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Weird And Wonderful Afv's


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The Israelis are good for weird & wonderful because they don't like to throw anything away. Instead, they convert it. Hence all the Sherman-based SPGs & SP mortars, & the Centurions, captured T-55s etc. rebuilt into anything & everything. "It's a chassis. Put something on it."

 

The Germans in WW2 were much the same with all their captured Czech & French tanks (& the hulls still coming out of the factories).

Edited by swerve
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A modern version of the multi-barrelled mortar system is the SM-4 developed by Noricum of Austria. The original system was mounted on a Unimog chassis. The Multi-Mortar-Gavin™ was developed to meet a Canadian requirement.

 

 

Are you sure that isn't a pipe organ for the use of chaplains?

 

I can hear 'Amazing Grace' just looking at it.

Edited by DougRichards
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Interesting UC variant. "Destroy, Destroy" "Exterminate! Exterminate!"

 

 

 

 

FIFY. Presumably an early model before they went to the tower configuration and added the plunger.

 

 

Danger, Will Robinson, Danger, Danger (at least that one had tracks)

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The Israelis are good for weird & wonderful because they don't like to throw anything away. Instead, they convert it. Hence all the Sherman-based SPGs & SP mortars, & the Centurions, captured T-55s etc. rebuilt into anything & everything. "It's a chassis. Put something on it."

 

The Germans in WW2 were much the same with all their captured Czech & French tanks (& the hulls still coming out of the factories).

 

Yeah, the Israelis had a boatload of T...62s? regunned with M68/L7 105s and re-engined with teledyne diesels. Did they keep those for own use or sell them after re-manufacturing?

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I still wonder how two crew on that elevating MG carrier were supposed to fit in that mechanism and be remotely comfortable...

Looks like a tow bar on the front. Possibly towed behind another vehicle, such as another carrier?

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Yeah, the Israelis had a boatload of T...62s? regunned with M68/L7 105s and re-engined with teledyne diesels. Did they keep those for own use or sell them after re-manufacturing?

 

They converted T-54 and T-55s with 105mm, but T-62s kept 115mm as those were judged to be actually better performing then L7, so no conversion was needed. Another factor was that T-62s were actually only available in larger quantities after 1982 (there were less then 100 in use IIRC before 1982) when there was much less need to use captured tanks.

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They converted T-54 and T-55s with 105mm, but T-62s kept 115mm as those were judged to be actually better performing then L7, so no conversion was needed. Another factor was that T-62s were actually only available in larger quantities after 1982 (there were less then 100 in use IIRC before 1982) when there was much less need to use captured tanks.

 

Actually, it was suggested to change 115mm to 105mm due to limited amount of captured ammunition, only 3700. A total of 132 T-62 were captured, 79 of them being serviceable.

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Finnish VK

 

 

 

Why did you have to dig up pic find this worthless POS...

Edited by CV9030FIN
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I still wonder how two crew on that elevating MG carrier were supposed to fit in that mechanism and be remotely comfortable...

 

Considering they only had a narrow slit to see out of and carriers aren't very stable at the best of times, I would imagine trying to see where they were going would be a more pressing concern

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Finnish VK

 

 

 

Why did you have to dig up pic find this worthless POS...

It doesn't look particularly weird or wonderful, so I looked it up, & found that it's oddness is as you say. I agree, it doesn't really fit.

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They converted T-54 and T-55s with 105mm, but T-62s kept 115mm as those were judged to be actually better performing then L7, so no conversion was needed. Another factor was that T-62s were actually only available in larger quantities after 1982 (there were less then 100 in use IIRC before 1982) when there was much less need to use captured tanks.

 

Actually, it was suggested to change 115mm to 105mm due to limited amount of captured ammunition, only 3700. A total of 132 T-62 were captured, 79 of them being serviceable.

 

 

I'll see if I can find the data in the various books I have 'round here that discusses the re-arming. I know some did get the M68/L7 re-arming, but which ones I don't recall...I've got a couple of books to refer to, and I'll see what I can find.

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Wow! An ArchaeoStuGosaurus !!!

 

 

The Austrian pre-war ADMK. After several iterations became the Saurer RK-7, which was taken over by the Wehrmacht after Anschluss as the Sd. Kfz 254. They saw service in North Africa, the Balkans and the Soviet Union. All 129 produced were lost in action.

 

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