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I can understand how some might fear a Japan that might be able to say no in the future. In a general sense, there will always be those who prefer to be told what to do in various ways rather than make their own decisions.

There are a number of voices calling for Japan to take a greater leadership role. But the people that say that still don't strike me to be the kind that would take offense at the speech on the carrier.

 

But Japan is limited by physical things that naturally just prevent it from becoming a contending power of similar strength compared to the US or China. Japan has to import almost all of its energy and it has to import over half it's food. One person opined that a population reduction to 80 million is actually not so bad as would reduce dependency on food imports. But to that my thought was a population of 80 million is quite small for a country that wants to increase its ability to influence. If Japan can turn around the low fertility rate and keep the population at 100 million and perhaps turn it around to growth again, then foreign dependency on food and energy increases again.

 

Regardless, If a country the size of Japan tries to create its own strategic and tactical military capabilities that match the US or China, then in the long run, Japan will burn itself out first. Population is just not big enough, and there is just not enough natural resources on the mainland. So a strategy that just accepts that reality and plans for long term well-being with reality in mind is the best way to go. International cooperation is critical. Tomodachi are needed.

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The symbolism of a non-Japanese capital ship based in a Japanese port and protecting Japan and Japanese is offensive enough to those who believe Japan must evolve into a more normal and natural nation.

 

Those who accept disadvantages as realities in Japan are those of the same mindset who opposed the reforms of the Meiji Restoration.

 

Thankfully, throughout history, there have been Japanese patriots and young officers unwilling to do so.

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The symbolism of a non-Japanese capital ship based in a Japanese port and protecting Japan and Japanese is offensive enough to those who believe Japan must evolve into a more normal and natural nation.

 

Those who accept disadvantages as realities in Japan are those of the same mindset who opposed the reforms of the Meiji Restoration.

 

Thankfully, throughout history, there have been Japanese patriots and young officers unwilling to do so.

Well I don't disagree with you during the second half of the 1800s. Or even up to WW1 and into the 1920s. The rules of the world were just different back then. But even that, Japanese weren't always the brutal monsters they are often made out to be in these years. They often did build up good working relations with those in foreign lands like in Taiwan, the Philippines, even Palau, even if more on less on Japan's terms. Even during the Warlord Era in China during the 1920s one of the warlord factions was Japan-backed and came fairly close to winning, but lost a critical battle in 1924 IIRC.

 

I think it was into the 1930s that Japan got too much into an expanionistic fever. Immediate threat to Japan was no longer the same as what it was in the earlier years. The major powers were in a sort anti-war phase. There was little appetite in them to have a major war with a major power. If Japan didn't have Manchuria, thus avoid getting on Chiang Kai-chek's bad side, Japan could have played the Chinese and Soviets against each other in Manchuria. Hold onto to Korea or eventually let it go just as others like Great Britain or France would struggle to hold to some of their places.

 

The northern islands, Taiwan, and various Pacific islands could very well still be part of Japan if Japan didn't isolate itself by quitting the League of Nations. Well, I don't want to continue so much in speculation land. But there very much can be penalty for trying too hard and throwing cooperation out the window, even if it means concessions once in a while such as the Naval treaties made back then.

 

Just in short, I don't disagree with you about Japanese patriots for much of Imperial Japan's history.

 

But I would still say that today's circumstances are again different then what Japan faced from the Black Ships all the way to WW1. I certainly don't disagree with efforts to increase Japan's role and position. There are certainly many areas to increase influence in such as greater military capacity as defense spending is at just 1% right now, and greater exports in the defense industry.

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Japan's regional neighbor is China. And it can't compete militarily likely even now, certainly in the immediate future. Until the PRC economically or politically collapses, Japan can't stand on its own. Period.

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Japan's regional neighbor is China. And it can't compete militarily likely even now, certainly in the immediate future. Until the PRC economically or politically collapses, Japan can't stand on its own. Period.

 

Hypothetically speaking though, suppose the US just disappeared from the scene, went total isolationist or something.. plan B for Japan would be to inject shots of nationalism, push defense spending 3-5 times the current amount, and work with other willing partner countries. Vietnam without a doubt. Taiwan a safe bet as well as the Philippines. And India. Perhaps Australia and New Zealand. Don't want to see plan B, but would get my endorsement if the US had to go out.

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Japan's regional neighbor is China. And it can't compete militarily likely even now, certainly in the immediate future. Until the PRC economically or politically collapses, Japan can't stand on its own. Period.

 

"Now" and "the immediate future" sound like short-term and medium-term approaches to what is in fact a longer-term question for Japan. Whether Japan and Japanese will be content with abnormally limited control over decisions directly affecting the defense of Japan despite Japanese major economic power status remains to be seen.

 

WRT standing on its own, Japan and Japanese have been knocked down before. It would be unwise to underestimate Japan's ability to get back up.

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VinsonAshigara.JPG

170426-N-BL637-175 PHILIPPINE SEA (April 26, 2017) The aircraft carrier USS Carl Vinson (CVN 70), foreground, and the Japan Maritime Self-Defense Force (JMSDF) Atago-class guided-missile destroyer JS Ashigara (DDG 178), left, and the JMSDF Murasame-class destroyer JS Samidare (DD 106) transit the Philippine Sea. The U.S. Navy has patrolled the Indo-Asia-Pacific routinely for more than 70 years promoting regional peace and security. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Sean M. Castellano/Released)

http://www.navy.mil/view_image.asp?id=235812

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ddgs01.JPG

SEA OF JAPAN (April 25, 2017) The Arleigh Burke-class guided-missile destroyer USS Fitzgerald (DDG 62) conducts a bilateral training exercise with the Japanese Maritime Self-Defense Force Kongou class guided-missile destroyer JS Choukai (DDG 176). (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class William McCann/Released)

http://www.navy.mil/view_image.asp?id=235903

 

ddgs02.JPG

SEA OF JAPAN (April 25, 2017) Sailors assigned to the Arleigh Burke-class guided-missile destroyer USS Fitzgerald (DDG 62) conduct a personnel exchange with the Kongou-class guided-missile destroyer JS Choukai (DDG 176) during a bilateral training exercise. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class William McCann/Released)

http://www.navy.mil/view_image.asp?id=235900

 

ddgs03.JPG

SEA OF JAPAN (April 25, 2017) Ensign Kazutaka Sugiyama assigned to the Japanese Maritime Self-Defense Force, rides in a rigid hull inflatable boat during personnel exchange between the Arleigh Burke-class guided-missile destroyer USS Fitzgerald (DDG 62) and the Kongou class guided-missile destroyer JS Choukai (DDG 176). (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class William McCann/Released)

http://www.navy.mil/view_image.asp?id=235902

 

ddgs04.JPG

 

 

SEA OF JAPAN (April 25, 2017) The guided-missile destroyer USS Fitzgerald (DDG 62) conducts a bilateral training exercise with the Japan Maritime Self-Defense Force guided-missile destroyer JS Choukai (DDG 176). Exercises like this enhance information sharing and combined maritime defense capabilities to ensure the U.S. and our allies remain ready to defend the region against any provocations. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class William McCann/Released)

http://www.navy.mil/view_image.asp?id=235810

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More US marines to be relocated out of Okinawa to Guam in mid 2020s

 

WASHINGTON – The United States plans to transfer about 4,000 of 19,000 marines stationed in Okinawa Prefecture to Guam over a period from 2024 to 2028, the head of the U.S. Pacific Command said Wednesday.

 

Adm. Harry Harris told a congressional hearing that “the movement of the bulk of the marines to Guam would occur in the 2024 to 2028 time frame.”

 

Japan and the U.S. agreed in 2013 to start moving marines from Okinawa to Guam in the first half of the 2020s as part of efforts to reduce its footprint on the prefecture, which hosts the bulk of U.S. military bases in Japan.

 

But the transfer is effectively tied to the relocation plan for Marine Corps Air Station Futenma within Okinawa, a contentious project that is supposed to lead to the base’s closure and the return of its land to Japan. The plan is fiercely opposed by residents who want the base moved outside the prefecture.

 

Speaking at the House Committee on Armed Services, Harris said the U.S. also plans to transfer about 3,000 marines to Hawaii from Okinawa.

 

Harris expressed hope that the U.S. military will reduce the number of marines in Okinawa “ultimately” to “a point around 10,000 or 11,000.”

 

“The whole issue of moving marines from Okinawa elsewhere is important to our alliance relationship with Japan,” he said.

 

“Japan has invested a lot in this,” he said. “This is all about — for everyone else’s benefit — reducing the footprint in Okinawa, and also closing Futenma.”

 

Harris said last year that the U.S. expects a two-year delay to 2025 in the plan to move the Futenma base from crowded Ginowan to a less populated coastal area of Nago, given the strong local opposition.

 

Speaking at Wednesday’s hearing, Harris quoted Japanese officials as saying a replacement facility will be ready by Japan’s 2022 fiscal year, but said, “I testified last year that I thought that that was in question.”

 

Okinawa Gov. Takeshi Onaga has demanded that the Futenma base be moved off the prefecture instead of to a replacement facility, the construction of which will lead to the partial landfill of waters off Henoko.

http://www.japantimes.co.jp/news/2017/04/27/national/politics-diplomacy/u-s-start-moving-okinawa-based-marines-guam-2024/

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Two JASDF F-15s carried out joint-training with 2 F-18s from a USS Carl Vinson doing joint-training with the JMSDF on April 28th as what was originally planned for April 26th. Other participating warships were USS Lake Champlain, USS Michael Murphy, USS Wayne E. Meyer, JS Ashigara, and JS Samidare.

 

usjpnair02.jpg

 

usjpnair01.jpg

http://www.mod.go.jp/asdf/news/release/2018/0428/

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Tsai recently said she would not rule out possibility of another phone chat with Trump. Trump was asked about that and if he would have another phone call with Tsai, he replied that he made a good relationship with Xi which is evident by China's cooperation in pressuring North Korea, and he doesn't want to give Xi a problem.

 

 

 

US President Donald Trump on Thursday spurned President Tsai Ing-wen’s (蔡英文) suggestion that the two leaders hold another telephone call, saying he did not want to create problems for Chinese President Xi Jinping (習近平) when Beijing appears to be helping efforts to rein in North Korea.

In a White House interview, Trump brushed aside the idea after Tsai on Thursday told reporters that she would not rule out talking directly to the US president again, an act certain to incense China.

“Look, my problem is I have established a very good personal relationship with President Xi. I really feel that he is doing everything in his power to help us with a big situation,” Trump told reporters, referring to signs that China might be working to head off any new missile or nuclear test by Pyongyang, Beijing’s neighbor and ally.

“So I wouldn’t want to be causing difficulty right now for him,” Trump added. “I think he’s doing an amazing job as a leader and I wouldn’t want to do anything that comes in the way of that. So I would certainly want to speak to him first.”
As US president-elect in early December last year, Trump took a congratulatory telephone call from Tsai. It was the first known contact between a leader of Taiwan and an incumbent or incoming US president in nearly four decades, and Trump cast doubt on Washington’s long-standing policy of acknowledging Beijing’s “one China” principle, which asserts that Taiwan is a part of China.
Trump agreed to honor the US’ “one China” policy in February and then hosted Xi at his Florida resort earlier this month.

Trump’s dismissal of Tsai’s suggestion underscored the importance he is placing on enlisting China’s help in defusing tension with North Korea, which has become his biggest national security challenge since taking office in January, 100 days ago today.

Chinese Ministry of Foreign Affairs spokesman Geng Shuang (耿爽) urged Taiwan to pay attention to the US’ reaction.

“We consistently oppose countries which have diplomatic relations with China having any form of official exchanges with Taiwan,” Geng told a daily news conference yesterday. This position is very clear and very firm.”

Tsai on Thursday said Taiwan’s ties with the US have been improving.
She said Taiwan might need to buy the Lockheed Martin F-35 Lightning II jet, the most advanced stealth warplane in the US arsenal, from its sole arms supplier.

“We don’t rule out any items that would be meaningful to our defense and our defense strategy and the F-35 is one such item,” Tsai said.

However, when told Taiwan’s president had said the nation might want to buy F-35 aircraft, Trump said: “Oh, I haven’t been informed. I’d have to think about that. I’d have to speak to my people about that. They [the Taiwanese government] do buy a lot of equipment from us.”

The Chinese Ministry of National Defense on Thursday said it was resolutely opposed to any country selling arms to Taiwan.

The Global Times, an influential Chinese Communist Party-backed tabloid, called Tsai’s government “a naughty child” in an editorial yesterday and said it would “strongly counter” any move to sell Taiwan advanced fighter jets.

“Each time the Tsai Ing-wen authorities step out of line they will pay the price, like a naughty child in class getting a stern reprimand for shouting out or smashing the glass at school,” it said.

http://www.taipeitimes.com/News/front/archives/2017/04/29/2003669612

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JS Izumo receives JMSDF's first mission to escort US supply vessels under the effects of the new defense legislature. Easy route that stays near Japan, going form one part to another.

 

TOKYO (Kyodo) -- Japan has issued its first order for forces to protect U.S. military vessels since new security legislation was enacted last year, Japanese government sources said Sunday, amid heightened tension on the Korean Peninsula.

Defense Minister Tomomi Inada ordered the dispatch of the Maritime Self-Defense Force helicopter carrier Izumo on Monday to protect a U.S. Navy supply vessel in the Pacific, the sources said.

The United States has sent the Navy's Carl Vinson carrier strike group to waters near the Korean Peninsula, amid signs North Korea could test-fire more missiles or conduct a nuclear test.

North Korea test-fired a ballistic missile Saturday, in defiance of U.N. Security Council resolutions. The U.S. aircraft carrier arrived in the Sea of Japan on the same day and conducted a joint drill with MSDF destroyers and another one with South Korea's navy.

The sources said the Izumo will leave Yokosuka base in Kanagawa, southwest of Tokyo, on Monday morning, and join the supply ship off the Boso Peninsula in Chiba, east of the capital. The vessels will sail to the Shikoku region in western Japan.

It was not immediately known whether the Izumo will guard one or more supply ships.

The supply ship, meanwhile, is expected to refuel other U.S. vessels, currently on standby in waters near Japan for further missile test-firings by Pyongyang, as well as ships sailing with the Carl Vinson.

Guarding other countries' vessels is part of the Self-Defense Forces' expanded responsibilities under the security legislation that came into force in March last year to increase Japan's role in global security. The SDF were previously prevented from protecting allied forces as their use of weapons was restricted to self-defense.

Critics argue that the legislation erodes Japan's postwar pacifist Constitution and may embroil Japanese troops in overseas military actions for the first time since World War II.

http://asia.nikkei.com/Politics-Economy/International-Relations/Japan-issues-1st-order-to-protect-U.S.-ships-amid-N.-Korea-tension

 

Izumo escorting the US supply ship.

Izumo01.jpg

 

Izumo02.jpg

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-4461920/Japan-sends-biggest-warship-protect-supply-ship.html

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Australia and Japan will also participate in Balikatan 2017 with a small dispatch, 80 from Australia, 20 from Japan.

 

MANILA, Philippines — Australian and Japanese military forces will be involved in this year’s Balikatan Exercise, the Philippine military announced Monday, as it holds scaled down drills with its treaty ally, the US.

Lt. Gen. Oscar Lactao, the Philippine side exercise director, said that Australian forces would be involved in some special operations while military personnel from Japan would participate in the humanitarian exercises.

“For the Australian Armed Forces, they will participate in some special operations and bilateral exercises, and for the Japanese it’s more of HADR,” Lactao said.

This year's Balikatan Exercise features drills in humanitarian assistance, disaster relief and counterterrorism, an apparent scale down of the yearly military engagement between the two countries.

Evidence pointing to some strain on the military alliance of the two countries came after it was announced that the two sides would not hold Philippine Amphibious Landing Exercise (PHIBLEX) and Cooperation Afloat Readiness and Training (CARAT) this year.

PHIBLEX participants engage in live-fire events and training for amphibious landing while CARAT is an annual naval exercise of the US with nine other countries including the Philippines.

In a press conference, Lactao admitted that “political authorities” decided on the humanitarian and disaster relief focus of this year’s military exercise.

He said that based on the guidance coming from Philippine political leaders, the focus of this year’s drills should be humanitarian assistance, disaster relief and counterterrorism.

“This exercise scenario is being done by both countries. Of course, we get the guidance from political authorities. So, the political authorities give the guidance to us on the priority at this point in time. The priority according to the president is HADR (humanitarian assistance, disaster relief) and counterterrorism,” Lactao said

The 2017 Balikatan Exercise has 2,800 Filipino soldiers and 2,600 US participants. Eighty military personnel will come from Australia while 20 from Japan will join the drills.

Military contingents from some Southeast Asian countries are observing the bilateral exercise.

http://www.philstar.com/headlines/2017/05/08/1697947/australia-japan-forces-join-balikatan-2017

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After participating in the Singapore international maritime review, JS Izumo, USS Coronado, and JS Sazanami conduct a PASSEX in the SCS.

 

 

 

SOUTH CHINA SEA -- Ships from the U.S Navy and Japan Maritime Self-Defense Force (JMSDF) completed a passing exercise (PASSEX) in the South China Sea, May 18.

The PASSEX included personnel exchanges, cross-deck flight operations, communications exercises, division tactics, a tracking exercise and photo exercise. The bilateral event aimed to enhance interoperability between the two navies and emphasized the importance of communications and coordination while operating together at sea.

“This was another great opportunity for the U.S. Navy to work closely with JMSDF at sea,” said Capt. Alexis Walker, deputy commodore, Destroyer Squadron 7. “Integrating the crews through personnel exchanges allows our sailors to build and strengthen the personal relationships that are the foundation of our naval partnership.”

Ships participating from the JMSDF included the Izumo-class helicopter destroyer JS Izumo (DDH-183), with embarked Escort Flotilla One Command Element, and the Takanami-class destroyer JS Sazanami (DD-113).

“The U.S.-Japan alliance is stronger than it has ever been, and it is growing stronger,” remarked Rear Adm. Yoshihiro Goka, commander, Escort Flotilla One. “Conducting bilateral exercises with U.S. Navy regularly, JS Izumo and JS Sazanami will contribute to regional peace and stability in this Indo-Asia-Pacific region.”

Participating for the U.S. Navy was the littoral combat ship USS Coronado (LCS 4), and her commanding officer, Cmdr. Doug Meagher, talked about the importance of the exercise.

“This PASSEX allowed the Coronado crew to operate and train side-by-side with professional sailors from one of the world’s most capable naval forces,” said Meagher. “Our ships executed flawlessly while operating in close proximity, and that’s a testament to not only the expertise of the U.S. and JMSDF sailors, but also to the strength of our naval partnership.”

Personnel exchanges were conducted through cross-deck helicopter operations utilizing Coronado’s embarked MH-60S and the SH-60K Seahawk onboard Izumo.

The three ships conducted precision maneuvering events and communication exercises while underway, both focused on ensuring the two navies are prepared to work together efficiently in future operations.

“My ship, JS Izumo, the largest ship in the JMSDF, has high capability in support of HA/DR activities in this region,” said Capt. Yoshihiro Kai, commanding officer, JS Izumo. “This bilateral exercise improved our teamwork, tactical skill and readiness.”

“Bilateral exercise like this increased tactical skills and improve response capabilities,” said Cmdr. Hirotaka Okumura, commanding officer, JS Sazanami.

A PASSEX is unique because it allows navies to operate closely and in ways shore exercises do not allow. It further provides the crews with real-life situations to practice their everyday watchstanding and communication skills with foreign vessels.

Prior to the PASSEX the three ships participated in the International Maritime Defense Exhibition (IMDEX) in Singapore. IMDEX is one of the largest maritime exhibitions in the Asia-Pacific region, featuring a trade show and a series of multilateral exercises and exchanges.

On behalf of Commander, Task Force 73, Destroyer Squadron 7 serves as operational commander for littoral combat ships rotationally deployed to 7th Fleet, and conducts advanced planning, organizes resources, and directly supports the execution of maritime engagements such as the Cooperation Afloat Readiness and Training (CARAT) exercise series, the Naval Engagement Activity (NEA) with Vietnam, and the multilateral Southeast Asia Cooperation and Training (SEACAT) exercise with Bangladesh, Cambodia, Brunei, Indonesia, Malaysia, the Philippines, Singapore, and Thailand.

 

 

http://www.pacom.mil/Media/News/News-Article-View/Article/1187907/us-navy-japan-maritime-self-defense-force-conduct-passing-exercise-in-south-chi/

 

US sailors aboard JS Izumo watching their ship, the USS Coronado, maneuver with JS Izumo.

izumocoronado.JPG

http://www.pacom.mil/Media/Photos/igphoto/2001749856/

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USNS Fall River, JS Izumo, and JS Sazanami dock at Cam Ranh Bay for Pacific Partnership 2017.

 

 

One vessel of the U.S. navy and two ships of the Japanese self-defense forces arrived at Cam Ranh Port in south-central Vietnam on Saturday afternoon for activities to accelerate cooperation in the region.

The visit is part of the Pacific Partnership 2017 (PP17), a U.S. Navy-initiated mission to enhance regional coordination in areas such as medical readiness and preparedness for man-made and natural disasters.

The U.S. Navy’s expeditionary fast transport ship USNS Fall River (T-EPF-4) and the Japan Maritime Self-Defense Force’s helicopter destroyer JS Izumo 183 and Takanami-class destroyer JS Sazanami 113 arrived at Cam Ranh for a training agenda revolving around humanitarian and medical aid.

According to Captain Stanfield Chien, PP17 mission commander, this year’s mission in Khanh Hoa Province would include seminars on civil construction projects, professional discussions and disaster response drills.

There would also be coordination in coastal health and marine search and rescue missions.

Naval forces of the three countries will preside over the completion of Hoa Mi and Son Ca kindergartens in Khanh Hoa, and the U.S. Seventh Fleet Band will be performing at local parks and a secondary school as part of the agenda.

The USNS Fall River belongs to the U.S. Military Sealift Command, measuring 103 meters in length with a beam of 28.5 meters and a draft of 3.83 meters.

The ship can reach a maximum speed of 43 nautical miles per hour and is capable of accommodating 312 crew members.

The JS Izumo (DDH-183) is a helicopter destroyer and the lead ship in the Izumo class of the Japan Maritime Self-Defense Force.

The US$1.2 billion ship was launched in 2013 and commissioned in 2015, measuring 282 meters long and 38 meters wide with a loaded displacement of 27,500 metric tons.

The ship can reach 30 nautical miles per hour and is armed with three Phalanx CIWS and two SeaRAM CIWS weapon systems.

The JS Izumo 183 can carry up to 28 aircraft with space for nine helicopters on its deck at any given time, and is capable of conducting anti-submarine as well as humanitarian missions.

Meanwhile, the JS Sazanami (DD-113) measures 151 meters long, 17.4 meters wide and 10.9 meters high, with a draft of 5.3 meters.

The vessel has a standard displacement of 4,650 metric tons and 6,300 when fully loaded, and can carry 175 troops.

The Pacific Partnership 2017 ships had departed the central city of Da Nang on Thursday after completing ten days of disaster response training, medical and engineering expertise exchanges, cooperative health engagements, and community relations events.

https://www.vietnambreakingnews.com/2017/05/us-japan-naval-vessels-visit-vietnams-cam-ranh-port-for-pp17/

 

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pp17o3.jpg

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Taiwan's "Han Guang 33" exercise finished a few days ago.

 

 

 

All three branches of Taiwan’s military yesterday took part in a drill against a simulated attack by China, in the second stage of this year’s Han Kuang series of military exercises, the military said.

During the drill, F-16 jets, which took off from air bases in Hualien and Chiayi, flew a route that simulated an attack by China on Taiwan proper, the military said.

In response, ground forces from the three branches of Taiwan’s military were deployed with the aim of testing the nation’s defense capabilities, the military said.

The exercise was focused on closely monitoring the movements of enemy aircraft and taking defensive action, the military said.

Another exercise was conducted in northern Taiwan, simulating a breach of some major military bases by enemy forces.

The mission of the Taiwanedse units was to take back those bases, the military said.

In addition, a drill was held yesterday afternoon in Kinmen County to test the amphibious warfare capabilities of special forces troops that were assigned to rescue hostages held by enemy forces.

This year’s Han Kuang drills were divided into two parts: Computer-simulated war games that were held from May 1 to May 5, followed by live-fire exercises that are being conducted from Monday through Friday.

The five-day, round-the-clock exercises are aimed at testing the coordinated responses of the three branches of the nation’s military to simulated assaults by the Chinese military.

Two live-fire drills are scheduled to take place tomorrow, including one in Penghu County, that is to simulate an amphibious landing by enemy forces, the Ministry of National Defense said.

President Tsai Ing-wen (蔡英文) is expected to observe the drill in Penghu, the ministry said.

The annual Han Kuang exercises are now in their 33rd year.
They are the nation’s most significant military exercises.

 

 

http://www.taipeitimes.com/News/taiwan/archives/2017/05/24/2003671192

 

 

 

The armed forces yesterday conducted a live-fire exercise in the Penghu islands, concluding the main part of the 33rd annual Han Kuang military exercises, with President Tsai Ing-wen (蔡英文) observing the drill which simulated a landing attempt by China’s People’s Liberation Army (PLA).

The scenario involved a landing by the PLA, with the nation’s armed forces launching an operation to repel the attack.

The Marine Corps acting as PLA troops launched an amphibious assault, with a naval formation of Keelung-class destroyers, a Tuo Chiang-class stealth corvette and Kuang Hua VI fast-attack missile boats providing covering fire.

The air force then launched the first wave of counterattack, with a group of fighter jets firing missiles at target areas at sea, and the army mobilized attack helicopters, tanks and infantry units, and launched an artillery barrage against landing troops.

More than 3,900 soldiers, sailors, airmen and marines participated in the exercise, and weapons and equipment used in the drill included F-16 jets, Indigenous Defense Fighters, AH-64E Apache helicopters, UH-60M Blackhawk helicopters, CH-47 Chinook transport helicopters, RT-2000 multiple launch rocket systems, M60A3 tanks, 155mm and 105mm howitzers, and other light weapons.

Tsai praised the performance of the armed forces, saying the drill was necessary to ensure national safety and the well-being of Taiwanese.

The president reiterated her pledge to build the nation’s defense capabilities with locally developed weapons, including submarines, surface vessels and trainer jets.

The government would raise the nation’s research and manufacturing capabilities to develop necessary weapons, which could boost the local defense sector and the business environment as a whole, Tsai said.

“The most important thing in achieving defensive self-sufficiency is to show the world that Taiwan is determined to defend itself,” Tsai said.

“As the commander-in-chief, I am the most reliable supporter of the armed forces. The government will fully support the military in either reforming national defense or improving the working conditions for military personnel,” she said.

Yesterday was the fourth day of this year’s Han Kuang exercises, the first such event since the Ministry of National Defense changed the nation’s defense strategy from “effective deterrence” to “multi-layered deterrence.”

Although the content shared with the media showed a traditional live-fire drill, there were electronic warfare operations involved, suggesting the military’s awareness to adapt to changes in battle strategies and tactics, Ministry of National Defense spokesman Major General Chen Chung-chi (陳中吉) said.

Today is the last day of this year’s drill, simulating a Chinese attack on the Ching Chuan Kang (清泉崗) air base in Taichung.

The response to the simulated attack is to involve all branches of the armed forces, including fighter jets and surface-to-air missiles.

 

 

http://www.taipeitimes.com/News/front/archives/2017/05/26/2003671303

 

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Two JASDF F-15Js conducted joint training with two US B-1Bs.

 

On the 29th, the Ministry of Defense said that two F-15 fighters of the JASDF conducted joint-training with two B-1B strategic bombers of the USAF in the Kyushu area. It had the aim of keeping in check a North Korea that launched a ballistic missile.

 

After taking off from Guam, the bombers met up with the F-15s from Nyutabara airbase (Miyazaki prefecture, Shintomi-chou) in the airspace in the Kyushu area during AM hours on the 29th. The aircraft flew north during the training in already planned altitude and speed. The training finished by around noon.

 

防衛省は29日、九州周辺で、航空自衛隊の2機のF15戦闘機と米空軍のB1B戦略爆撃機2機が共同訓練を行ったと発表した。弾道ミサイルを発射した北朝鮮をけん制する狙いがある。

 爆撃機はグアムを離陸した後、九州周辺の空域で29日午前に、新田原基地(宮崎県新富町)のF15と合流。事前に計画した高度や速度に基づき飛行する訓練をしながら共に北上した。訓練は、昼ごろ終了したという。 

 

b1f15j.jpg

https://news.nifty.com/article/domestic/government/12145-2017052900921/

Edited by JasonJ
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Two JASDF F-15Js conducted joint training with two US B-1Bs.

 

On the 29th, the Ministry of Defense said that two F-15 fighters of the JASDF conducted joint-training with two B-1B strategic bombers of the USAF in the Kyushu area. It had the aim of keeping in check a North Korea that launched a ballistic missile.

 

After taking off from Guam, the bombers met up with the F-15s from Nyutabara airbase (Miyazaki prefecture, Shintomi-chou) in the airspace in the Kyushu area during AM hours on the 29th. The aircraft flew north during the training in already planned altitude and speed. The training finished by around noon.

 

It mean it was some kind of reconnaissance mission, or just training\show of force?

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Two JASDF F-15Js conducted joint training with two US B-1Bs.

 

On the 29th, the Ministry of Defense said that two F-15 fighters of the JASDF conducted joint-training with two B-1B strategic bombers of the USAF in the Kyushu area. It had the aim of keeping in check a North Korea that launched a ballistic missile.

 

After taking off from Guam, the bombers met up with the F-15s from Nyutabara airbase (Miyazaki prefecture, Shintomi-chou) in the airspace in the Kyushu area during AM hours on the 29th. The aircraft flew north during the training in already planned altitude and speed. The training finished by around noon.

 

It mean it was some kind of reconnaissance mission, or just training\show of force?

 

 

usjpn3.jpg

 

usjpn4.jpg

 

usjpn2.jpg

 

usjpn1.jpg

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