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At least by local traffic laws, car vs tram is always fault of car.

Edited by bojan
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I think in most countries it is almost always seen as fault of the car driver, unless tram runs against stop lights etc. It's not like tram could evade car easily if on rails... :P

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11 hours ago, Tim the Tank Nut said:

I am so never visiting you!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

 

several of those tram drivers had no reaction at all when they hit the cars...

Waht do you mean? they stopped! if it were me I would keep going...

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I was raised in Mexico. There are two very simple (unofficial) rules regarding right of way:

  • If it's bigger, it has the right of way. Period.
  • If approximately the same size, the one who arrives first goes first.

--

Leo

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27 minutes ago, Leo Niehorster said:

I was raised in Mexico. There are two very simple (unofficial) rules regarding right of way:

  • If it's bigger, it has the right of way. Period.
  • If approximately the same size, the one who arrives first goes first.

--

Leo

Also the cheapest car rule: if the opponent is driving a cheaper car than yours, let him pass.

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  • 2 weeks later...

First Nazi goats, now blue dogs.

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Russia's stray dogs with bright-coloured fur - pictures

Published 3 days ago

First there were bright blue stray dogs, then bright green ones. Russia is trying to solve the mystery of these dogs, which appeared in industrial areas hundreds of miles apart.

Seven dogs with blue fur were found roaming near a derelict glass factory in Dzerzhinsk, an industrial city near Nizhny Novgorod, 370km (230 miles) east of Moscow. The pictures went viral after local media reported the strange pack of dogs on 11 February.

The factory had been producing acrylic glass and prussic acid. It is suspected that the dogs rolled around in powdered blue dye at the plant.

On 13 February the dogs were brought to a vets' clinic in Nizhny Novgorod, where blood and faeces samples were taken. Traces of Prussian blue dye were found in their fur.

Russian media report that the dogs appear healthy and are eating well. But there are still concerns that a toxic chemical, such as copper sulphate, might have caused the colour change.

On Thursday several dogs with bright green fur were seen roaming around Podolsk, an industrial town 37km (23 miles) south of Moscow. In this case, according to a Moscow regional minister, the dogs were seen near an abandoned warehouse, where sacks of powdered green paint had been stored.

 

But some Russians on social media suspect the Podolsk dogs might have been deliberately painted for a sick joke, as the bright blue dogs had impressed so many people earlier.

[...]

https://www.bbc.com/news/world-europe-56129464

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Alexander Nevsky or Felix Dzerzhinsky? Decisions, decisions.

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Date 27.02.2021

Moscow mayor scraps vote on statue for Soviet secret police chief

Residents of the Russian capital have failed to agree on whether to build a statue for a saint or a statue of a Soviet-era secret police chief.

The mayor of Moscow, Sergei Sobyanin, said on Friday he was scrapping a plan to build a new statue in one of the city's central squares after a poll failed to give a clear decision on who should be honored.

City authorities had asked residents to vote on two candidates from Russian history for a statue to be placed in Lubyanka Square — including the reinstatement of the statue of the much-feared founder of the Soviet Union's first secret police, a precursor to the KGB.

The mayor dropped his plan after neither figure received a decisive number of votes.

"The statues which stand on streets and squares should not divide society, but unite it," Sobyanin wrote on his blog. "Hence I consider it correct to abandon this process and leave Lubyanka Square as it is."

Muscovites fail to reach an agreement

The poll was held online and voting started on Thursday morning. By Friday morning, around 55% of voters had chosen a statue of the 13th-century prince and saint of the Russian Orthodox Church Alexander Nevsky. Another 45% had opted instead for Felix Dzerzhinsky, the Soviet revolutionary and a key figure in the so-called "Red Terror."

[...]

https://www.dw.com/en/moscow-mayor-scraps-vote-on-statue-for-soviet-secret-police-chief/a-56721563

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Varies by state. In general, results of municipal administrations asking citizens's opinions on local projects are non-binding anyway. For referendums initiated by citizens, a simple majority suffices, but minimum turnout must be between eight and 30 percent.

There was the saga of the fringe Marxist-Leninist Party of Germany erecting a Lenin statue at their national HQ in Gelsenkirchen, NRW last year. The city refused to grant a construction permit, but was defeated in court since it was on non-public property. So they resorted to installing a critical exhibition on communism at Castle Horst opposite the site. In 2018, China gifted a statue of Karl Marx to his birthplace of Trier for his 200th birthday. There was debate in the city council whether to accept it, and demonstrations for and against it when it was inaugurated, but AFAIK no referendums initiated either by the administration or citizens. Similar for the Chinese gift of an Engels statue to his birthplace of Wuppertal in 2010; the city just demanded that it wasn't put on a pedestal.

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IIRC there is a street named after Lenin in Paris. Some other notable Soviet communist also, but I forgot which one...

Edited by bojan
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Oh, I'm just four blocks (and my office one) from Karl-Marx-Allee where the DDR used to hold its military parades (in violation of Berlin's four-power status), but I think putting a statue of Erich Mielke in front of the former Stasi headquarters (now a museum) would be a bit much even for a city where NVA veterans paraded at the Soviet war memorial at Treptower Park in their old uniforms on 9 May back in 2013; charges for violating the ban on uniformed demonstrations were eventually abated.

Then again if you gave Berliners a choice between a statue of Reinhard Heydrich and Saint Bonifatius at the former Gestapo headquarters, I half-suspect they would vote mostly for the former just out of the city's traditional anti-religious sentiment ...

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