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https://twitter.com/realDonaldTrump/status/1096980408401625088

 

 

The United States is asking Britain, France, Germany and other European allies to take back over 800 ISIS fighters that we captured in Syria and put them on trial. The Caliphate is ready to fall. The alternative is not a good one in that we will be forced to release them........

 

...and the proof of they were ours, not owned by his KSA masters?

 

https://twitter.com/realDonaldTrump/status/1096982979107278850

 

 

....The U.S. does not want to watch as these ISIS fighters permeate Europe, which is where they are expected to go. We do so much, and spend so much - Time for others to step up and do the job that they are so capable of doing. We are pulling back after 100% Caliphate victory!

 

Is bold text a Freudian slip?

 

Look, who is not happy to have a jihadist at home?

 

Hoda Muthana not a U.S. citizen, says Secretary of State Mike Pompeo

 

Was she an alien without consequences for 20 years, growing up on services paid by the local taxpayers?

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Trump's threat to unleash those IS fighters upon Europe is just his usual bullshitting about a call that's not his to make anyway. Because they're not in US custody in the first place rather than of Kurdish forces. You know, the ones he is throwing under the Turkish bus with his withdrawal plans.

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........ now Soviet veterans are mostly in good relations with former Mujahedin fighters who consider them "good enemy" compared to Western forces who are "bad enemy". It was lucky coincidence. Western involvements in Iraq, Afghanistan and, now, Syria are lacking clear objective to reach.

What do you mean western bad enemy?

It is not me, it is Afghans themselves - there is a lot of interviews with former Mujahedin fighters and ordinary Afghans who are saying more or less the same - "Russians" (Soviets) were not entering female part of the house (sometimes even when knowing person they are looking for is there), not stepping on holy places with boots, officers consulting with village elders, soldiers drinking tea with locals, forces constructing factories and housing for locals and so on. Also complains about random drone strikes (tribal chief in one of videos below is saying "They claim this strikes are precise - but what use in it when they strike elders fathering or wedding ceremony?") It is quite logical as USSR in Afghanistan was following the same Russian Empire\early USSR tactics that transformed Soviet Central Asia into more or less civilized place, plus cultural gap between Soviet conscript from poor village (or even "aul" in Tajikistan mountains) was relatively narrow, they were literally both living somewhere in XIX century ("Russians are simple peasants, like us") , while modern Western servicemen is separated from local Afghan villager by centuries of evolution (not evolution is not always positive thing - it is just changes)

Interviews in Russian

 

Another former Mujahedin opinion in English

Is it possible this interviews do not representing whole population? May be. No way to find out without some kind of syrvey....

 

I see you have posted obsolete information. Two of the videos are almost 5 years old. The third is almost 10 years old. US drone doctrine was changed since then. Drones are launching smaller missiles that cause less collateral damage. Some drones carry missiles that have no warhead and cause no collateral damage. Targeting has been turned over Afghan authorities so blame for collateral damage is on Kabul not USA.

https://www.thebureauinvestigates.com/drone-war/data/afghanistan-reported-us-covert-actions-2019

https://www.thebureauinvestigates.com/stories/2019-02-08/cia-backed-afghan-unit-atrocities

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Western involvement in those wars do not lack clear objectives.

War in Iraq was about replacing Saddam with a stable elected government.

Saddam is long gone....

Policy goal there is to keep stable government from being replaced dictatorship of ISIL or Iran.

In Syria it is about preventing Erdogan from mass murdering Kurds.

 

You mean NATO invaded Syria to save local Kurds from another NATO member country?

 

Yes.

Afghanistan is about forcing Taliban to respect results of elections.

 

What elections you mean?

What do you mean by "What you mean?"? Afghanistan has regular local and national elections. Taliban considers elections to violate Islam.

https://www.reuters.com/article/us-afghanistan-election-taliban/afghan-taliban-issue-fresh-call-to-boycott-foreign-plot-of-elections-idUSKCN1MS1JK

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Afghanistan is about forcing Taliban to respect results of elections.

 

What elections you mean?

What do you mean by "What you mean?"? Afghanistan has regular local and national elections. Taliban considers elections to violate Islam.

https://www.reuters.com/article/us-afghanistan-election-taliban/afghan-taliban-issue-fresh-call-to-boycott-foreign-plot-of-elections-idUSKCN1MS1JK

 

In what way elections in October, 2018 were the reason of US troops moving into Afghanistan 17 years earlier? People born under US occupation are now entering voting age....

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Western involvement in those wars do not lack clear objectives.

War in Iraq was about replacing Saddam with a stable elected government.

Saddam is long gone....

Policy goal there is to keep stable government from being replaced dictatorship of ISIL or Iran.

 

 

 

Why not establish stable Gov in Italy first? Many countries on the planet are quite unstable in terms of Gov, and some countries are controlled by other countries.....

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Where did that take place? Iraq or Syria?

"Footage released by #Iranian @arabicfarsnews showing that Iranian electronic warfare units managed to Intercept the broadcast of @usairforce UAVs above #Iraq and #Syria, also showing the forced landing of a MQ-9 Reaper due technical error, and destroying it later by US air force" https://twitter.com/Mansourtalk/status/1098631893799657472

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President Gerald Ford pardoned Japanese-American U.S citizen Iva Toguri aka Tokyo Rose in 1977 after her return to the United States and subsequent conviction for treason in 1949.

 

Either Muthana was a citizen of the United States prior to her joining ISIS or she wasn't. There is no grey area here. If she was, she deserves her day in court, and deserves to at least make the prosecution force key witnesses to lie if they can't get a conviction otherwise, the same way Toguri did.

Edited by Nobu
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Not sure this really belongs here; between the ousting of the Algerian and Sudanese president respectively, it might warrant a dedicated North Africa or Arab Spring Mk. II thread.

 

Sudan’s Omar al-Bashir is ousted by military after 30 years in power

 

By Muhammed Osman and Max Bearak
April 11 at 12:23 PM

KHARTOUM, Sudan — Sudan’s president was deposed Thursday the same way he came to power 30 years ago — in a military takeover.

 

Omar Hassan al-Bashir’s downfall, however, did not come with the flying bullets or middle-of-the-night escapes many expected from a leader who survived numerous past crises. Instead, the biggest peaceful demonstrations in a generation precipitated his ouster, though the hundreds of thousands of protesters gathered in Khartoum received the announcement of new military leadership Thursday with a mixture of disappointment and disbelief.

 

Sudan’s defense minister, Awad Ibn Auf, declared on state radio the takeover of a two-year transition government administered by the military with him in charge, adding that the constitution would be suspended, a three-month state of emergency would be put in place and a curfew imposed.

 

Sudan’s state media reported that all political prisoners, including leaders of the protests, were in the process of being released from jails around the country. But protesters were angered that their demands for a civilian government were not met and vowed not to let the curfew end their massive sit-in in the capital, Khartoum.

 

“Did we go through all this trouble for this?” asked Khalid Osman, a protester at the demonstration Thursday. “It’s the same story.”

The protests were sparked in December by price hikes on basic goods but also reflected a deep-rooted desire for the replacement of Bashir’s regime. Bashir is accused of committing crimes against humanity and genocide in Sudan’s Darfur region and has been indicted by the International Criminal Court.

 

Hundreds of thousands of Sudanese spent this week in Khartoum’s streets, singing, dancing and waving banners imprinted with hopeful slogans calling for the rebuilding of their country. The protests were initially organized by the Sudanese Professionals Association, a group that drew many doctors, lawyers and students.

 

The protesters’ demands included Bashir’s prosecution and justice for protesters who had been killed. But many said Thursday that their hope was transformed into anger by Ibn Auf’s speech.

 

Ibn Auf was a key military leader during Bashir’s suppression of rebels in Darfur and is unlikely to give Bashir up for prosecution. The U.S. government also imposed sanctions against him in 2007 for his role in Darfur.

 

“They just replaced one thief with another,” said Ahmad Ibrahim, a young protester sitting on the ground under the sweltering heat near the sit-in outside of the army headquarters. “We are going to keep pushing until all of our demands are met.” His friends nodded in agreement.

 

The Sudanese Professionals Association rejected what it called “a coup to reproduce the faces and institutions that our great people revolted against.”

 

“Hold the squares and the roads that we liberated by force and courage until the handover of authority to a civilian transitional government that expresses the forces of the revolution,” it wrote on Twitter. “The ones who destroyed the country and killed its people are trying to steal every drop of blood and sweat that our great people shed in the revolution that has shaken the throne of tyranny.”

 

[...]

 

Bashir’s departure capped a season of protest and political churn in North Africa that recalled the 2011 Arab Spring uprisings that forced autocratic leaders out of power in Tunisia, Egypt, Libya and Yemen. In Algeria, protests that started in February aimed at preventing its ailing president, Abdelaziz Bouteflika, from seeking another term in office ended up removing North Africa’s longest-serving leader.

 

But amid the euphoria in Algeria and Sudan, demonstrators have appeared more keenly aware of the looming dangers than their counterparts eight years earlier, vowing to remain in the streets until their broad array of demands were met.

 

The example of Egypt had provided a particularly dire warning. After the fall of Hosni Mubarak, a rocky, two-year transition resulted in a military coup led by Egypt’s current president, Abdel Fatah al-Sissi, and a government more repressive than any in the country’s recent history.

 

Egypt appeared supportive of Bashir’s ouster Thursday. The two countries had tense relations in recent years because of a border dispute and Sudan’s support for an Ethiopian dam project that Egypt opposes. An Egyptian foreign ministry statement Thursday pledged Cairo’s “full support for the brotherly choices of the Sudanese people and their free will to shape the future.”

 

https://www.washingtonpost.com/world/africa/sudans-military-expected-to-announce-overthrow-of-president-following-months-of-popular-protests/2019/04/11/bedcc28e-5c2b-11e9-842d-7d3ed7eb3957_story.html?utm_term=.25346326d054

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Apparently it is reported that KSA shoot down its own CH-4 drone purchased from China with a patriot missile.

ch41.jpg

Seven more images in the spoiler

 

ch42.jpg

 

ch43.jpg

 

ch44.jpg

 

ch45.jpg

 

ch46.jpg

 

ch47.jpg

 

ch48.jpg

 

https://defence-blog.com/news/saudi-led-coalition-reportedly-shoots-down-its-own-drone.html

https://www.weibo.com/5940474579/Hpi3tFM3E?from=page_1005055940474579_profile&wvr=6&mod=weibotime&type=comment#_rnd1555591629615

 

On note of the CH-4, apparently Houthi shot a Saudi CH-4 in last year in August.

https://defence-blog.com/news/saudi-ch-4b-armed-uav-shot-down-by-houthi-rebels-in-yemen.html

 

And in December.

https://nthnews.net/en/yemennews/breaking-news-yemens-air-defenses-shoot-down-saudi-led-ch4-drone-over-saadah-videoimages/

 

An article dated March 26th, 2017 about a PRC company that makes the CH-4 taking steps to build a factory in KSA that makes drones.

https://www.scmp.com/news/china/diplomacy-defence/article/2081869/chinese-drone-factory-saudi-arabia-first-middle-east

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Trump invokes emergency provision to OK Saudi, UAE arms sales

 

 

May 24 (UPI) -- President Donald Trump used emergency authority to approve nearly two dozen arms sales to Saudi Arabia, United Arab Emirates and other countries, Secretary of State Mike Pompeo told Congress on Friday.

Congressional aides told The Washington Post the deals are worth about $8 billion and include the sale of mortar bombs, missiles, drones, repair and maintenance services, and precision-guided munitions.

 

Operation Huawei 2

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