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Meanwhile, In Yemen


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They are from the begining of the current conflict. There was a photo of a freshly burned out T-34s with people taking selfies.

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Saudi M60 crew leaves their tanks rear exposed to Houthi missileers and gets blown up, then the reaction force that arrives parks their vehicles in the open and takes no precautions and so loses two vehicles to the same missile launcher.

 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZRW0IIJbLD8

 

The moral of the story: The Saudi Army still sucks.

 

 

Saudis: These damn tanks keep on exploding! We must buy better tanks!

 

<_<

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I don't usually have any time for the Stop the War people in the UK (in fact, I have a very low opinion of them overall) but I think this article is pretty much on the nose:

http://www.stopwar.org.uk/index.php/news-comment/2117-500-days-of-uk-complicity-in-the-destruction-of-yemen#.V7Hf9pcqWMI.twitter

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That is why you dont give em to the Expendables.

Expendables have never won a war. I seriously doubt the will of the Saudi governement to actually win this war. What do they want instead?

 

They have enough empty desert for training, enough money to pay for it. Fuel is nearly free. But obviously they are unable to set up a decent training programme. They could easily hire foreign trainers.

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That is why you dont give em to the Expendables.

Expendables have never won a war. I seriously doubt the will of the Saudi governement to actually win this war. What do they want instead?

 

They have enough empty desert for training, enough money to pay for it. Fuel is nearly free. But obviously they are unable to set up a decent training programme. They could easily hire foreign trainers.

 

 

I'm pretty sure that the KSA's goal is to eliminate the Houthis taking territory in Yemen. Houthis are Shia and undoubtedly get support from Iran. So I would think the KSA would be serious about it. There are probably two main factors that are making it take a long time for KSA to finish the operation. The first reason is of course, the KSA isn't very skilled, even requesting the help from another GCC, I forgot who, to help by bringing over some Leclerc tanks. The other reason why it is probably difficult is because the Houthis are Shia and about 35-40% of the Yemen population is Shia, which are concentrated in the north western part of the country. KSA probably doesn't want to run into that thicket to pound Houthis. All videos I've seen so far of action in Yemen are out in the rocks and desert, no city fighting. KSA bombed a city which gave it some criticism, even giving Great Britain criticism since KSA bombings were done with British made Paveway guided bombs. So if the reason why this conflict in Yemen is dragging on because of no operation of going into the city to finish Houthis, then this conflict actually may never end or until the Houthis run out of steam. I suspect the current situation is just KSA holding the Houthis in the Shia populated area and preventing them from driving eastward again.

Edited by JasonJ
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That is why you dont give em to the Expendables.

Expendables have never won a war. I seriously doubt the will of the Saudi governement to actually win this war. What do they want instead?

 

They have enough empty desert for training, enough money to pay for it. Fuel is nearly free. But obviously they are unable to set up a decent training programme. They could easily hire foreign trainers.

 

http://www.meforum.org/441/why-arabs-lose-wars

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That is why you dont give em to the Expendables.

Expendables have never won a war. I seriously doubt the will of the Saudi governement to actually win this war. What do they want instead?

 

They have enough empty desert for training, enough money to pay for it. Fuel is nearly free. But obviously they are unable to set up a decent training programme. They could easily hire foreign trainers.

 

http://www.meforum.org/441/why-arabs-lose-wars

 

 

I would still have to press the other point being that the Houthis are based in the Shia populated area and that the KSA doesn't want to move its armed forces into there. It is probably reasonable to assume that the Houthis in the city areas are fully equipped with RPGs and ATGMs and such that it might give even a sizable American force a real tough time.

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That is why you dont give em to the Expendables.

Expendables have never won a war. I seriously doubt the will of the Saudi governement to actually win this war. What do they want instead?

 

They have enough empty desert for training, enough money to pay for it. Fuel is nearly free. But obviously they are unable to set up a decent training programme. They could easily hire foreign trainers.

 

 

I think at least part of the problem is having a large military with lots of fancy kit and plenty of money thrown at them but giving them nothing to do (that isn't thinking about how to grab more power for themselves internally). The Saudis have always been excellent at exporting violence away from the borders of the Kingdom, it's just that now they're doing it with their own military.

 

I don't have a hat but if I did, I'd offer to eat it if this doesn't come back to hurt them badly in the next ten years or so.

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Al Mukalla: Yemen government forces launched on Thursday a major military offensive to wrest the strategic Haradh city from Al Houthis in the northern province of Hajja near the border with Saudi Arabia.

The official page of the 5th Military Region on Facebook announced the offensive against the Iran-backed rebels and posted photos of the region’s commander, Major-General Ali Hamed Al Gushibi, inspecting the front-lines and soldiers firing heavy machines at Al Houthis positions.

The page reported that the troops launched the offensive from the Saudi side of the border and managed to recapture an old border crossing with the kingdom and stationed 2km from the city’s downtown.

Officials say capturing the entire city would calm part of the Saudi border as the rebels use Haradh as a launching point for shelling Saudi territories. Observers link the surge in Al Houthis military operations across the country to the current peace talks in Kuwait as the rebels seek to make more territorial gains to pressure the internationally recognised government to make major concessions.

Earlier this year, government forces cut a lifeline arms supply route for the rebels after recapturing the port of the city of Midi following fierce clashes with the rebel forces.

Yemen’s internationally recognised government has long accused the rebels of receiving their arms supplies from Iran through Midi seaport.

Meanwhile in the south, a local government official in the province of Lahj told Gulf News on Thursday that six Al Qaida operatives including a leading figure called Abdul Rahman Al Hajoum were arrested in the province’s capital of Huta after a successful raid on their bolt-holes.

Government forces have managed to restore peace and security to the once lawless province. Al Qaida exploited the fighting between government forces and Al Houthis to expand in the province.

Marching in from the neighbouring Aden city, hundreds of government troops pushed Al Qaida out of the province in April.

The governor of Lahj and other senior officials are now based in the province’s capital.

Also in Lahj province, local media reports said on Thursday that three Al Houthis fighters were killed when they tried to infiltrate into the government-controlled territories in the region of Karash. Jawas Al Salafi, a field commander in Karash front-line, told Aden Al Ghad news site that the rebel fighters tried to sneak into government-controlled areas.

In Aden, Yemen President Abd Rabbo Mansour Hadi on Wednesday ordered the city’s governor and chief security to step up security measures and keep forces on a heightened alert to thwart possible attacks by Al Qaida and Daesh-linked affiliates. Hadi’s order came hours after a blast claimed the lives of two soldiers in Aden.

A suspected Al Qaida operative standing near an army checkpoint in Mansoura district threw a bomb hidden inside a plastic bag.

“The bomb went off when soldiers gathered at the checkpoint after having lunch,” an official told Gulf News on Wednesday on the condition of anonymity because he was not authorised to brief reporters.

Aden’s chief of security Major-General Shalal Ali Shaye visited the injured soldiers in a hospital and vowed to hunt down the perpetrators.

Last week, a suicide bombing claimed by Al Qaida hit the convoy of Aden governor Aidarus Al Zubaidi, wounding three people travelling with him.

The militants also claimed two suicide bombings on Monday that killed 11 people in two of their former strongholds in the southeast.

Earlier this year, the Saudi-led coalition launched a major offensive against Al Qaida, helping to recapture the Hadramout provincial capital of Al Mukalla in April after a year of Al Qaida rule.

Coalition forces had previously focused their guns on Iran-backed Al Houthi militants and their allies who control the capital Sana’a and much of the north and centre, creating a power vacuum that Al Qaida and Daesh have exploited.

A year after Arab coalition forces drove Al Houthis out of the strategic city, government forces are in full control of the city despite these sporadic attacks by Daesh and Al Qaida.

Armed militants groups had been widely seen roaming around the city after liberation until government forces, mainly trained by the UAE military officers in Aden, took charge

of security and began raiding militants’ hideouts.

The security campaigns have resulted in a significant drop in daily drive-by shootings that target security personnel.

 

http://gulfnews.com/news/gulf/yemen/yemeni-forces-launch-offensive-against-al-houthis-near-saudi-border-1.1866527

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