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3 hours ago, R011 said:

Putting the text down doesn't work well in a high school class.

True. No student ever fibbed his way through a reading assignment.

Stop looking for excuses. This is completely crazy. If I learned one thing from Tropic Thunder, it is this:

Never go full retard!

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14 hours ago, Ssnake said:

FFS, "traumatic reading experience"?

Does having to read the script for a Samuel Beckett play multiple times to make a lighting design for it count? 

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  • 2 weeks later...

Opinion: Trudeau’s government is still trying to wreck Canadian YouTube

In late January, Dan Olson, a Canadian YouTuber, posted a self-produced documentary entitled “Line Goes Up — The Problem With NFTs.” Olson’s politics are not my own, but the disturbing questions he raises about the long-term implications of increasingly ubiquitous blockchain technology on everything from millennial wealth to personal privacy makes his two-hour video essential viewing.

 

I’ve been thinking of Olson — and the 449 Canadian YouTubers more popular than him — amid news that Prime Minister Justin Trudeau’s government intends to revive its stalled efforts to regulate YouTube in a more nationalistic direction. Trudeau’s project, after all, is grounded in a series of conclusions about the supposedly struggling state of Canadian digital content creators that are so insultingly at odds with observable reality as to invite suspicion of hidden, darker motives.

Bill C-11, the Online Streaming Act — the successor to the scrapped Bill C-10 that drew much scorn last spring — once again proposes placing YouTube (and other platforms like it) under the authority of the Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission (CRTC), which will have the power to force YouTube to categorize and distribute its content the way Canadian television and radio stations already must.

In practice, this means dictating “the proportion of time that shall be devoted to the broadcasting of Canadian programs,” as well as “prescribing what constitutes a Canadian program.” This could conceivably obligate YouTube to bury foreign videos whenever a Canadian uses its search engine, as well as force Canadian creators to fill out some sort of checklist when they upload a video in order to affirm it fulfills government-dictated criteria of Canadian-ness and is worthy of “discoverability” in the new search algorithm. It could even force Canadian users to automatically subscribe to channels the government thinks are worthy — à la Canadian cable providers’ current obligation to make Canadians subscribe to stations such as the CBC and the Aboriginal Peoples Television Network regardless if they want to or not. Clause 10.1(k) of the proposed legislation awards the CRTC ominous, open-ended power to decree regulations “respecting such other matters as it deems necessary for the furtherance of its objects.”

 

This is all being done in the name of a patriotic greater good: to protect Canada’s “cultural sovereignty” and “make our diverse Canadian voices, music, and stories heard across Canada and globally through a variety of services,” says the government’s news release, alongside the more ideologically precise objective of ensuring “greater representation of Indigenous peoples, racialized communities, cultural and linguistic minorities, LGBTQ2+ communities, and persons with disabilities” to guarantee “our culture and content will better reflect a 21st century Canada.”

It’s a remarkably ignorant statement given there’s little evidence these lofty objectives aren’t already being fulfilled by an unregulated YouTube.

https://www.washingtonpost.com/opinions/2022/04/13/canada-bill-c-11-youtube-trudeau/

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Line Goes Up - The problem  With NFTs more popular than him Bill C-11 last spring cultural sovereignty says the governments news release.

Alternatively, you could paste as plain text and people might be bothered to read your post.

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That's at least the second round for this particular book - it's original title was considered unacceptable for its original US release, it was changed to "Ten Little Indians" for some outside the US editions although the original title was available in the UK until 1985, according to wikipedia.

If I were intending to use a Christie novel as part of an course on story writing, I'd pick "The Murder of Roger Ackroyd" because of the unreliable narrator.

Although outright banning a book - i.e. making it illegal to sell or possess a particular work - is not a good thing, removing a book from a study curriculum is not quite the same as the Fahrenheit 451 scenario.

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8 minutes ago, DB said:

Although outright banning a book - i.e. making it illegal to sell or possess a particular work - is not a good thing, removing a book from a study curriculum is not quite the same as the Fahrenheit 451 scenario.

The banning has to start somewhere.

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On 5/30/2022 at 9:48 AM, MiloMorai said:

The banning has to start somewhere.

You must be happy seeing as these are the policies of the people you support.

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29 minutes ago, MiloMorai said:

They are??? Take off your rose tinted near sighted spectacles with horse blinders, please.

You support Democrats.  They support book banning.

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10 minutes ago, R011 said:

You support Democrats.  They support book banning.

Isn't Florida a Repub State?

Is Doug Ford a Demarcate?

As usual you misinterpreted my statement. One doesn't go for the whole shebang at the start. It is a little nick here and a little nick there. All those little nicks add up.  It was a statement of fact on how censorship starts.

 

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Yeah its republicans at Davos talking about recalibrating free speech. 
 

And for the record, when anyone talks about banning books I have an issue. But in a classroom for 10 year olds I don't consider it a ban if you don't put Skin Two magazine on the reading list. 

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3 hours ago, MiloMorai said:

Isn't Florida a Repub State?

Is Doug Ford a Demarcate?

As usual you misinterpreted my statement. One doesn't go for the whole shebang at the start. It is a little nick here and a little nick there. All those little nicks add up.  It was a statement of fact on how censorship starts.

 

Alexandra Ocasio-Cortez is and you post in support of her and other Democrats.  If you're claiming you support Conservatives in Ontario but socialists nd leftis liberals in the US then you're a very confused person or you aere not being truthful.

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55 minutes ago, MiloMorai said:
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In Florida, the majority of banned books touch on race (How to Be an Antiracist by Ibrahim Kendi, The Bluest Eye by Toni Morrison), sexuality (Forever by Judy Blume, Brave New World by Aldous Huxley)

"Brave New World"??! That's so ironic it probably bent the space-time continuum slightly. Maybe they could ban "Fahrenheit 451" next.

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1 hour ago, BansheeOne said:

"Brave New World"??! That's so ironic it probably bent the space-time continuum slightly. Maybe they could ban "Fahrenheit 451" next.

1984, Brave New World and Lord of the Flies as well. perhaps?  And even A Canticle for Leibowitz? 

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"Lord of the Flies", you say?

Quote

Why Is 'Lord of the Flies' Challenged and Banned?

Controversial Themes and Lurid Passages

By Esther Lombardi

Updated on May 30, 2019

"Lord of the Flies," a 1954 novel by William Golding, has been banned from schools over the years and has often been challenged. According to the American Library Association, it is the eighth-most frequently banned and challenged book in the nation. Parents, school administrators and other critics have decried the language and violence in the novel. Bullying is rampant throughout the book—indeed, it is one of the main plot lines. Many people also think that the book promotes a pro-slavery ideology, which they note is the wrong message to teach children.

The Plot 

In "Lord of the Flies," a plane crash during a wartime evacuation leaves a group of middle school boys stranded on an island. The plot may sound simple, but the story slowly degenerates into a savage survival-of-the-fittest tale, with the boys brutalizing, hunting and even killing some of their own.

Bans and Challenges

The overall theme of the book has led to many challenges and outright bans over the years. The book was challenged at Owen High School in North Carolina in 1981, for example, because it was "demoralizing inasmuch as it implies that man is little more than an animal," according to The Los Angeles Times. The novel was challenged at the Olney, Texas, Independent School District in 1984 because of "excessive violence and bad language," the ALA states. The association also notes that the book was challenged in Waterloo, Iowa schools in 1992 because of profanity, lurid passages about sex, and statements defamatory to minorities, God, women, and the disabled.

Racial Slurs

More recent versions of "Lord of the Flies" have modified some of the language in the book, but the novel originally used racist terms, particularly when referring to Black people. A committee of the Toronto, Canada Board of Education ruled on June 23, 1988, that the novel is "racist and recommended that it be removed from all schools" after parents objected to the book's use of racial profanity, saying that the novel denigrated Black people, according to the ALA. 

General Violence

A major theme of the novel is that human nature is violent and that there isn't any hope for redemption for humankind. The last page of the novel includes this line: "Ralph [the initial leader of the group of boys] wept for the end of innocence, the darkness of man's heart, and the fall through the air of the true, wise friend called Piggy." Piggy was one of the characters killed in the book. Many school districts "believe the book's violence and demoralizing scenes to be too much for young audiences to handle," according to enotes.

Despite attempts to ban the book, "Lord of the Flies" remains popular. In 2013, a first-edition—signed by the author—even sold for nearly $20,000. 

https://www.thoughtco.com/lord-of-the-flies-banned-challenged-740596#:~:text=Controversial Themes and Lurid Passages&text="Lord of the Flies%2C",challenged book in the nation.

 

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1 hour ago, sunday said:

It would be, if public school teachers had the ability to provide context, debate, and discussion.

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10 hours ago, MiloMorai said:

So where do the ON PCs lie on the political spectrum?

AOC would be a NDPer in Canada.

Now maybe you missed this in Republican Florida, Miami Bookstore Owners React to Florida's Whopping Number of Banned Books | Miami New Times

The Tories are well to the right of the American Demoocrats, thank you. 

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