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Astronomical Stargazer Thread


Panzermann

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5 minutes ago, Ssnake said:

 I'm wasting enough of my time watching Deep Sky Videos on YouTube.

Watch out for those rabbit holes :)

I've watched a bunch of their videos too.  Sometimes I'll look for one of their videos on a target I'm imaging.  Good stuff.

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Posted Images

NASA scientists:

Researchers were especially interested in the X-ray thread G0.17-0.41, which, according to Wang, "reveals a new phenomenon."

"This is evidence of an ongoing magnetic field reconnection event." The thread, writes Wang, probably represents "only the tip of the reconnection iceberg."

 

Dr. Becky on Deep Sky videos:

Yeah, whenever astronomers see something that we can't really explain, we tend to invoke "magnetism".

😄

 

 

 

OMG. We have italicized emojis!

Unnatural. Disgusting.😁😱

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57 minutes ago, Ssnake said:

OMG. We have italicized emojis!

Unnatural. Disgusting.😁😱

Well, we use italicization to indicate words or phrases in a foreign language. So why not emojis?

English laughter; 😄

German laughter; 😶

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23 hours ago, Ssnake said:

Dr Becky on Deep Sky videos:

Yeah, whenever astronomers see something that we can't really explain, we tend to invoke "magnetism".

😄

 

This is like archaeologists: everything they don't have a clue about is a ritual object.

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4 hours ago, Ssnake said:

Oh, come on. You just downscaled that Hubble image.

That is a scurrilous accusation. He rented that time on Hubble, fair and square.

 

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With the approach I've been using, without a tracker, a 5 hour exposure would mean stacking 36000 images and would take me a month of clear viewing to achieve - and you're got a total of about 12-13 hours total for all three channels!

With the cloud cover here, I think it would take me over a year to get enough shots for that image, even if I had the equipment.

And that's not even mentioning the vast amounts of street lighting glow everywhere within about 30 miles of here.

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14 hours ago, Ssnake said:

Oh, come on. You just downscaled that Hubble image.

 

10 hours ago, Ivanhoe said:

That is a scurrilous accusation. He rented that time on Hubble, fair and square.

 

 

LOL

 

Thanks for the compliments :)

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8 hours ago, DB said:

With the approach I've been using, without a tracker, a 5 hour exposure would mean stacking 36000 images and would take me a month of clear viewing to achieve - and you're got a total of about 12-13 hours total for all three channels!

With the cloud cover here, I think it would take me over a year to get enough shots for that image, even if I had the equipment.

And that's not even mentioning the vast amounts of street lighting glow everywhere within about 30 miles of here.

 

There's actually a good number of amateur astrophotographers in the UK and I started in LP that's worse than Hertfordshire :)

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According to this site:

https://www.nightblight.cpre.org.uk/maps/

I'm in an area with 8-16 units (who uses nanowatts per sq. cm per steradian as a unit anyway?)  but within walking distance of an area that is only 0.5-1, so there is considerable scope for improvement.

It simply needs a clear night that doesn't have a working day to follow to try it. Oh, and no moon.

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Quote

Andromeda in a Single Shot
June 25, 2021

How far can you see? The Andromeda Galaxy, 2.5 million light years away, is the most distant object easily seen by the unaided eye. Other denizens of the night sky, like stars, clusters, and nebulae, are typically hundreds to thousands of light-years distant. That's far beyond the Solar System but well within our own Milky Way Galaxy.

Also known as M31, the external galaxy poses directly above a chimney in this well-planned deep night skyscape from an old mine in southern Portugal. The image was captured in a single exposure tracking the sky, so the foreground is slightly blurred by the camera's motion while Andromeda itself looms large. The galaxy's brighter central region, normally all that's visible to the naked-eye, can be seen extending to spiral arms with fainter outer reaches spanning over 4 full moons across the sky. Of course in only 5 billion years or so, the stars of Andromeda could span the entire night sky as the Andromeda Galaxy merges with the Milky Way.

https://apod.nasa.gov/apod/ap210625.html

AndromedaGalaxy-SingleShotMina-4688-net1

Edited by sunday
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A few of my recent images..

The Crescent Nebula:

 

EpGNYnc6SWtO_16536x0_b9muqi8S.jpg

 

Rho Ophiuchu

f_US96pB3F5H_16536x0_b9muqi8S.jpg

 

Pickerings Triangle.. part of the "Cygnus loop"

 

1U7ak56uJCzm_16536x0_b9muqi8S.jpg

 

The Elephant trunk nebula

 

vrEnkBzaCwC4_16536x0_b9muqi8S.jpg

 

And lastly, the Pelican nebula

nF1jAezm9-Dh_16536x0_b9muqi8S.jpg

 

Every shot except Rho Ophiuchu was taken with narrowband filters. 

 

Cheers!

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I'm envious and awestruck about the capabilities of contemporary "amateur" stellar photography, but not envious enough to change my lifestyle and set up observation sites of my own. Rather, I'm going to steal them for my wallpaper collection, as usual.

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I am set to receive my iOptron CEM26 telescope mount! It's already at the US warehouse. I'll have it shipped next week. It'll arrive sometime first half of September hopefully.

 

I pre-ordered it on 31 December 2020 and after more than six months delay it is finally coming. :D

 

So excited!!!!!!

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