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The Unnoticed Immigrant Food


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Of all the Asian cuisine, I am less fond of Korean and Filipino food.

 

Favourites include Japanese, Cantonese, Taiwanese, Thai, Malay, Indonesian, both Southern and Northern Indian.

 

If you like Naan you should go for the garlic version. Can die (as we say in Singapore).

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Lots of good food all over. In Texas, good BBQ, Mexican, Vietnamese.. NY and NJ, the pizza, pasta, Chinese (both regular take out and more authentic places), the bagels, USA in general.. cold cuts. Japan is not so good with cold cut sandwitches. But it's no problem, the udon, sushi, rice bowls, okonomiyaki, good Korean places here too. There was an Oktoberfest in Osaka, had to get there.. the sausage, the beer, my goodness. There really is a lot of gooood food out there. I skipped a lot in this post. Some of the food items are an acquired taste such as kimchi, sushi, and.. beer! But I've acquired the taste. So much good food.

Edited by JasonJ
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  • 2 weeks later...

Yeah, was in "Hong-couver" years ago and the sushi there is to die for.

 

Seafood in Sydney is also the absolute best.

 

Most of all, I love eating crabs in San Francisco Fisherman's Wharf. They are simply boiled in water (or brine).

 

The meat is not as tasty as the Sri Lankan version Singaporeans prefer. But the SF crab has easy to manage softer shells.

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  • 4 weeks later...
  • 2 months later...

I bet if an enterprising American who was skilled at any of the variety of bbq styles that exist through out the United States, went abroad and set up shop, they would probably be pretty popular with the locals. When people are willing to stand in line for multiple hours for a style of food, there has to be something universally right about that food.

 

 

On a side note, a cabinet smoker.....pretty cool

 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=P1zmAlaMmXg

Edited by Mr King
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Well I am going to try a new place that supposedly scores in the top 15 best burritos in the US here in good old San Antonio- Habaneros http://www.habanerosgrill.com/

I do love me a good burrito. Also found a place in Kirby, Texas that has excellent Bavarian style German food: http://www.yelp.com/biz/bavarian-restaurant-san-antonio

Good German chow. I need to get me some good grub since I have been working hard this week, and I owe it to me.

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  • 3 months later...

We now have a few South Indian restaurants, wholly or mostly meat-free (but very tasty fish curries) which have sneaked in under the cover of the usual horde of northern (from Peshawar to Dhaka) food. Tend to attract migrant Indian IT workers, & locals who want something new.

 

There's also a Romanian food shop, which makes a change from Polish.

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Greek. South Asian. British. Mexican. The last, well, not really really Mexican because the establishment is owned by a British guy who worked for a long time in Mexico as a cook or something and then married a Filipina and built his own Mexican restaurant near home offering authentic Mexican food (as he claims).

 

There are two Greek restaurants near home, one is owned by a Greek-Turk guy, the other is owned by a Greek. The former's restaurant is more Greek, the other is more diverse (i.e., Mediterranean - so includes Italian).

 

There's a couple of South Asian restaurants near home that offer that region's cuisine. I've had a bit of their curry and it is good. Haven't got the time to checkout the rest of their menu, though.

 

The British pub is farther from home. It is owned by a guy who made his money (and is more known here) as a hairdresser with his chain of beauty parlors. Offers traditional British fare and has an attached grocery for imported UK stuff. Lots of Brits eat there - pro'ly one reason are the Filipina waitresses who, at times, wear British school girl uniforms complete with short skirts and jackets....

 

Koreans I think I have mentioned in this thread before, and the main street where I live is practically Little Korea full of Korean restaurants and grocery shops.

 

And of course Persian food, or rather Middle East. There are two, the older one has been a mainstay selling shawarma, hummus, and such. I haven't tried the other one.

 

There used to be a Singaporean restaurant owned by a SG guy, just a few steps from home but it was IIRC expensive. I loved their curry though. Has since been converted into an appliance/general merchandise store selling stuff supposedly being sold at SG.

 

AH! I forgot about (I think - dunno if I mentioned earlier in the thread) a Swiss deli that offers Swiss/German/whatever food. It's actually the second Yurropeen (not French) restaurant near home, but the first closed after decades in operation and has since been relocated nearer home and named Swiss Deli. I've eaten there once and did not like the food (I recall order spatzl - I think I mentioned it in this thread or somewhere else in TN before), although it is a nice close source for other stuff that is typically found only at a deli and not at your usual grocery.

 

In hindsight, I like the place where I live. Just go to the main avenue and I can have my choice of Italian, Swiss/German, Korean, Japanese, Mexican, Persian/Middle East, South Asian, and American food. And this is just the suburbs so less "busy" compared to living in the big cities (e.g., Manila, Makati, Quezon City), and all these restaurants are just either a few steps away, or a bike ride, or a short drive.

Edited by Corinthian
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The British pub is farther from home. It is owned by a guy who made his money (and is more known here) as a hairdresser with his chain of beauty parlors. Offers traditional British fare and has an attached grocery for imported UK stuff. Lots of Brits eat there - pro'ly one reason are the Filipina waitresses who, at times, wear British school girl uniforms complete with short skirts and jackets....



this thread is worthless without pictures....

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The British pub is farther from home. It is owned by a guy who made his money (and is more known here) as a hairdresser with his chain of beauty parlors. Offers traditional British fare and has an attached grocery for imported UK stuff. Lots of Brits eat there - pro'ly one reason are the Filipina waitresses who, at times, wear British school girl uniforms complete with short skirts and jackets....

this thread is worthless without pictures....

 

Hear, hear!

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The "Persian" restaurants here have both kebab and shawarma. :lol: Some of the staff even call the food Arabic. :D :D :D

 

Oh dear....

 

As for the useless-without-pix comments above, since both of you have FB, see https://www.facebook.com/Union-Jack-Tavern-211064230737/. They might have photos of the staff there.

Edited by Corinthian
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The British pub is farther from home. It is owned by a guy who made his money (and is more known here) as a hairdresser with his chain of beauty parlors. Offers traditional British fare and has an attached grocery for imported UK stuff. Lots of Brits eat there - pro'ly one reason are the Filipina waitresses who, at times, wear British school girl uniforms complete with short skirts and jackets....

This bloke?

 

He's sponsored all-women cycling groups to take part in audaxes, up to & including the PBP (Paris-Brest-Paris ride, 1230 km in no more than 90 hours: successful completion of a series of rides up to 600 km within time limits required to qualify for entry).

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Yep that guy. Yeah, he has an all-female cycling team here - and many of the members are really pretty especially the one on the lower right. :wub:

 

 

I once found myself riding inside the group (meant to follow them ahehe... but found meself soon inside :o ) and nearly hit one of them so I braked hard and I crashed. Fortunately, I didn't hit any of them otherwise I would've been sued :lol:

 

And yeah, he is probably twice larger than me but he can ride faster and longer times than I do.

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  • 2 weeks later...
  • 9 months later...

Took the family and Nephew for Dosa last night, he is very, very happy and surprisingly felt content afterwards. Rare for a 21 year male to have eaten enough.....

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I grew up in the San Francisco bay area (southbay -- San Jose). It offers a huge diversity of food genres, so other places I've lived have been more notable for lacking specific types.

 

Here in Sonoma County, we're swimming in Mexican food (which is great -- I love the stuff), but good Indian is lacking, and the folks here seem averse to asian food in general other than Chinese.

 

We've seen them come and go, and Japanese restaurants here follow a distinct pattern:

1) They open as a Japanese restaurant, offering good quality Japanese food.

2) Business stalls for lack of customers.

3) One of:

.... a ) they stick with it anyway and go out of business,

.... b ) they switch to a "Fusion" offering (mixing Chinese, Thai, etc into their menu) and about two-thirds go out of business,

.... c ) they switch to Americanized "Japanese" dishes (more fried, more beef, less raw fish) and about two-thirds go out of business.

 

The only good sushi I've been able to find anywhere within twenty miles is Yireh Sushi in west Santa Rosa. They recently took option 3a (remade themselves, changed their name from "Sunnyside Tokyo", and retargeted to a more upscale audience), and I'm hoping they buck the trend and stick around for a while.

 

One novelty I've not seen anywhere else is the family-owned/run "Laotian Teriyaki" restaurant, also in west Santa Rosa. It chose the 3b path, and has been struggling along for years but not dead yet. Their "Laotian Specialties" are now a small subsection of the menu, the rest taken up by semi-authentic Thai, Chinese, Cajun, Japanese offerings.

 

Their prices are low (for the area), their ingredients are fresh (I regularly see the younger son carrying in crates of carrots and broccoli from local farms), their portions are large, and I'm a big fan of their chicken teriyaki. I've shown my face frequently enough that the owner sees me walk in the door and shouts over her shoulder "LAHGE CHIKHEN TEHIYAKEEE!" It's nice to be remembered :-D

 

Shameless plug:

http://ciar.org/ttk/food/473stony/

 

That menu is a couple years old; I should pick up a new one.

Edited by TTK Ciar
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