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Its Chili Season, Looking For Recipe Suggestions


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Same here.

 

It is awesome when minced and mixed with sisig. ^_^

 

 

(^the chili not yet minced and mixed with the sisig)

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In the States chili can mean the dish, or the vegetable, but we also call a chili a pepper, not to be confused with the pepper that comes from the peppercorns of the pepper plant......English is such a bastard language.

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Beans are fixin's and go on the side of the heavenly dish. Only a barbarian, ignorant of the qualities of great cuisine adds them to the pot! :D You can place them carefully beside the bowl of red, same with cornbread, rice, etc. Only the pure elixer goes in the pot!

Unless you want it to be delicious....then add beans :D :P

 

I can't think of very many American foods that are more contested about how they are made.

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Texans get all sorts of stuff wrong, but the chili+rice thing is brilliant. Especially if you use rice with some tooth to it, like wild & brown.

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Beans are fixin's and go on the side of the heavenly dish. Only a barbarian, ignorant of the qualities of great cuisine adds them to the pot! :D You can place them carefully beside the bowl of red, same with cornbread, rice, etc. Only the pure elixer goes in the pot!

Unless you want it to be delicious....then add beans :D :P

 

I can't think of very many American foods that are more contested about how they are made.

 

 

So, if you add beans to chili after it comes to the table it's ok? I just love these unwritten rules :D It's like white ankle socks for riding your bike.

What sort of beans do you use btw and how should they be prepared?

 

/R

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Traditionally, kidney and pinto beans are used, though you can find a few recipes that use black beans.

 

Beans in chili is sort of like the Thirty Years War, only more heated.

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Alright, I'm a late comer to this topic, but it is dear to my heart. My office has a heavily-contested chili contest every year, featuring all sorts of chili (given that the staff comes from everywhere from Texas to Maine and beyond). I won it this year with the following recipe; it doesn't sound that traditional, but actually came out that way. I dubbed it "Memphis Backcountry Chili" (previous year I did "Five Critter Chili" and came in second place).

 

(Note that I don't put quantities in, except broadly. I cook to taste, and guesswork is half the fun)

 

Start by lining the bottom of the pot with bacon (good, thick stuff), and then cover with diced sweet onions (Vidalias for preference).

 

Cook it down, then add a couple of pounds of ground venison. Brown it good, stir it all up.

 

Add a pound or so of ground Bison (no good reason other than I like it much better than beef). Brown.

 

Dice up a couple of pounds of venison loin -- really small. Add and brown.

 

Add the contents of a Carroll Shelby chili kit (really, the best available commercially) but DON'T add the chili powder.

 

Add chipotle powder to suit (lots of flavor, only moderate head, good for contests)

 

Add a ton of petite diced tomatoes. Don't drain the cans first; the extra water is going to be necessary, because this stuff is going to cook for a while and you don't want it to dry out.

 

Add a cup or so of dark brown sugar.

 

Stew for a while. Add corn starch/water mix to thicken as needed.

 

After everything is cooking together nicely, get a rack of hickory-smoked ribs (you do have a ready supply in the freezer, don't you?). Cut them into individual ribs. Dump them in. Important Note: Count the ribs! Your going to need to pull the bones out later. Don't use the end bit with the tiny bones, you can never find them all.

 

Cook on lowest heat for a couple of hours.

 

Here's the controversial part. I often add beans, not a ton, but usually a can each of light and dark pintos, maybe a third of brown beans, but I always add them late in the process, as I think they absorb too much flavor if you add them early.

 

Cook for a bit. Then let cool overnight (I make chili in big quantities, so it can take six hours to really cool).

 

Next day, heat again, slowly and on low. Cook for two or three hours, salt as need. By this point, the meet should be all off the ribs, and the bones need to be fished out. Remember when I said to count them?

 

Salt to taste, and serve with sour cream.

 

OK, so it is totally non-traditional, but the flavor is great. And it seems the more you reheat it, the better it gets. At the contest this year, I was roundly taunted by the traditional Texas chili makers, but the final came down to me and a Brazilian (who did a traditional Texas chili, but with Brazilian peppers and other spices)

 

Pat

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  • 2 weeks later...

Every type of spicy stew is better on day two or three than it is on day one. it simply takes that long for the spices to settle into the other ingredients. That and the "relaxation" of the meat.

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  • 2 months later...
  • 2 years later...

What is this Murph's chili, it looks delicious!

 

/R

Murph posted it here a number of years ago and I saved it. The original post was probably pruned a long time ago.

 

Never having cooked chili from scratch, I tried it and it's a good recipe:

 

 

 

3 lbs coarsely ground meat

1 large onion, finely chopped

3 cloves of garlic, finely chopped

1 teaspoon of ground oregano

1 teaspoon ground comino (cumin)

4-8 oz of good quality chili powder

1 can of Rotel diced tomatoes and green chilis

2 large (15 oz) cans of tomato sauce

2 cups of water

1 can of tomato paste

1 teaspoon salt

2 teaspoons of paprika

1 teaspoon of ground cayenne pepper

brown the meat, onions and garlic together. After it is browned, pour off almost all of the fat, and add all the other ingredents. Simmer for at least two hours on very low heat.

Serve with beans (ON THE SIDE!!!!), grated cheddar cheese, rice, and saltine crackers.

 

I modified it by using a combination of stew meat and regular ground beef instead of coarse (stew meat > ground beef), using at least twice as many cloves of garlic, and eliminating the salt after my family complained that it was "too salty".

 

​Everybody who tries it loves it, the main compliment being how thick and hearty it is. My wife and daughters love to put the leftover chili on baked potatoes.

 

​I usually cook it on the stove, but I'll often make it in a dutch oven, either on a campfire or in one of my barbecue pits. This go-around, I browned the meat in a skillet over a fire before adding it to the pot on the stove.

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It is getting towards Chili time here. It also goes well on Tamales from Telez on General McMullen. They open at 5 am, and if you are not there by 5:30 they are sold out. On holiday weeks, you have to get there at exactly 5 am, if you are 15 minutes late, they are sold out.

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  • 5 weeks later...

 

What is this Murph's chili, it looks delicious!

 

/R

Murph posted it here a number of years ago and I saved it. The original post was probably pruned a long time ago.

 

Never having cooked chili from scratch, I tried it and it's a good recipe:

 

 

 

3 lbs coarsely ground meat

1 large onion, finely chopped

3 cloves of garlic, finely chopped

1 teaspoon of ground oregano

1 teaspoon ground comino (cumin)

4-8 oz of good quality chili powder

1 can of Rotel diced tomatoes and green chilis

2 large (15 oz) cans of tomato sauce

2 cups of water

1 can of tomato paste

1 teaspoon salt

2 teaspoons of paprika

1 teaspoon of ground cayenne pepper

brown the meat, onions and garlic together. After it is browned, pour off almost all of the fat, and add all the other ingredents. Simmer for at least two hours on very low heat.

Serve with beans (ON THE SIDE!!!!), grated cheddar cheese, rice, and saltine crackers.

I modified it by using a combination of stew meat and regular ground beef instead of coarse (stew meat > ground beef), using at least twice as many cloves of garlic, and eliminating the salt after my family complained that it was "too salty".

 

​Everybody who tries it loves it, the main compliment being how thick and hearty it is. My wife and daughters love to put the leftover chili on baked potatoes.

 

​I usually cook it on the stove, but I'll often make it in a dutch oven, either on a campfire or in one of my barbecue pits. This go-around, I browned the meat in a skillet over a fire before adding it to the pot on the stove.

 

Thanks! This reminds me of the recipe I'm using. Mine uses meat which is boiled until no longer meat though :)

 

 

 

/R

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  • 4 weeks later...

I like this recipe for green chili

http://www.seriouseats.com/recipes/2017/03/easy-pressure-cooker-pork-chile-verde-recipe.html

 

Ingredients
  • 4 pounds (1.9kg) boneless pork shoulder, cut into 2-inch chunks
  • 3/4 pound tomatillos (about 4 tomatillos; 350g), quartered, husks discarded
  • 2/3 pound Poblano peppers (about 2 peppers; 300g), roughly chopped, seeds and stems discarded (see note)
  • 6 ounces Anaheim or Cubanelle peppers (about 2 peppers; 170g), roughly chopped, seeds and stems discarded (see note)
  • 2 serrano or jalapeño chilies, roughly chopped, stems discarded (see note)
  • 8 ounces white onion (about 1 medium; 225g), roughly chopped
  • 6 medium cloves garlic, peeled
  • 1 tablespoon (15g) whole cumin seed, toasted and ground
  • Kosher salt
  • 1/2 cup loosely packed fresh cilantro leaves and fine stems (about 1/2 ounce; 15g), plus more for garnish
  • 1 tablespoon (15ml) Asian fish sauce
  • Fresh corn tortillas and lime wedges, for serving
  • Directions
    1. 1.

      In a pressure cooker, combine pork, tomatillos, Poblano peppers, Anaheim peppers, serrano peppers, onion, garlic, cumin, and a big pinch of salt. Heat over high heat until gently sizzling, then seal pressure cooker, bring to high pressure, and cook for 30 minutes. Release pressure.

    2. 2.

      Using tongs, transfer pork pieces to a bowl and set aside. Add cilantro and fish sauce to remaining contents of pressure cooker. Blend with an immersion blender or in a countertop blender, then season to taste with salt. Return pork to sauce and stir gently to combine. Serve immediately with tortillas and lime wedges.

       

      Notes

      If you'd like, you can use other fresh green chilies in place of Anaheims, Poblanos, and serranos. Using 100% Hatch chilies is a good way to go. You can also replace the fresh chilies with frozen or jarred roasted green chilies, using the same amount by weight.

Edited by Harold Jones
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  • 6 months later...

I made this recipe for slow cooker "Cuban" shredded beef, only I replaced the beef with a 7lb pork shoulder and upped the ingredients accordingly for the bigger cut of meat. I let the meat hit an internal temp of about 190F. All of the fat, collagen, and juices rendered out of the meat, a lot more than I expected. I pulled the meat, and served it in a bowl in the "broth" and it reminds me very much of a red chili. It is fantastic, and I can see myself making this on a regular basis.

 

This is the recipe straight from the site I got it from before I upped the ingredients. I just remembered while typing this I forgot to put the cilantro in. I will have to do that and see how it affects the flavor profile.

 

6 whole cloves garlic
2-2 1/2 lbs. beef chuck roast or flank steak
1 tablespoon oil
FOR THE ROPA VIEJA:
2 (8 ounce) cans tomato sauce
1 green bell pepper, thinly sliced
1 medium onion, thinly sliced
1 (4 ounce) can chopped green chilies
2 tablespoons tomato paste
2 teaspoons EACH dried oregano AND salt
1 tablespoon EACH ground cumin AND white vinegar
1/2 teaspoon red pepper flakes
1/4 cup chopped cilantro + more for serving
Edited by Mr King
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  • 3 weeks later...

Been perfecting my pulled pork "chili" based on the recipe above. The only liquid I add to it is 3 small cans of tomato sauce, the rest comes out of the pork shoulder. I imagine a bit of it is from the solution the meat packers add to the meat to pump up the weight. Got to love the things they get away with. But it works out for me.

 

k0DbALe.jpg

 

Also came across this link for Championship winning chili recipes

 

https://www.casichili.net/recipes.html

Edited by Mr King
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  • 4 months later...

Made a big batch today, of the chili I showed above, but with ground beef instead of pork, and I added beans and sweet corn, and a masa slurry to thicken it up. I call it bastard chili, because it is not based on a chili recipe, and has all the things people say make chili not chili. But damn if it don't taste good, and that is all that matters to me.

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