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Not really, Id argue British nationalists have been much of the problem, ie, Brexit without any kind of plan. It just takes practical, common sense to get the country out of the hole its dug itself. And regrettably, we keep voting for people without an ounce of any.

What would I do? Id tax the banks to the hilt, and give them tax breaks on any loan they invest in within the UK. Anything to stop them prefering making their money abroad. Id set up a national business bank with the money, have that directed to ONLY loan to businesses manufacturing or working in the UK. And Id set up a technical college, and replicate your Caltech, so we actually have a chance of get on board the present industrial revolution. Preferably somewhere like Bletchley, where they have an example of a previous British technical lead on their doorstep.

All that takes an intervention into the economy, and some foresight. Good luck with finding politicians that are up for that.

 

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6 hours ago, DB said:

If we have a trade deal with Japan and not the EU, then I suppose we'll see more Lexus on the roads and fewer Mercedes. The reliability will improve, of course.

Word. ūüėĀ

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Looks like you need some good old British Nationalism. 

MBGA... :)

what they need is new MG MGB and MGA, to make british cars great again

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Bought up by and production moved to China something like a decade ago. Instead of making sportscar's, they now make the worst kind of corporate bland you can imagine.

https://mg.co.uk/

On the positive side, Triumph new seems to go from strength to strength. Although its notable that at least half their production is made in the far east.

 

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You're such a bundle of positive energy and hopefulness. 

If you had a modern Dunkirk today, "Would  you be running around screaming all is lost we have no hope. Just surrender the the Germans. They want to be our friends!"

 

8 hours ago, Stuart Galbraith said:

Not really, Id argue British nationalists have been much of the problem, ie, Brexit without any kind of plan. It just takes practical, common sense to get the country out of the hole its dug itself. And regrettably, we keep voting for people without an ounce of any.

You can actually have something if a plan if it involves escaping from something, but you can also wing your way through things by the seat of your pants. You need trade deals, start making trade deals.

8 hours ago, Stuart Galbraith said:

 

What would I do? Id tax the banks to the hilt, and give them tax breaks on any loan they invest in within the UK. Anything to stop them prefering making their money abroad. Id set up a national business bank with the money, have that directed to ONLY loan to businesses manufacturing or working in the UK. And Id set up a technical college, and replicate your Caltech, so we actually have a chance of get on board the present industrial revolution. Preferably somewhere like Bletchley, where they have an example of a previous British technical lead on their doorstep.

Taxing the banks to the hilt is like the short term goal of stripping money from the burgher class. You make enemies later and cause added problems. 

And yes, you do need to spend more time investing tech points. Cut out the fluff, focus on the advancement.  

 

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Ryan, either you want reality as I see it, in which case I'm happy to help, or you want fantasy, in which case I can't help you. There is a reason I don't hang out in the tankovia threads. I see nothing to be optimistic about, knowing the calibre of the men making the decisions.

Re Dunkirk, Churchills greatest address was not keep calm and carry on, it was blood, sweat and tears. He was telling the nation things were bad, going to get much worse and a lot  people were going to die. That's the kind of leader I want, not someone like Boris selling a fools paradise. At least you know what the truth is.

Worst I see it, our banks go to Paris. I strongly doubt the yellowjacket's will tolerate half the nonsense from them as we do. 

 

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23 hours ago, Stuart Galbraith said:

Ford in the UK have already largely bailed to Europe. The British car industry increasingly means to the high value end, so I think the impact of Japanese cars being imported is likely to be no different from all the Ford ones we get from the continent.

Agree WRT the impact of the FTA from a UK manufacturing perspective. 

From a Corolla versus Fiesta perspective, the UK market is just another battleground. One in which Ford has been eating very well, it must be admitted.

The FTA represents an opportunity to piss in Ford's cornflakes, so to speak. It should be taken advantage of.

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Britain exiled from the EU, and Canada buying new warships, missiles, even handguns. Y'all gonna become part of the Greater Canadian Co-Prosperity Sphere if I'm not mistaken.

Out: soccer, cricket, and ruggers

In: hockey, baseball, and 65x110 football*

 

* I just realized that Canadian football field dimensions look like an autocannon cartridge. Geez those Canucks are warlike...

 

 

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Is it exile if you left of your own accord?

We have been having some success in selling ship designs and missiles recently. Both to the Canadians, ship design only to the Australians and missiles to NZ. It's almost as if we share a common bond, or maybe we just managed to build a product that was useful outside of the narrow interests of the RN.

On the broader front, the removal of the EU as the arbiter of foreign economic policy might allow the UK to improve relations with the Commonwealth states in general and Canada, Aus and NZ in particular. We can but hope, given how we've ignored them for far too long.

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Date 20.11.2020

'Better progress, more movement' in last-gasp Brexit talks: EU's von der Leyen says

European Commission President Ursula von der Leyen says three main difficult issues remain, over governance, fisheries and competition rules. The two sides now have just a few weeks to avoid a no-deal scenario.

The president of the European Commission Ursula von der Leyen on Friday hailed better progress in recent talks on a post-Brexit trade deal, but added that there was more work to be done.

"After difficult weeks with very, very slow progress, now we've seen in the last days better progress, more movement on important files. This is good," she said, before warning that "nothing is agreed until everything is agreed."

"We still have, of course, the three main difficult issues: governance, fisheries and the level playing field. But, within the frame of the level playing field, for example, progress has been made on the question of state aid," von der Leyen said in Brussels.

She added that the team is "engaged and working tirelessly day and night to indeed reach the natural deadline ... by the end of the year."

'Tangible progress'

A senior EU official confirmed to DW that there had "tangible progress" in recent days and that the gaps between both sides were 'slowly shrinking' on the main sticking points.

Another EU diplomat from a country with a huge fishing industry said it was now down to British Prime Minister Boris Johnson to make the "necessary political choices" to seal a deal.

A UK government spokesperson declined to comment on von der Leyen's remarks, saying only that "progress had been made" in the latest round of negotiations. 

New regulator mooted

Earlier Friday, Reuters cited UK sources who work on state aid as saying that Britain had offered to set up a regulator for corporate subsidies, something the EU has long asked for. 

The news agency cited an EU diplomat confirming that Britain had made a proposal but said it fell short of the bloc's demand for a body independent of government and with a clear mandate.

Britain and the EU have been engaged in eight months of tense negotiations to work out a new trading relationship following the UK's departure from the political institutions of the bloc at the end of January.

During the so-called "transition period" expiring at year's end, formally leaving the EU has had almost no impact on other ties.

The talks have failed to make much headway in recent months on the key issues of fishing rights, business regulations and state aid, among others. Several deadlines have come and gone.

[...]

Any agreement struck must still be approved by all the EU countries, as well as the European Parliament, to come into effect, which is likely to take at least 4 weeks.

With most deadlines missed, France, Belgium and the Netherlands have asked Brussels to update emergency plans in case of a 'no deal' scenario.

https://www.dw.com/en/better-progress-more-movement-in-last-gasp-brexit-talks-eus-von-der-leyen-says/a-55676038

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