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shep854

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2 hours ago, DB said:

This wouldn't happen in the US because everyone points a gun at anyone who dares to knock on the front door. Assuming they don't just out-and-out shoot them for stepping on the path.

 

They have to.  Police are too busy killing Negroes to bother protecting other citizens.

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One of my favourite youtube channels is "My Self Reliance". For those not familiar with it, it's an ongoing ASMR-like channel that shows a man building a log cabin largely solo and by hand, interspersed with some outstanding sequences of views of the Canadian back country, all leavened by playing retrieve with a really nice dog.

Anyway, in his most recent video he expresses concern for the future of his type of presentation on youtube due to bill C-11 currently making its way through the Canadian political process.

The video description includes this letter from Youtube:

Quote

Jeanette Patell

Head of Canada Government Affairs & Public Policy, YouTube

What is Bill C-11?

The Online Streaming Act (Bill C-11) is designed to expand Canada’s current Broadcasting Act, to support the creation, promotion and discoverability of Canadian creative content (CanCon) in the digital age. The Bill would give extensive new powers to The Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission (CRTC), a government regulator, to decide how content is presented to Canadian viewers on platforms like YouTube, and require platforms to make financial contributions to produce CanCon.

Where does YouTube stand on the Bill? Right now, Canadians are in the driver's seat of their YouTube experience. They come to learn, to be inspired and to build their businesses. Our goal is to keep it that way, rather than putting the government regulator in between viewers and creators, deciding what gets pushed forward and what does not, and ultimately who wins and who loses. These are decisions that could deeply impact our Canadian creators and how they earn a living on the platform.

How will Bill C-11 impact Digital Creators?

Based on the Bill’s current language, the CRTC would have the authority to:

* Determine how content appears on the platform, including the YouTube homepage and “watch next” section1

* Apply CanCon rules requiring creators to prove that each individual video that they upload meets the complex legal definition of what is “Canadian enough” to qualify. This means more time and resource allocation for smaller creators, and gives an advantage to large Canadian media companies who have the resources to do so * Require artificial promotion of some creators over others based on CRTC priorities, which could impact how content reaches global audiences and hurt viewership and revenue

* Regulate the amount of time and type of advertising on creators’ channels, limiting their abilities to earn advertising revenue

How will Bill C-11 impact Canadian Viewers?

When you come to YouTube today, our system sorts through billions of videos to recommend content tailored to your specific interests, like how to play the violin, or watch hockey highlights. Bill C-11 puts that approach at risk. Instead of seeing content on your homepage that’s based on your interests, Bill C-11 would give the CRTC the authority to shape what content is presented for you.

And this is worrisome for creators as well. Recommending videos to the wrong audience could drive the ‘click through rate’ on any creator video to zero. If we are forced to “promote” videos that are not relevant to viewers’ needs, it could massively backfire, and lead to fewer recommendations, and decreasing revenues for creators.

Won’t promoting Canadian creators help small channels grow?

If videos are being recommended simply because they qualify as ‘CanCon’ and not because the viewer has shown an interest in that content, there’s a strong chance it won’t be a good fit. When that happens, we know viewers respond with negative inputs like skip, dislikes, or even leave the video all together. Creators count on us to get the match between content and viewers right. And negative viewer signals have a ripple effect across our global recommendations systems - this feedback is interpreted as a sign that the content is either low quality or not relevant. As a result, content that is pushed forward in Canada could fall to the bottom of the list for global audiences. That’s not good for anyone. Creators would have a harder time breaking through and connecting with the niche audiences out there who would actually love their content.

Now obviously one should expect google spin, but who the fuck is the government to regulate what content youtube chooses to present to its users? Does the government get to vet the TV Guides and red pen any shows they don't like?

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The left wing appears to believe they have achieved critical mass, and can now act freely and show who they really are.

 

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41 minutes ago, DB said:

One of my favourite youtube channels is "My Self Reliance". For those not familiar with it, it's an ongoing ASMR-like channel that shows a man building a log cabin largely solo and by hand, interspersed with some outstanding sequences of views of the Canadian back country, all leavened by playing retrieve with a really nice dog.

Anyway, in his most recent video he expresses concern for the future of his type of presentation on youtube due to bill C-11 currently making its way through the Canadian political process.

The video description includes this letter from Youtube:

Now obviously one should expect google spin, but who the fuck is the government to regulate what content youtube chooses to present to its users? Does the government get to vet the TV Guides and red pen any shows they don't like?

Unfortunately that's what the Canadian government has always done. They have always had a 15% Canadian content on TV and Radio, but there was always enough semi decent programming and enough shows are filmed in Canada so people didn't really notice it.

 The problem now is we have a complete narcissistic idiot in charge supported by a minority career politician. Both will do anything to stay in power and try to stay relevant and popular. They have already paid off the press with tax payer money with a slush fund under various title around combating internet compatition. All that's done is force those who eat at the trough to be more friendly towards them forcing more consumers away. Most people are starting  to see how useless he actually is and are turned off as they feel that propaganda should be free. They have the CBC for that. Now fewer people are watching. Causing the media companies to need more money from the trough to survive turning more people away.

He is probably hopping he can control this and push what little popularity he has, but all it will do is push people to invest in a VPN and set their location to somewhere other than Canada actually hurting Canadian content.

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Charter Considerations

The Minister of Justice has examined Bill C-11, An Act to enact the Consumer Privacy Protection Act and the Personal Information and Data Protection Tribunal Act and to make related and consequential amendments to other Acts, for any inconsistency with the Charter pursuant to his obligation under section 4.1 of the Department of Justice Act. This review involved consideration of the objectives and features of the Bill.

What follows is a non-exhaustive discussion of the ways in which Bill C-11 potentially engages the rights and freedoms guaranteed by the Charter. It is presented to assist in informing the public and Parliamentary debate on the Bill.

Overview

Bill C-11, also known as the Digital Charter Implementation Act, 2020, would repeal parts of the Personal Information Protection and Electronic Documents Act and replace them with a new legislative regime governing the collection, use, and disclosure of personal information for commercial activity in Canada. As the core of this regime, the Consumer Privacy Protection Act would be enacted to maintain, modernize, and extend existing rules and to impose new rules on private sector organizations for the protection of personal information. The Consumer Privacy Protection Act would also continue and enhance the role of the Privacy Commissioner in overseeing organizations’ compliance with these measures. The Personal Information and Data Protection Tribunal Act would be enacted to create a Tribunal to hear appeals of orders issued by the Privacy Commissioner and apply a new administrative monetary penalty regime created under the Consumer Privacy Protection Act.  Provisions of the Personal Information Protection and Electronic Documents Act governing electronic alternatives to paper records would be retained under the new title of the Electronic Documents Act.

 

more: Bill C-11: An Act to enact the Consumer Privacy Protection Act and the Personal Information and Data Protection Tribunal Act and to make related and consequential amendments to other Acts (justice.gc.ca)

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12 minutes ago, MiloMorai said:

Charter Considerations

The Minister of Justice has examined Bill C-11, An Act to enact the Consumer Privacy Protection Act and the Personal Information and Data Protection Tribunal Act and to make related and consequential amendments to other Acts, for any inconsistency with the Charter pursuant to his obligation under section 4.1 of the Department of Justice Act. This review involved consideration of the objectives and features of the Bill.

What follows is a non-exhaustive discussion of the ways in which Bill C-11 potentially engages the rights and freedoms guaranteed by the Charter. It is presented to assist in informing the public and Parliamentary debate on the Bill.

Overview

Bill C-11, also known as the Digital Charter Implementation Act, 2020, would repeal parts of the Personal Information Protection and Electronic Documents Act and replace them with a new legislative regime governing the collection, use, and disclosure of personal information for commercial activity in Canada. As the core of this regime, the Consumer Privacy Protection Act would be enacted to maintain, modernize, and extend existing rules and to impose new rules on private sector organizations for the protection of personal information. The Consumer Privacy Protection Act would also continue and enhance the role of the Privacy Commissioner in overseeing organizations’ compliance with these measures. The Personal Information and Data Protection Tribunal Act would be enacted to create a Tribunal to hear appeals of orders issued by the Privacy Commissioner and apply a new administrative monetary penalty regime created under the Consumer Privacy Protection Act.  Provisions of the Personal Information Protection and Electronic Documents Act governing electronic alternatives to paper records would be retained under the new title of the Electronic Documents Act.

 

more: Bill C-11: An Act to enact the Consumer Privacy Protection Act and the Personal Information and Data Protection Tribunal Act and to make related and consequential amendments to other Acts (justice.gc.ca)

Do you have a translation for those of us who don't speak Bureaucrat? 

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2 hours ago, DB said:

Now obviously one should expect google spin, but who the fuck is the government to regulate what content youtube chooses to present to its users? Does the government get to vet the TV Guides and red pen any shows they don't like?

🤔 

What have you said about regulation? It's a good thing right? I'm glad to see you've finally decided on what bridge is too far. 

Edited by rmgill
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1 hour ago, MiloMorai said:

Charter Considerations

The Minister of Justice has examined Bill C-11, An Act to enact the Consumer Privacy Protection Act and the Personal Information and Data Protection Tribunal Act and to make related and consequential amendments to other Acts, for any inconsistency with the Charter pursuant to his obligation under section 4.1 of the Department of Justice Act. This review involved consideration of the objectives and features of the Bill.

What follows is a non-exhaustive discussion of the ways in which Bill C-11 potentially engages the rights and freedoms guaranteed by the Charter. It is presented to assist in informing the public and Parliamentary debate on the Bill.

Overview

Bill C-11, also known as the Digital Charter Implementation Act, 2020, would repeal parts of the Personal Information Protection and Electronic Documents Act and replace them with a new legislative regime governing the collection, use, and disclosure of personal information for commercial activity in Canada. As the core of this regime, the Consumer Privacy Protection Act would be enacted to maintain, modernize, and extend existing rules and to impose new rules on private sector organizations for the protection of personal information. The Consumer Privacy Protection Act would also continue and enhance the role of the Privacy Commissioner in overseeing organizations’ compliance with these measures. The Personal Information and Data Protection Tribunal Act would be enacted to create a Tribunal to hear appeals of orders issued by the Privacy Commissioner and apply a new administrative monetary penalty regime created under the Consumer Privacy Protection Act.  Provisions of the Personal Information Protection and Electronic Documents Act governing electronic alternatives to paper records would be retained under the new title of the Electronic Documents Act.

 

more: Bill C-11: An Act to enact the Consumer Privacy Protection Act and the Personal Information and Data Protection Tribunal Act and to make related and consequential amendments to other Acts (justice.gc.ca)

 

1 hour ago, Wobbly Head said:

Do you have a translation for those of us who don't speak Bureaucrat? 

"Oops, that's the *other* C-11 act, not this one"?

This C-11 is "An Act to amend the Broadcasting Act and to make related and consequential amendments to other Acts"

See also this irrelevant Bill C-11: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Copyright_Modernization_Act

 

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34 minutes ago, rmgill said:

🤔 

What have you said about regulation? It's a good thing right? I'm glad to see you've finally decided on what bridge is too far. 

You have been, are, and I suspect always will be an idiot.

I've consistently argued for proportionate regulation, whereas you've been entirely against any of it until you're caught out advocating exactly the sort of regulation you've inanely argued against.

So, carry on and ruin yet another topic with your strawman bullshit, I see no value in engaging further with a halfwit.

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2 hours ago, DB said:

You have been, are, and I suspect always will be an idiot.

I've consistently argued for proportionate regulation,

1:10000 is a proportion 

1:1 is a proportion. 

10000000:1 is proportion. 

10000:0 is a proportion.

I repeatedly asked what level was too much for YOU.  Your refusal to be pinned down was telling. 
 

Now we know where you think its too large. When it comes to Trudeau telling Canadians what they can post about on Youtube, call it the Ottawa's RDA of Kids in the Hall proportion 

2 hours ago, DB said:

whereas you've been entirely against any of it until you're caught out advocating exactly the sort of regulation you've inanely argued against.

Bull crap. Its about regulation which is specific in application, appropriate for the level of government (federalism, look it up) and where narrowly tailored to a specific goal. 
 

My stance of speech is that no one should have the power short of specific instances like child pornography and the like. Anything more, I don't care if it's offensive nazi-pug jokes, wet ass pussy songs, or experts in a field going off of script and being silenced by the White House by way of social media corporate asshats, there should not be any censorship like that at all. Period. 
 


 

Edited by rmgill
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9 hours ago, DB said:

One of my favourite youtube channels is "My Self Reliance". For those not familiar with it, it's an ongoing ASMR-like channel that shows a man building a log cabin largely solo and by hand, interspersed with some outstanding sequences of views of the Canadian back country, all leavened by playing retrieve with a really nice dog.

Anyway, in his most recent video he expresses concern for the future of his type of presentation on youtube due to bill C-11 currently making its way through the Canadian political process.

The video description includes this letter from Youtube:

Now obviously one should expect google spin, but who the fuck is the government to regulate what content youtube chooses to present to its users? Does the government get to vet the TV Guides and red pen any shows they don't like?

We do have Canadian broadcast content rules to thank for The Great White North.  https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bob_and_Doug_McKenzie

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