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Chieftain Questions


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1. What is the rectangular box on rear of turret? It has some duct work leading to or from it. I seen something similar on back of Scimitar hull.

2. On rear of Chieftain hull what is the purpose rectangular box with 3 exhaust? Presumably 2 are used for engine exhaust.

3. On right mid hull under turret. What is the circular thing

4. Did the Mk 5 use a ranging machine gun?

5. Did Mk 5 have night vision capability (as in could the search light could be depicted either filtered or white light correctly on a model)?

Edited by DT
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1. NBC pack.

2. Vented armoured box for three exhausts-the small one is for the GUE-I think it is to cool the exhaust, can't recall exactly.

3. Electrics exit the vehicle at this point; there is a large distribution box fixed to the hull internally below this cover.

4. Never saw one myself but there were various marques of MK5; the RMG had only recently been removed when I joined in 1984.

5. The searchlight had an IR cover which could be swung out of the way (electrically) to give white light.

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5. The searchlight had an IR cover which could be swung out of the way (electrically) to give white light.

 

5 yes thats the idea of the IR searchlight

 

How on earth that worked? :blink: Pics of the mechanism?

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Thanks Stu! Your answer was good, but useless... :huh:

 

Ie. I don't own any Chieftain book's... :D

 

Edit: Second question: Is Chieftain search light slaved with maingun? If so how this is done as the light is not above or side of guntube? (See: Russian T-series or US M-48/60 series)

Edited by CV9030FIN
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The searchlight had a outer door to protect it from elements only, if this was open the light was in white light mode, if required the IR door could also be opened giving a 2kw white light, as for slaving it, simplicity itself, does not need to be above below alongside to be slaved, light was mounted inside the box on gimbals the whole thing connected to a servo linked to gun, so gun goes up light goes up, gun goes down light goes down. The gunner also had a trim control that gave a few mils elevation and depresssion to help alighn the beast.

 

Used in 2 ways, 1 as Stu said the buddy system or 2nd in IR mode with gunners and commanders IR sights fitted, mostly used in white light mode to denote 120mm had been fired at the attacking force. A great bit of kit on the main roads for annoying the ignorant drivers out there.

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..mostly used in white light mode to denote 120mm had been fired at the attacking force.

 

Wouldn't that be rather obvious :huh:

 

I believe he means in FTX's back in the old days when we didn't have those duel simulators...

Edited by CV9030FIN
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6. Where is the backup (auxillary) sight located? Is it that swing piece by cupola like the Challenger has?

7. On MK.10 or 11 a groove or opening is on the right side of Stillbrew piece of mantlet in front of sight. What is it for?

9. What is raised piece with groove between loader and TC hatch?

Edited by DT
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6. Where is the backup (auxillary) sight located? Is it that swing piece by cupola like the Challenger has?

7. On MK.10 or 11 a groove or opening is on the right side of Stillbrew piece of mantlet in front of sight. What is it for?

9. What is raised piece with groove between loader and TC hatch?

 

number six answers number seven the groove is for the aux sight which was a rather long telescopic sight if I remember which needed the groove mentioned in question seven.

The raised piece is probably the light for the MRS (Muzzle Referance System) a system that uses a mirror located on the end of the main gun to compencate for muzzle droop.

 

That's going by memory and this picture

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The part of the turret it occupies is in the welded roof section-as opposed to the main cast section-dunno if that has anything to do with it's function?

My first thought upon seeing it was that it was to give added beef between the two openings. Then I noticed it isn't a homogenous piece of steel, there is what appears to be a lighter metal cap running the length along the top and one side. However, that doesn't mean it wasn't intended to serve dual purposes, strength and a wiring cable way.

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Stuart, NOTHING was designed in the Chieftain to stop you banging your head on it! A morning in the Sim with no headgear on left your head battered and bruised. Just had an idea about our mystery "flange" btw; it's close to the header tank for the Temperature Compensated Link Bar so I suppose it's possible the tank has an extension running rearwards to give it more surface area? Clutching at straws....

 

Edit; ended up asking over at ArRSe, I await the no-doubt colourful replies!

Edited by jmcmtank
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Good Lad! That was the picture.

 

So hands up, who would like to be the driver of this historic submersible? :P

I'd cheerfully pass on gunner and loader as well. :blink:

 

Seeing the TC up there taking in the view reminds me of the Vulcan crew who disabled the pilots' ejection seats, since there were none for the rest...

Edited by shep854
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A message from my editor (mods hope you do not mind)

 

I am pleased to officially announce that Mr Robert Griffin's new title "Photosniper 007-Chieftain Main Battle Tank: Development and Active Service from Prototype to Mk.11" from the well known Polish company Kagero Publishing will be released in late January 2013. I have had the pleasure of doing the English language editing for this work and I can tell everyone it promises to give a fine account of all the gun tank variants (Mk.1 to Mk.11). Bob has described the history as only one who has lived it can do. The book includes ORBATS (with callsigns) for a Chieftain regiment (guess which one!) in the early 1970s and again in 1989, plans for a Mk.3/3 and a Mk11, and a fine selection of over a dozen colour plates of Chieftains in British, Iranian and Kuwaiti service for the modeller. The Shrivenham Mk.11 gets the full walkaround detail treatment with lots of detail shots and there are plentiful developmental and in-service photographs of all the gun tank versions. The book will run to over 80 pages, nearly all of which have black and white and colour illustrations. Kagero has done a fine job presenting the material and it will be certain to please all fans of British postwar armour.

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