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Health Quackery Roundup


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It amazes me that the body can just want ONE particular thing and steer your behavior toward it.

Salt comes to mind.

I've been thinking that I don't have such cravings.

 

Then I remembered: dark chocolate.

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Odd one I heard of last night. Newborns are not to receive water only untill 6 months old.

Weird. My mom runs a daycare out of her home, has done it for years, and actually keeps up with the latest research and such. After reading this I was almost positive I've seen her give babies younger than that water. Then some google-fu showed this seems to be the prevailing wisdom and the more I think about it she sometimes doesn't get kids till they're almost 6 mo and frankly I couldn't tell the age of a baby if my life depended on it.

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One of the weirdest things I saw was when I got right out of the Army. I rented a room from an old friend and right before I moved out they had their first kid. I remember his wife froze excess breast milk and donated it to a charity. It seemed a bit... odd but I recall her saying how much better it was for newborns than formula. One of Stargrunt6's videos commented on this as well mentioning how so many of those formulas are loaded with sugar and you end up with really unhealthy babies as a result (and that horrible start really screws them over for life). :blink:

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One of the weirdest things I saw was when I got right out of the Army. I rented a room from an old friend and right before I moved out they had their first kid. I remember his wife froze excess breast milk and donated it to a charity. It seemed a bit... odd but I recall her saying how much better it was for newborns than formula. One of Stargrunt6's videos commented on this as well mentioning how so many of those formulas are loaded with sugar and you end up with really unhealthy babies as a result (and that horrible start really screws them over for life). :blink:

 

Most low-fat things at the supermarket are really reduced-fat/increased-sugar.

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One part in the "Ominous Octet" of type 2 diabetes pathophysiology is the effects of hyperglycemia on the brain. In short, it hampers satiety, which is why diabetics eat more.

 

Link to one groundbreaking article.

 

Does the above imply that maybe the endocrinal impact of diabetes leads to obesity, rather than v.v.?

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One of the weirdest things I saw was when I got right out of the Army. I rented a room from an old friend and right before I moved out they had their first kid. I remember his wife froze excess breast milk and donated it to a charity. It seemed a bit... odd but I recall her saying how much better it was for newborns than formula. One of Stargrunt6's videos commented on this as well mentioning how so many of those formulas are loaded with sugar and you end up with really unhealthy babies as a result (and that horrible start really screws them over for life). :blink:

 

Most low-fat things at the supermarket are really reduced-fat/increased-sugar.

 

 

Yep they decrease the fat. so they add sugar to help it taste good, among other reasons they add sugar to those products.

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Odd one I heard of last night. Newborns are not to receive water only untill 6 months old.

Weird. My mom runs a daycare out of her home, has done it for years, and actually keeps up with the latest research and such. After reading this I was almost positive I've seen her give babies younger than that water. Then some google-fu showed this seems to be the prevailing wisdom and the more I think about it she sometimes doesn't get kids till they're almost 6 mo and frankly I couldn't tell the age of a baby if my life depended on it.

 

I did some reading when I saw this, basically to much water upsets their electrolyte and way to much water could basically poison them. However normal amount will not hurt them, but generally babies up to that stage need breast milk/formula, as their body is growing very quickly. Water may reduce their intake, but hey that's all you got, give it to them in reasonable amounts.

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I most probably poisoned myself with water once. During a walk of 100 km (I dnf after 90) over 24 hour I had a "strategy" which consisted of lots of water since warm outside. I drank between 18-20 liters.

Unfortunately I did not have the knowledge I now have, so between fluid in/out and intake of electrolytes there was an inbalance.

After 90 km I went to take a dump. Ended up cramping and much other discomfort on toilet-floor for about 40 minutes.

At least I had brain enough to go to infirmary when I could stand again.

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One part in the "Ominous Octet" of type 2 diabetes pathophysiology is the effects of hyperglycemia on the brain. In short, it hampers satiety, which is why diabetics eat more.

 

Link to one groundbreaking article.

 

Does the above imply that maybe the endocrinal impact of diabetes leads to obesity, rather than v.v.?

 

 

Pathology of many diseases happen to be vicious cycles, and this is just one example. Diabetes doesn't cause obesity, but it makes it easier to sustain.

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http://www.marketwatch.com/story/the-paleo-diet-has-it-wrong-cavemen-did-eat-carbs-2015-08-18

 

“Eating meat may have kick-started the evolution of bigger brains, but cooked starchy foods together with more salivary amylase genes made us smarter still,” the study concluded.

 

The study says that to truly eat Paleo, starch and higher levels of carbohydrates are necessary. It explains that the human brain uses about a quarter of the body’s energy budget and about 60% of blood glucose — energy needs that wouldn't have been met on a low-carbohydrate diet. Additional glucose was necessary for pregnancy and lactation. The study also found evidence that the genes that code for the enzymes needed to digest starch evolved about 1 million years ago, in the midst of the Paleolithic era, further suggesting a diet that included significant levels of starch.

 

I'm not seeing the causality between the claims that Paleo man had a low-carb intake, and the claim that a low-carb diet leads to low blood glucose and lesser brain function. Isn't the liver capable of converting both proteins and fatty acids into glucose as needed?

 

Also, having the starch-digesting enzymes enables effective use of starch intake, but is it necessary and sufficient proof that all Paleo diets did include significant levels of starch? Seems like piss-poor logic to me.

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Also, it occurs to me that we keep viewing paleo man as a modern 18th century man without electricity. But my understanding is that most Stone-Age cultures were pretty low-energy cultures. Hunter-gatherers aren't out there sweating in the fields 12 hours a day. They are going for the low-hanging fruit, literally. Shellfish, meat that can be trapped, wild fruit, tubers, etc. Such a lifestyle wouldn't require 4 kcal a day...

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Guest Jason L

Also, it occurs to me that we keep viewing paleo man as a modern 18th century man without electricity. But my understanding is that most Stone-Age cultures were pretty low-energy cultures. Hunter-gatherers aren't out there sweating in the fields 12 hours a day. They are going for the low-hanging fruit, literally. Shellfish, meat that can be trapped, wild fruit, tubers, etc. Such a lifestyle wouldn't require 4 kcal a day...

 

It's actually widely accepted that humans took a big hit with the whole agriculture thing. Hunter gatherers spent less time working for food, and had better nutrition that farmers for a considerable stretch of history.

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When I see comments extolling vegan/vegetarianism, I like to ask how many successful vegan cultures/civilizations have there been?

If it were so great, the human race would have gone vegan long ago.

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Also, fun-fact: only one group of people can benefit from fructose and that's marathon runners. Probably because no fat cell is safe at the 10 mile mark.

Nope. I remember pouring fruit juice down my throat when I ran out of blood sugar in the second half of a 200 km bike ride, & it was exactly what I needed. It's damned good for those moments, & they're easier to reach when cycling than when running.

Edited by swerve
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One of the weirdest things I saw was when I got right out of the Army. I rented a room from an old friend and right before I moved out they had their first kid. I remember his wife froze excess breast milk and donated it to a charity. It seemed a bit... odd but I recall her saying how much better it was for newborns than formula. One of Stargrunt6's videos commented on this as well mentioning how so many of those formulas are loaded with sugar and you end up with really unhealthy babies as a result (and that horrible start really screws them over for life). :blink:

In some countries there are state-run breast milk banks.

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One of the weirdest things I saw was when I got right out of the Army. I rented a room from an old friend and right before I moved out they had their first kid. I remember his wife froze excess breast milk and donated it to a charity. It seemed a bit... odd but I recall her saying how much better it was for newborns than formula. One of Stargrunt6's videos commented on this as well mentioning how so many of those formulas are loaded with sugar and you end up with really unhealthy babies as a result (and that horrible start really screws them over for life). :blink:

In some countries there are state-run breast milk banks.

 

 

How does one make a withdraw.....for science?

 

 

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One of the weirdest things I saw was when I got right out of the Army. I rented a room from an old friend and right before I moved out they had their first kid. I remember his wife froze excess breast milk and donated it to a charity. It seemed a bit... odd but I recall her saying how much better it was for newborns than formula. One of Stargrunt6's videos commented on this as well mentioning how so many of those formulas are loaded with sugar and you end up with really unhealthy babies as a result (and that horrible start really screws them over for life). :blink:

In some countries there are state-run breast milk banks.

 

 

"Here at TankNet's Loving Hands Breast Milk Center, we. . . "

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http://www.marketwatch.com/story/the-paleo-diet-has-it-wrong-cavemen-did-eat-carbs-2015-08-18

 

“Eating meat may have kick-started the evolution of bigger brains, but cooked starchy foods together with more salivary amylase genes made us smarter still,” the study concluded.

 

The study says that to truly eat Paleo, starch and higher levels of carbohydrates are necessary. It explains that the human brain uses about a quarter of the body’s energy budget and about 60% of blood glucose — energy needs that wouldn't have been met on a low-carbohydrate diet. Additional glucose was necessary for pregnancy and lactation. The study also found evidence that the genes that code for the enzymes needed to digest starch evolved about 1 million years ago, in the midst of the Paleolithic era, further suggesting a diet that included significant levels of starch.

 

I'm not seeing the causality between the claims that Paleo man had a low-carb intake, and the claim that a low-carb diet leads to low blood glucose and lesser brain function. Isn't the liver capable of converting both proteins and fatty acids into glucose as needed?

 

Also, having the starch-digesting enzymes enables effective use of starch intake, but is it necessary and sufficient proof that all Paleo diets did include significant levels of starch? Seems like piss-poor logic to me.

 

Then there's that whole long gut of ours that's not a very short one. I just spoke with one of our ivy league trained dieticians today at work, and she said meat should only be eaten no more than four times a month (yeah, I break that every day).

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http://www.marketwatch.com/story/the-paleo-diet-has-it-wrong-cavemen-did-eat-carbs-2015-08-18

 

“Eating meat may have kick-started the evolution of bigger brains, but cooked starchy foods together with more salivary amylase genes made us smarter still,” the study concluded.

 

The study says that to truly eat Paleo, starch and higher levels of carbohydrates are necessary. It explains that the human brain uses about a quarter of the body’s energy budget and about 60% of blood glucose — energy needs that wouldn't have been met on a low-carbohydrate diet. Additional glucose was necessary for pregnancy and lactation. The study also found evidence that the genes that code for the enzymes needed to digest starch evolved about 1 million years ago, in the midst of the Paleolithic era, further suggesting a diet that included significant levels of starch.

 

I'm not seeing the causality between the claims that Paleo man had a low-carb intake, and the claim that a low-carb diet leads to low blood glucose and lesser brain function. Isn't the liver capable of converting both proteins and fatty acids into glucose as needed?

 

Also, having the starch-digesting enzymes enables effective use of starch intake, but is it necessary and sufficient proof that all Paleo diets did include significant levels of starch? Seems like piss-poor logic to me.

 

Then there's that whole long gut of ours that's not a very short one. I just spoke with one of our ivy

 

 

Also, fun-fact: only one group of people can benefit from fructose and that's marathon runners. Probably because no fat cell is safe at the 10 mile mark.

Nope. I remember pouring fruit juice down my throat when I ran out of blood sugar in the second half of a 200 km bike ride, & it was exactly what I needed. It's damned good for those moments, & they're easier to reach when cycling than when running.

 

 

The "n" value of your research equals "1." And a 200km bike ride isn't that far removed from a 26mile run anyway, so it kind of makes the point. I'm just quoting Dr. Lustig.

league trained dieticians today at work, and she said meat should only be eaten no more than four times a month (yeah, I break that every day).

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