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37 minutes ago, DB said:

The EMA had no more or less data than was available to the UK, so the only reason for a difference in timing is because one set of experts made a decision and the other did not. the UK authorities insist that there were no shortcuts, because they were using exactly the same data made available to the everyone.

Make of *that* what you will - I choose to consider that the EMA is spinning this narrative like a top to avoid criticism of their unwillingness to make a decision, but then that's what happens when committees get large - decision time is at least  directly proportional to the number of members, and may even scale exponentially.

There was nothing preventing any of the member states from taking the leap and serving their citizens' needs rather than waiting for the turgid bureaucracy to find its rubber stamp under the Christmas tree.

As I said, the story is told differently in my part of the world were Brexit is not really an issue. 

I know, of course, that such a narrative is unacceptable to Brexiteers no matter what. 🙂

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48 minutes ago, DB said:

The EMA had no more or less data than was available to the UK, so the only reason for a difference in timing is because one set of experts made a decision and the other did not. the UK authorities insist that there were no shortcuts, because they were using exactly the same data made available to the everyone.

Make of *that* what you will - I choose to consider that the EMA is spinning this narrative like a top to avoid criticism of their unwillingness to make a decision, but then that's what happens when committees get large - decision time is at least  directly proportional to the number of members, and may even scale exponentially.

There was nothing preventing any of the member states from taking the leap and serving their citizens' needs rather than waiting for the turgid bureaucracy to find its rubber stamp under the Christmas tree.

Well, it did have more data, specifically, 3 weeks of vaccination in the UK to make sure the vaccines don't make people into zombies controlled by Bill Gates, because "28 days later" may have been a documentary...

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If you think the Chinese are staging out of Blighty, you are sadly misled. In the way that India is very much a creation of the British, it is India that will fuel the idea of Britain. 

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7 hours ago, Simon Tan said:

If you think the Chinese are staging out of Blighty, you are sadly misled. In the way that India is very much a creation of the British, it is India that will fuel the idea of Britain. 

Sorry, that is a bit too obscure (deep?) for me. Please explain.

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Date 02.01.2021

Author Bernd Riegert

Brexit: The view from the French side of the Channel

For truck drivers, Brexit is causing some annoying new problems. But the chaos that was feared on the day following the UK's final exit from the EU did not transpire, as Bernd Riegert reports from Calais.

As the first ferry from the United Kingdom docked in the port of Dunkirk in northern France at noon on Wednesday, the French customs officers gathered on a set of steps at the quayside and watched the first trucks rolling off.

Normally, they work in their offices, looking at computer screens and checking freight documents. But Friday was different, or even historic, because the trade deal with the former EU member state had gone into force at midnight Central European Time (2300 GMT Thursday). The previous single market has been replaced by an agreement that in principle allows the duty-free movement of goods between the UK and the EU, but at the price of more checks and paperwork than before.

"By far most truck drivers have the right customs declarations ready," said Filip Hermann, the vice president of DFDS, one of the biggest shipping companies in northern Europe. "And we try to help those without all the papers while they're in Britain, because they aren't allowed to board our ships at all."

But he said that many smaller trucking companies and subcontractors in eastern Europe still had many questions about the new freight documents required after Brexit.

Calm before the storm?

But the whole customs clearance process went very calmly overall. The New Year's Day holiday meant that not much was happening anyway, and the pandemic had greatly reduced the number of passengers. What is more, only about 10% of the 120 trucks coming out of the ferry were being pulled over for additional customs checks. But France might raise this quota at any time.

"The real test will come in a few weeks when the amount of goods increases and the trucking companies are working at full capacity," Hermann said. He said that things were fairly quiet now, but that the last weeks before Christmas had been very busy because a lot of warehouses and factories had wanted to stock up before Brexit was finalized.

In nearby Calais, the top customs officer for the Haut-de-France region, Jean-Michel Thillier, was monitoring the smooth progress of the new checks that he had helped prepare for years, as he says. The customs service carried out large-scale practice drills and invested in new data processing methods. Companies can declare their goods and pay customs duties online under a system called "smart border." The drivers receive a barcode that then only has to be read at the border.

The UK and France carry out joint checks of papers, even on each other's territory. "We have worked hard and hired 60 new people to create a new customs administration that is open around the clock. We have installed new computer technology and hope that this system functions automatically to some extent so that clearance times are kept short," said Thillier, dressed in his elegant dress uniform for the on-site visit in Calais.

On the British side, they are taking their time. According to the rules of the new trade deal, the UK customs authority intend to check goods coming from the EU only in the middle of this year.

Thillier declined to comment on whether British preparations are being undertaken in a serious spirit. "It is not my place to judge the decision by the British people, but we have to prepare for this new world. And this new world means that there have to be customs formalities when goods are moved from one side to the other."

Sensitive chains of supply

What is new are the checks on animals, plants and fresh foodstuffs. In the single market, they could be transported without obstacles. Now, they have to undergo controls. In all, 5 million trucks and semitrailers cross the Channel in both directions each year. The UK imports 70% of the fresh foodstuffs being transported.

An interruption of just two or three days in the supply chain could lead to empty shelves in British supermarkets. "The COVID travel ban on trucks before Christmas showed what damage France could unleash if checks really led to delays," DFDS's Hermann pointed out.

[...]

https://www.dw.com/en/brexit-the-view-from-the-french-side-of-the-channel/a-56116985

 

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Spain says it will have last word on Gibraltar border entries

Agreement in principle will allow territory to join the Schengen free movement area

Ashifa Kassam in Madrid

Sat 2 Jan 2021 15.18 GMT Last modified on Sat 2 Jan 2021 15.39 GMT

Spain will have the last word on who can enter Gibraltar under the terms of the preliminary post-Brexit deal announced this week, Spain’s foreign minister has said, in an assertion that was swiftly challenged by Gibraltar’s chief minister.

The agreement in principle – struck just hours before Gibraltar was poised to become the only frontier marked by a hard Brexit – will allow the British overseas territory to join the Schengen free movement area with Spain acting as a guarantor.

Gibraltar’s port and airport would become the external borders of the Schengen area, with checks undertaken by the EU’s Frontex border agency for an initial period of four years.

“Schengen is a set of rules, procedures and tools, including its database, to which only Spain has access. Gibraltar and the United Kingdom do not,” Arancha González Laya told Spanish newspaper El País in an interview published on Saturday. “That is why the final decision on who enters the Schengen area belongs to Spain.”

When pressed on whether this would entail the presence of Spanish customs or police in Gibraltar – a point that had proved to be a significant sticking point in the negotiations – González Laya said further details would be made public after she informed Spain’s parliament on the deal in the coming days. “Evidently, there must be a Spanish presence to carry out the minimum tasks of Schengen control,” she said.

The government of Gibraltar did not immediately respond to a request for comment. But on Saturday, responding to an article published by a rightwing Spanish newspaper, Fabian Picardo, the territory’s chief minister tweeted: “Under the New Year’s Eve agreement only Gibraltar will decide who enters Gibraltar and Spanish officers will not exercise any controls in Gibraltar at the airport or port now or in four years’ time. This is our land. Couldn’t be clearer.”

[...]

https://www.theguardian.com/world/2021/jan/02/spain-gibraltar-border-preliminary-post-brexit-deal

 

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Brexit: First goods cross Irish Sea trade border

By John Campbell
BBC News NI Economics & Business Editor

Published 1 day ago

The first goods have crossed the new trade border between Northern Ireland and the rest of the UK.

The 'Irish Sea border' is a consequence of Brexit and means that most commercial goods entering NI from GB require a customs declaration.

About a dozen lorries arrived on a ferry from Cairnryan in Scotland to Belfast at 14:00 GMT on Friday.

They were met by officials, with some vehicles directed to new border control posts.

Many food products from GB now have to enter NI through these border posts where they can be inspected by the Department of Agriculture.

These products also need health certificates, though some of the new certification processes will be phased in over the next three months.

The UK government also announced a three-month "grace period" for parcels, meaning those sent by online retailers will be exempt from customs declarations until at least April.

It said the grace period was necessary to avoid disruption to deliveries at a time when many shops are closed due to pandemic restrictions.

Meanwhile the secretary of state for Northern Ireland has continued to insist the new range of checks, controls and paperwork is not actually a sea border.

Brandon Lewis tweeted: "There is no 'Irish Sea Border'. As we have seen today, the important preparations the government and businesses have taken to prepare for the end of the Transition Period are keeping goods flowing freely around the country, including between GB and NI."

Stockpiling

Transport companies are not expecting significant volumes of freight over the next few days.

There has been significant stockpiling ahead of the changes and it may take one or two weeks before freight volumes are at normal seasonal levels.

Some businesses, particularly haulage companies, are anxious about the new IT systems which are necessary for the border to function.

They have had less than two weeks to familiarise themselves with the new systems.

Seamus Leheny from Logistics UK said: "With any reconfiguration of supply chains and new systems there will be teething problems and we expect that."

There will be no new processes or checks for the vast majority of goods leaving NI for GB.

[...]

https://www.bbc.com/news/uk-northern-ireland-55498775

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Next time people tell you there's no new friction at the borders because of Brexit, you can show them this Dutch TV clip of drivers being stopped and having their lunches confiscated. (It is forbidden to enter with meat and dairy products to the EU)

 

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Naturally there needs to be a Dutch sandwich shop just the other side of the harbor immigration control point. I take it this is at a Dutch ferry point?

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Ironically, initial adverse effects of Brexit seem to have materialized mostly in Northern Ireland which remains in the Single Market, though the below article suggests it will eventually kinda sort out. There's also a clearly sensationalist CNN report which spreads doom and gloom for the wider UK economy, but that probably needs to be revisited in a couple months, too.

Quote

Brexit: Can Irish Sea border ‘teething problems’ be solved?

By John Campbell
BBC News NI Economics & Business Editor

Published 1 day ago

As Joe Biden was being inaugurated on Wednesday members, of the UK's shadow cabinet were hosting a less happy gathering.

Rachel Reeves, the shadow cabinet office minister, was chairing a meeting of Northern Ireland haulage firms.

Each of them had a story about the difficulties they are facing with the new Irish Sea border.

Since New Year's Eve, getting goods across that border has involved a range of new processes and documentation.

The first speaker was Chris Slowey, managing director of Manfreight.

He told of underprepared customers, inexperienced customs agents and clunky systems.

Mr Slowey moves goods for major global brands and said they have a dim view of what is happening.

"Those global brands believe Northern Ireland and Ireland are bad places to do business at the moment because of the additional costs."

He said that while Northern Ireland's supermarkets are still well stocked, in future consumers can expect higher prices and reduced choice.

Earlier Mr Slowey told politicians at Stormont that he was going to have to put up his prices.

The major reason was that while he had full loads going out of Northern Ireland, many of his trailers were coming back empty, as some GB firms have reduced their trade into NI.

"We have done our figures for the first 20 days of January and we're going to have to go to our customer base and ask them for a 12% rise on the current rate structure," he said.

Commercially sustainable?

Haulage firms are clamouring for financial help, grace periods and easements which they say are needed to make the new border arrangements commercially sustainable.

They are not the only ones.

In the last week, a major UK health food firm warned that shipping organic food from GB to Ireland is now "virtually impossible at scale".

The horticulture industry said that new plant health processes required as a result of the sea border were causing "incredible frustration".

The standard response of the UK government has been that trade is mostly flowing normally from GB to NI and that teething problems can be overcome.

And it is the case that some difficulties have been solved.

This week HMRC was able to remedy an anomaly that meant NI businesses importing steel were facing tariffs of 25%.

Problems with the transport of mixed loads of food, known as groupage, are also being tackled with a successful test run from Liverpool to Belfast last week.

A VAT issue for the second-hand car trade has also been resolved.

But UK ministers and officials know there is more to do.

More effort is now being directed at educating GB businesses, many of which have been woefully underprepared for the new trade rules with NI.

There is also work looking at what more can be done to help hauliers, but the government is very wary of raising expectations.

The new EU-UK joint bodies which are managing the deal should begin their work in earnest next month.

It is possible that they can find easements for some of the trickiest customs issues relating to Northern Ireland goods moving in and out of Dublin port.

The government is also pointing to some signs of confidence in parts of the Northern Ireland economy.

Two major manufacturers, Wrightbus and Terex, announced job creation plans this week.

Friction

One of the potential upsides of Northern Ireland's Brexit deal is that, unlike other parts of the UK, manufacturers will retain frictionless access to the EU's single market.

The inward investment agency Invest NI is already quietly talking about this but the message may be more forcefully pushed later this year.

But frictionless trade from GB to NI is not coming back.

There are no more set-piece negotiations which will allow that to happen.

That is likely to lead to changes in patterns of trade with businesses seeking out new suppliers in the Republic of Ireland or the wider EU.

That was emphasised to me by Steve Tomkins, one of the GB organic food wholesalers who is now having difficulties selling to NI.

He said: "Were I based in Dublin I would be making every effort to establish a market in the north."

https://www.bbc.com/news/uk-northern-ireland-55772522

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Britain’s Boris Johnson presses Biden for new trade deal

By AAMER MADHANI today

WASHINGTON (AP) — British Prime Minister Boris Johnson made clear to President Joe Biden on Saturday that he’s eager to forge a new U.S.-U.K. trade deal.

The push for a new deal came in a broad-ranging call between the two leaders that touched on the global response to the coronavirus pandemic as well as the Biden administration announcing this week that the U.S. would rejoin the Paris climate accord and the World Health Organization, according to a statement from Downing Street.

A new trade agreement between the allies is a higher priority for Johnson than it is for Biden. The U.K. regained control over its national trade policy at the start of the month following the end of a post-Brexit transition period.

White House press secretary Jen Psaki said Friday that the administration had no timeline for forging a new trade deal as Biden’s attention is largely focused on getting the coronavirus pandemic under control and pressing Congress to pass the president’s $1.9 trillion coronavirus relief plan.

Janet Yellen, Biden’s Treasury secretary nominee, also signaled during her confirmation hearing earlier this week that Biden wasn’t eager to negotiate new trade deals.

“President Biden has been clear that he will not sign any new free trade agreements before the U.S. makes major investments in American workers and our infrastructure,” Yellen said.

Downing Street said Saturday that Biden and Johnson discussed “the benefits of a potential free trade deal between our two countries,” and Johnson “reiterated his intention to resolve existing trade issues as soon as possible.”

The White House in its own statement said that the two leaders spoke about combating climate change, containing COVID-19, and ensuring global health security as well as shared foreign policy priorities in China, Iran and Russia. But the statement notably made no mention of discussion on trade.

The call with Johnson was at least Biden’s third call with a foreign counterpart since Friday. The president spoke with Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau and Mexican President Andrés Manuel López Obrador on Friday evening.

https://apnews.com/article/joe-biden-global-trade-health-coronavirus-pandemic-jen-psaki-332faf002eb52c7db6429704b7c8ff9b

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Apparently, any foreign company that wants to send mail order goods to Britain at a value of less than 137 GBP per shipment now needs to set up a British VAT account to have the VAT reimbursed.

As a consequence, eSim Games will stop shipping material goods to our British customers (you can still have time-based licenses, though). And I bet a lot of other companies will also want to avoid the hassle. It's a very small example, but if it's happening with enough companies it's going to reduce choice for the British consumer.

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I said I would never post on this ghastly thread again, for which I hope I will be forgiven. But anyway...

Personal observation, I have recently gotten back into model making, and got on board the Vallejo and Ammo effects bandwagon. Well before I would order some paint from Amazon, and it was about 2 or 3 pounds delivery, and be here in a few days. Ive recently ordered soem paint and its now somewhere between 6 or 7 pounds delivery depending on where it came from, and its taken in some cases up to 2 weeks to arrive. From China its pretty much as it was, Europe seems very slow.

Company on our local news, its largely a warehouse, acting as a go between China and Europe. Import export like. Because of the delay getting the products into Europe from the UK, they decided to buy up a warehouse in Europe, and all the trade goes directly there, and the British Government misses out on the taxation.

 

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Date 31.01.2021

UK to apply to join trans-Pacific free trade bloc

After its exit from the EU, the United Kingdom is seeking to be part of the Pacific free trade area. A formal request will be made early next week, the government said.

The United Kingdom is applying to join the Comprehensive and Progressive Trans-Pacific Partnership (CPTPP), a trans-Pacific trading bloc of 11 countries, the government announced on Saturday.

"One year after our departure from the EU we are forging new partnerships that will bring enormous economic benefits for the people of Britain," Prime Minister Boris Johnson said in a statement.

"Applying to be the first new country to join the CPTPP demonstrates our ambition to do business on the best terms with our friends and partners all over the world and be an enthusiastic champion of global free trade," he added.

By joining the Pacific free trade area, the UK stands to benefit from lower tariffs without deep political integration, as was the case with the European Union.

Substantial trade

The UK's trade with CPTPP members accounted for nearly 111 billion pounds (about $152 billion, €125 billion) in 2019, which is around six times less than the business the UK conducts with the EU.

London said joining the partnership would remove tariffs on 95% of goods traded between members, which include Japan, New Zealand and fast-growing economies like Mexico, Malaysia and Vietnam.

UK's International Trade Secretary Liz Truss will make the formal request when she speaks to officials in Japan and New Zealand on Monday. Negotiations are expected to begin later this year.

Launched in 2019, the CPTPP removes trade barriers among the 11 nations in the Asia-Pacific region. While the United States was one of the biggest proponents of the pact under former President Barack Obama, the Trump administration withdrew from the partnership before it was ratified in 2017.

https://www.dw.com/en/uk-to-apply-to-join-trans-pacific-free-trade-bloc/a-56394536

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Inspectors pulled from Brexit checks at Northern Ireland ports over threats

Staff withdrawn as Protestant gangs brand them ‘targets.’

BY SHAWN POGATCHNIK

February 2, 2021 10:13 am

DUBLIN — The anti-Catholic extremists who once terrorized Northern Ireland’s streets are casting an intimidating shadow over the unsettled Brexit trade deal.

Council staff running EU food and animal health checks on goods arriving from Britain were withdrawn indefinitely from duty overnight at the Port of Larne north of Belfast. The reason? Paramilitary outlaws in the overwhelmingly Protestant town have branded them traitors worthy of assault or worse.

Their bigger target is the Northern Ireland protocol that has shifted EU-U.K. customs checks away from the land border with the Republic of Ireland and into Northern Ireland’s four major ports.

While that move reduced the risks of reviving Irish Republican Army attacks against border installations, it has heightened tensions in militant Protestant circles, where the protocol — which has raised regulatory barriers on everything from Scottish seed potatoes to British Army equipment — is seen as a threat to the unity of the United Kingdom.

Those operating the newly opened Border Control Post at the Port of Larne, including a dozen environmental health officers, appealed for protection after experiencing verbal taunts and threatening graffiti. One reads, “All border post staff are targets.”

The local 40-member council voted Monday night to withdraw its staff from potential harm until better security arrangements could be established.

The Police Service of Northern Ireland said it was taking the threats – initially relayed by union representatives to council members – seriously and has boosted patrols in the Larne area in response. “The safety of staff working at points of entry is of utmost importance to us,” said Assistant Chief Constable Mark McEwan, who is meeting officials from the Larne and Belfast ports, councils, food safety agency and agriculture department Tuesday afternoon.

In Dublin, Prime Minister Micheál Martin condemned what he called “the intimidatory tactics against workers, who should of course be allowed to go about their daily work,” warning of “a very sinister and ugly development.”

In Belfast, security staff at the customs post directed arriving trucks to an alternative, undisclosed location Tuesday. 

Speaking at a European Commission press briefing Tuesday, Commission spokesman Eric Mamer condemned “very strongly any threat of violence against port officials,” and said EU officials working alongside their Northern Irish counterparts had also been asked “not to attend their duties today.” Mamer added: “We will continue to monitor the situation and adapt accordingly.”

Some port staff have reported seeing strangers at the port entrance that they believe are recording the license plates of the port workers’ parked cars – a piece of intelligence typically used by militants to target people at their homes. “People are now fearful that information is being gathered about them which would be personal and may identify where they live,” said Democratic Unionist lawmaker Sammy Wilson.

[...] 

https://www.politico.eu/article/inspectors-brexit-eu-uk-checks-northern-ireland-ports-threats/

Edited by BansheeOne
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Damn that Brexit....the UK has greater vaccination rates than the EU does...
 

 

Edited by rmgill
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5 hours ago, rmgill said:

Damn that Brexit....the UK has greater vaccination rates than the EU does...
 

 

And way more dead. Let's not forget that!

 

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Diet apparently had an impact on Covid severity. Supposedly fermented foods like cabbage and yogurt have a positive effect. 

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6 hours ago, Mistral said:

And way more dead. Let's not forget that!

 

Don't forget, Belgium leads  in Death rate. You'd think Brussels would have a handle on that. 

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7 hours ago, Adam Peter said:

It is easy if you adopt Russian safety standards.

Russia approved emergency use of a vaccine before they'd commenced Phase 3 trials (as did China). The UK approved their vaccine after the conclusions of those trials were published.

Let us not also forget that although the EMA decided that Crhistmas break was more important than saving lives, they did also approve use of the AstraZeneca vaccine without any caveats - those are all imposed at national level.

Given that there is sufficient PfizerBioNtech vaccine available to cover the affected age groups, it's an easy political score with no immediate consequences to direct those to the older age group.

Meanwhile, the evidence to rebut the UK's decision pours in... Oh, no, the other thing.

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9 hours ago, Adam Peter said:

It is easy if you adopt Russian safety standards.

Patently false if the difference was proceeding with review after a holiday and In roughly the same time. Disingenuous of you to even suggest. 
 

And with the EU approving the use of the Russian Sputnik vaccine for distribution in the EU, your point is doubly fatuous. Didn't the EU effectively adopt Russian standards? English man bad is it? 

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34 minutes ago, BansheeOne said:

Okay, at this point I just have to ask - what's all this nonsense about holidays delaying approvals? 

The US, UK, Canada and other countries were done with approval at the beginning of December. The EU was was expected to finish their approvals at the end of December. That seems to hinge upon waiting until after the Christmas holiday. 

What's the real reason? EU Technocrat bureaucratic efficiency? 

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I just don't see any evidence for that at all. BioNTech/Pfizer was approved by the UK 12/8, the US 12/11, the EU 12/21, all ahead of the holidays. Moderna, US 12/18, EU 1/6, UK 1/8; if there was any holiday hangup, it affected both the EU and UK. AstraZeneca, UK 12/30, EU 1/29, US "probably not before April"; that's way too much spread to be explained by the holiday season, particularly for the US. 

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2 hours ago, BansheeOne said:

I just don't see any evidence for that at all. BioNTech/Pfizer was approved by the UK 12/8, the US 12/11, the EU 12/21, all ahead of the holidays. Moderna, US 12/18, EU 1/6, UK 1/8; if there was any holiday hangup, it affected both the EU and UK. AstraZeneca, UK 12/30, EU 1/29, US "probably not before April"; that's way too much spread to be explained by the holiday season, particularly for the US. 

Ok, so if there's such a close spread, why do folks like Adam Peter make comments about Russian Safety? If it's not too late or delayed, then it's also not that much earlier then either then is it?

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7 hours ago, DB said:

Russia approved emergency use of a vaccine before they'd commenced Phase 3 trials (as did China). The UK approved their vaccine after the conclusions of those trials were published.

Not at all, remember, the 8% elderly effective debate stems from the underdocumentation and undertesting.

Quote

The government has formally requested the UK’s independent medicines regulator assess the suitability of Oxford/AstraZeneca’s COVID-19 vaccine for temporary supply, as soon as the company submits the necessary safety, quality and efficacy data.

...

Earlier this week, the University of Oxford and AstraZeneca published their interim efficacy results, which indicated the vaccine was at least 70% effective in protecting individuals from COVID-19.

Source

5 hours ago, rmgill said:

And with the EU approving the use of the Russian Sputnik vaccine for distribution in the EU, your point is doubly fatuous. Didn't the EU effectively adopt Russian standards? English man bad is it? 

No, the EU is not approving Sputnik-V. It is on a list (on the other hand, it is on the list of AstraZeneca, as they say mixing the vaxxes yields better results), first review of docs expected in February.

Hungary approved it, following Our Dear Leader's Wish. Despite the fact that the sci approval is a more serious state secret, than anything NATO related (as usual in our failed democracy), the independent profs revolted, and leaked that there are problems in the docs, including proof that the production is same as the test, missing measure of vaxx in the containers, missing toxicity tests.

Pro, that the Russians are sane so they would allow license production. Con, that China failed the same as test test.

1 hour ago, rmgill said:

Ok, so if there's such a close spread, why do folks like Adam Peter make comments about Russian Safety? If it's not too late or delayed, then it's also not that much earlier then either then is it?

I am sure you have read the mistakes AstraZeneca made during the trials, it is not an accident that it is delayed in the USA, where the limit of responsibility is the starry sky.

On the other hand, despite that both vaxx has tempoary license, less than stellar documentation and experiment history (And AZ has some skeleton in the cabinet like the neurological illnesses experienced, Pfizer too, who knows the others?), in Hungary it is a political weapon as the opposition, financed by the US deep state, beats the Russians head into the issues while silent about the same problems with the products of the Advanced Western Democracies.

 

Whoa, it was more than a hour to assemble this, as a non-English speaking person. Including five minutes of close quarter combat with the CMS to wedge some space between the quotes from the UK government and from rmgill. I don't want to state my position anymore. My personal vaxx preference is Moderna - AstraZeneca, then Sputnik, then the rest but no Chinese now, please.

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