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Soldiers struggle to pull a huge piece of artillery through mud. The gun has been placed on a track created for a light railway. The soldiers are pushing a device, attached to the gun, that possibly slots into the tracks. Some of the men are in a ditch that runs alongside the track, the rest are on the track itself. A makeshift caterpillar tread has been fitted to the wheels of the gun, in an attempt to aid its movement through the mud. (National Library of Scotland)
- See more at: http://coolgallery.pics/index.php/World-War-I-in-Photos-The-Western-Front/w_12#sthash.Sj1TWKXe.dpuf

 

 

 

The caption I have for this one reads:

 

"Shortage of transport animals and the often impassable state of the country for motor vehicles frequently compelled the artillerymen to become their own beasts of burden. Even the rough track of this Decauville railway does little to lighten their labour."

 

COMMENT: ref the bold statement, I would have thought that this is the limber with which a gun of this type would be equipped.

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Guns like this did not normally have a ammunition limber but might have a light limber attached to the trails to aid in spreading the weight and supporting the trails.

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gas blinded Belgian 55th division troops 1916

 

3HvxoC4.jpg

Belgian? I think they are Brits from the uniforms, headgear and epaulette titles. :)

 

BillB

 

 

If it helps, the caption I have for this picture is

 

"TEAR-GAS TOLL

 

Though less permanently damaging than toxic mixtures of chlorine and phosgene, lacrymatory gas often disabled men for months at a time. Here at a dressing station at Béthune are men temporarily blinded by the gas during the German Lys offensive."

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According to a 1925 field artillery journal article dogs can carry 30-80lb or draw 75-100lb on a toboggan or 150-200lb on a sledge. They can cover 15-20 miles per day as a pack animal and 20-30 as a draft animal. For reference as horse is listed as carrying about 250to 275lb or draw a 1500lb wagon. So a horse is worth about 5 dogs.

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Just noticed this.

 

If that's an up-ended A7V, I can't see how it could be 1916.

 

Wiki mentions 2 A7V "toppled" at the Second Battle of Villers-Bretonneux

 

A7V was used in the Second Battle of the Marne, but wiki claims none lost.

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Just noticed this.

 

If that's an up-ended A7V, I can't see how it could be 1916.

 

Wiki mentions 2 A7V "toppled" at the Second Battle of Villers-Bretonneux

 

A7V was used in the Second Battle of the Marne, but wiki claims none lost.

A7Vs 506 "Mephisto" and 542 "Elfriede" both ditched at Villers-Bretonneux on 24 April 1918. 542 fell onto its side in British territory, while 506 was in a shell hole behind German lines. After 542 toppled over, its 2Lt. Stein was killed in dismounted fighting against the British infantry who were prepared to surrender to the tank moments before, and another member of its 22-man complement was taken prisoner by the British. Both sides eventually left the tank where it was, and the Germans sent an engineer to destroy 542 that night. However, nobody told him that two A7Vs were ditched, and the first one he came to was tank 506--the one in German territory. He dutifully blew it up, and the Australians later recovered the carcass, which they still have on display. 542 was recovered by the British 1st Battalion, Tank Corps, and French 37th Division on 15 May 1918. The tank in the video is 542; you can just make out the lower half of the name "Elfriede" on the front of the tank.
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Whoever was responsible for captioning some of these pics didn't really do a very good job... :)

 

BillB

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Riding on those spuds in an unsprung vehicle must have been miserable once the ground got the least bit firm...

 

I imagine the whole experience of riding inside those early tanks was all around miserable, whats a few extra bumps. :)

 

Trafalgar Square, London 1917

 

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