due in part to lack of progress, even South Korea’s conservatives, usually staunch supporters of the US and its leaders in North Korean matters, appear to be growing skeptical of Trump.

 

Speaking at a forum held Tuesday, conservative main opposition Liberty Korea Party’s Rep. Kim Moo-sung claimed that Trump should not be trusted, claiming that the US nuclear umbrella is the only deterrent against the North Korean nuclear threat.

 

North Korea, meanwhile, may be seeking means to offset uncertainties arising from its dealings with the US.

 

In his New Year speech, Kim Jong-un suggested that there was a need to “actively promote multi-party negotiations” among the signatories of the armistice to establish peace on the Korean Peninsula to “lay a lasting and substantial peace-keeping foundation.”

 

In a report released on Wednesday, Seoul’s Korea Institute for National Unification said that Pyongyang may be becoming more accepting of inter-Korean agreements, while hedging its bets.

 

The Panmunjom Declaration signed at the April 27 inter-Korean summit states that the two sides will seek three- or four-way peace talks. A three-way talks will involve the two Koreas and the US, and the four-way talks would include China. North Korea, however, had maintained that a peace talks is a matter for discussion with the US.

 

“From North Korea’s point of view, it is highly likely that a multilateral negotiation was suggested as a mechanism to buffer against uncertainties in US-North Korea negotiations,” the report said.

 

“It is likely that by stating (participants of the multilateral negotiations to be) signatories of the armistice (North Korea) has China’s participation in mind.”

trumpboltonletter.jpg

http://www.koreaherald.com/view.php?ud=20190103000567

 

A piece of paper? :P

Link to post
Share on other sites

Interesting to see that Kim's visit with Xi may soon be followed by a meeting between Abe and Kim in the not-so-distant future. Such a meeting has logic to it, as Trump's Washington can no longer be trusted to competently convey notice of Japanese interests to Pyongyang.

 

In any case, conveying notice of Japanese interests to Koreans directly has always been the best approach, from 1592 onward.

 

Well talk about a Abe-Kim summit has been since last summer.

 

US-DPRK talks have so far not been bad, but not so good. Yet still its tough circumstances in totality. But still, probably about time Abe meets fst-kim..

 

The years between Hideyoshi's invasion and the years of global imperialsim is long with generally good relations between Korea and Japan. There's most certainly more room for more emphasis on this time period combined with today's materialism. Part of the problem is that ROK is falling deeper in China orbit in ways of thinking, partly for the purpose of getting closer with DPRK. But many things may not be as they appear. ROK is also still at heart in principal democratic by being very anti-authority in general. Sometimes their anti-Japanese stuff could be a result of their general tendency to go on strikes and such.

Link to post
Share on other sites

 

Fat-Kim making speech for new year which included a call for inter-korea projects to go forward.

 

 

In the address was his offer of conditions including the lifting of sanctions for denuclearization.

 

 

 

 

North Korean leader Kim Jong-un’s comment about nuclear weapons in his New Year’s speech has evoked mixed responses from experts here.

“We declared at home and abroad that we would neither make and test nuclear weapons any longer nor use and proliferate them, and we have taken various practical measures,” Kim said in a televised address on Tuesday.

Thae Yong-ho, a former North Korean diplomat, said Kim’s speech shows there is no change in Kim’s stance on clinging to nuclear weapons.

“His 2019 policies toward the US and South Korea are likely aiming for a stronger strategic position as a nuclear state and seeking the lifting of sanctions by narrowing down the nuclear talks with the US to nuclear arms reduction,” Thae said.

He warned that South Korea and the US will not be able to make significant progress in building their relationships with North Korea this year if Washington pursues North Korea’s dismantling of its nuclear weapons program.

Two other phrases from the address that caught experts’ attention were “build a lasting and durable peace regime” and “advance toward complete denuclearization,” both of which Kim expressed his willingness to do.

The use of the term “denuclearization” marks a meaningful step for the North Korean leader, who had not publicly used the word before, according to Park Won-kon, a professor of international relations at Handong Global University.

“There is still controversy as to whether North Korea wants genuine denuclearization, but what is clear is that the message was carefully designed for US President Donald Trump to hold a second summit swiftly,” Park said.

The North’s key purpose for the speech is to secure a favorable deal at the meeting with Trump as it did from the first summit in Singapore in June, when Pyongyang gained significant benefits, such as the suspension of US-South Korea joint military exercises, he said.

Having agreed to work toward the complete denuclearization of the Korean Peninsula, the North has not conducted any missile tests since Kim and Trump’s meeting.

Yet a moratorium on nuclear tests and long-range missile launches was not part of the summit agreement.

“Kim’s pledge that the nation will not make nuclear weapons is a message for the US, giving the US a small gift by adding ‘the making’ part on what Trump wanted -- no nuclear and missile tests,” said Shin Bum-cheol, a senior fellow at the Seoul-based Asan Institute for Policy Studies.

 

http://www.koreaherald.com/view.php?ud=20190103000735

 

 

 

 

The United States should first drop its push for sanctions and pressure against North Korea if a second summit between the two countries is going to happen, a pro-North Korean newspaper in Japan said Wednesday.

"If the U.S. president moves from his anachronistic mindset bent on sanctions to resolve anything and also from a variant version of talk of adjusting speeds (on negotiations) and draws up a right 2019 business plan, it would be possible to find a clue to the second summit between North Korea and the U.S.," the Choson Sinbo said in an article.

In his New Year's Day address, North Korean leader Kim Jong-un said that he is committed to complete denuclearization and ready for a second summit with U.S. President Donald Trump. But he also demanded the U.S. drop its sanctions-oriented policy, warning of a new way unless the demand is met.

Kim and Trump held their first-ever summit in June in Singapore where the North Korean leader agreed to work toward the complete denuclearization of the Korean Peninsula in exchange for "new relations" with and security guarantees from Washington.

Subsequent talks, however, have been stalled in recent months as the two countries have failed to iron out differences over the sequencing of the denuclearization process.

North Korea demands sanctions relief or removal from the U.S. to reciprocate what it claims to be substantive measures it has taken since the June summit. Washington wants more concrete steps.

"There was no meaningful first step taken toward the implementation of the joint declaration (adopted in the June summit)," the paper said. "The U.S. negotiation team rather pushed forward to demand unilateral nuclear disarmament with sanctions and pressure running counter to the spirit of the declaration.

The paper added that there could be an "epoch-making event" in the relations between the two countries this year if Washington does all it has to do in its side of the deal.

In response to Kim's speech Tuesday, Trump tweeted that he is looking forward to a second summit with the North Korean leader. He earlier said that the meeting with Kim could take place in January or February. (Yonhap)

 

http://www.koreatimes.co.kr/www/nation/2019/01/103_261350.html

 

ROK's unification ministry responded that international consultation and denuclearization would be needed. Although in Kim's speech he talked in way that the international community was in support of DPRK's side. So a difference as to what international community is being referred to.

 

 

 

The Unification Ministry said Wednesday that close consultation with the international community is required in considering the resumption of a South-North industrial complex and tour program, following North Korean leader Kim Jong-un’s call for the restart of inter-Korean projects.

“As agreed before, it is necessary at this moment for us to focus on creating the conditions,” Unification Ministry spokesman Baik Tae-hyun told reporters Wednesday. “Also, it is a matter that should be pursued in consultation not just between the South and the North but also with the international community and possible stakeholders in our countries.”

The stakeholders include businessmen who worked at the Kaesong industrial park and Hyundai Asan, which was heavily involved in the complex, he said.

North Korean leader Kim called for expanding inter-Korean cooperation and exchanges in an effort to strengthen national unity, in his New Year’s speech Tuesday.

“For the present, we are willing to resume the Kaesong industrial park and Kumgangsan tourism without any precondition and in return for nothing, in consideration of the hard conditions of businesspersons of the south side who had advanced into the Kaesong industrial park and the desire of southern compatriots who are eager to visit the nation’s celebrated mountain,” Kim said.

During a television program Tuesday night, South Korean Unification Minister Cho Myoung-gyon said the resumption of projects would be a priority if denuclearization takes place.

“We will seek what we can do within the boundaries of sanctions in preparation for reopening in the future,” he said.

Although South Korean President Moon Jae-in and Kim agreed to normalized the two economic projects during their summit in Pyongyang in September, international sanctions on the North have prevented further progress.

The joint factory complex in the border city of Kaesong has been closed since 2016, and the operation of the tourist program at Kumgangsan has been halted since 2008.

 

http://www.koreaherald.com/view.php?ud=20190102000602

 

In the meantime, POTUS got a "nice letter" from Kim about a possible second summit which has been talked about before in the second half of last year.

 

 

 

U.S. President Donald Trump said Wednesday that he has received a letter from North Korean leader Kim Jong Un and will be setting up a meeting with Kim ''in the not-too-distant future'' to restart talks about the North's nuclear programs.

''He'd like to meet. I'd like to meet,'' Trump said as he held up the letter during a Cabinet meeting.

Earlier in the day, Trump tweeted: ''Kim Jong Un says North Korea will not make or test nuclear weapons, or give them to others _ & he is ready to meet President Trump anytime.''

Kim has met several times with the leader of South Korea and attended a summit in Singapore with Trump in June. Kim has signed vague statements pledging a nuclear-free Korean Peninsula, but has not described how and when that might occur.

In a New Year's message, Kim hinted at a possible cap on nuclear weapons production if the U.S. took equivalent steps. He did not elaborate. He also stood by his commitment on denuclearization, which does not mean the unilateral ridding of the North's arsenal. Both areas need to be further clarified in negotiations.

Kim sees such weapons as a valuable deterrent to a possible U.S. military strike. He also believes his weapons put him in a position of strength from which he can make demands and extract concessions.

The message he is conveying to Trump is for the American leader to start addressing his concerns about security and easing sanctions or the North Korean will have no choice but to try a different, less-friendly approach. Kim is warning that he will be able to make a case to China, Russia and possibly even South Korea that if the situation deteriorates, Washington will be to blame.

During the Cabinet meeting, Trump lamented that he's not been given enough credit for opening a dialogue with North Korea. Trump said his engagement with North Korea helped stave off what he said ''could have been World War III.''

But he and Kim spent most of 2017 exchanging personal insults and war threats before agreeing to their meeting in Singapore.

''You know, frankly, if this administration didn't take place, if another administration came in instead of this administration ... you'd be at war right now,'' he told reporters. ''You'd be having a nice, big fat war in Asia. And it wouldn't be pleasant.''

Before Trump took office, the United States engaged in four major negotiations with North Korea over its nuclear and missile programs, stretching from the mid-1990s to about 2012. All were aimed at getting North Korea to halt or disable its nuclear missile programs in exchange for economic and diplomatic concessions.

Trump also said North Korea has tremendous economic potential so he looked forward to meeting again with Kim. ''We'll set that up,'' he said. ''We'll be setting that up in the not too distant future.'' (AP)

 

http://www.koreatimes.co.kr/www/nation/2019/01/103_261392.html

 

 

 

 

US President Donald Trump on Wednesday revealed that he received a “great letter” from North Korean leader Kim Jong-un.

Speaking at a cabinet meeting, Trump said that he received a letter from Kim, and reiterated his belief that North Korea is seeking real changes, and once again stressed his part in North Korea-related developments.

Claiming that his meeting with Kim in Singapore on June 12 prevented a “big fat war” in Asia, Trump said that North Korea wants changes. Trump, however, did not provide any hints on the second summit with Kim saying only that he is “not in any rush” to hold the meeting, which he has said will be held early this year.

Despite Trump’s repeated statements regarding his relationship with Kim, which he once compared to falling in love, little progress has been made since the June 12 US-North Korea summit.

In contrast to Trump’s public display of confidence, US national security adviser John Bolton has suggested that the US president’s plans for the second summit are motivated by the lack of progress.

Working level talks between Pyongyang and Washington have failed to produce any real results regarding denuclearization, with both sides unwilling to give concessions.

Pyongyang continues to demand that the US take measures corresponding to steps it has taken, while the US has reiterated time and again that sanctions will remain in place until denuclearization is verified.

Due in part to lack of progress, even South Korea’s conservatives, usually staunch supporters of the US and its leaders in North Korean matters, appear to be growing skeptical of Trump.

Speaking at a forum held Tuesday, conservative main opposition Liberty Korea Party’s Rep. Kim Moo-sung claimed that Trump should not be trusted, claiming that the US nuclear umbrella is the only deterrent against the North Korean nuclear threat.

North Korea, meanwhile, may be seeking means to offset uncertainties arising from its dealings with the US.

In his New Year speech, Kim Jong-un suggested that there was a need to “actively promote multi-party negotiations” among the signatories of the armistice to establish peace on the Korean Peninsula to “lay a lasting and substantial peace-keeping foundation.”

In a report released on Wednesday, Seoul’s Korea Institute for National Unification said that Pyongyang may be becoming more accepting of inter-Korean agreements, while hedging its bets.

The Panmunjom Declaration signed at the April 27 inter-Korean summit states that the two sides will seek three- or four-way peace talks. A three-way talks will involve the two Koreas and the US, and the four-way talks would include China. North Korea, however, had maintained that a peace talks is a matter for discussion with the US.

“From North Korea’s point of view, it is highly likely that a multilateral negotiation was suggested as a mechanism to buffer against uncertainties in US-North Korea negotiations,” the report said.

“It is likely that by stating (participants of the multilateral negotiations to be) signatories of the armistice (North Korea) has China’s participation in mind.”

 

trumpboltonletter.jpg

http://www.koreaherald.com/view.php?ud=20190103000567

A piece of paper? :P

On at least one other occasion, he apparantly kept such Kim love letters with him, having pulled one out of his suit, which was during the G20 summit in Argentina IIRC.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Loading...

×
×
  • Create New...