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The USMC was ahead of the JA with regard to tracked amphibians, including armored ones, but in most respects Japan had an advanced doctrine, training and organizational edge over the West with regard to amphibious warfare. They had landed on the north shore of the Yellow Sea in army strength in 1905, displayed bow ramp landing craft in their regimental landings around Shanghai in 1938 and they conducted corps level landings on the Canton coast in 1940. By comparison, the USMC landed battalions for training in the 1920s, a regiment in 1939-40 and administratively landed a 2/3 division on Guadalcanal in 1942.

 

We caught up and exceeded the JA for sure, by 1943. However, the JA had an interesting counterlanding doctrine that they tried in a few places, that the USN/USMC never needed or could execute [in 1941].

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  • 3 months later...

In the 2014 midterm defense power equipment plan, 99 of them are planned to be made by March 2019.

 

The last page in the PDF shows what's planned for purchase in the mid-term. Of course, year by year budget may alter the result of the plan.

 

http://www.mod.go.jp/j/approach/agenda/guideline/2014/pdf/chuki_seibi26-30.pdf

 

It's seen that as many as 200 to 300 MCVs are to be made by 2023. Part of this plan includes cutting the current total tank force to eventually about 300. Assuming 100 Type 10s, that would have to mean some Type 90s retiring. Leads me to suspect those being offered for sale by then. IIRC, while the SDF budget as a whole has gone up a little recently, the increase was in the JMSDF and JASDF while the JGSDF had a slight cut. So I'd imagine units that operated Type 74s will transition to the MCVs.

 

These MCVs are supposedly air transportable by Kawasaki C-2s. If that works out, it should result in a fairly flexible SDF, adding some weight to "collective self-defense." There is also a family of designs around the MCV such as troop carrier or mobile 120mm mortar but I haven't noticed any concrete plans with those designs yet.

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That's pretty cool. I can't imagine that there are very many Japanese WW2 tanks around in running condition.

 

Yeah, there aren't.

 

I recall seeing 3 others up until now, all Type 95 Ha-Go light tanks. 1 in Russia, 1 in Japan, and 1 in Thailand. So a Chi-Ha is really neat to see.

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There was also talk about restoring some of Kubinka Type 94, Type 97 or Type 4 Ke-Nu, as all of them are considered to be in decent shape.

Edited by bojan
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There was also talk about restoring Kubinka Type 3 Ke-Ri and/or Type 4 Ke-Nu, both of them considered to be in decent shape.

That sounds great. Can I bother you for a link about that? Russian is fine even though I can't read it.

 

 

 

 

And I forgot one, there is a running Type 89 medium tank in Japan as well.

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No link, it was some time ago on Russian forum. It is not set in stone, but as noted all are in decent condition. Roman might know more...

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No link, it was some time ago on Russian forum. It is not set in stone, but as noted all are in decent condition. Roman might know more...

Ok thanks anyway bojan :) Great pictures.

 

I found this link which may lead to more.

 

http://spox-ru.spox.ru/ru/blog/4526.mejdunarodni.html

 

Roman, can I bother you for anything about this?

Edited by JasonJ
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  • 7 months later...

It's almost kind of a shame the Japanese didn't get the Chi-Ri into production. I'm guessing the single prototype that was brought to the US was scrapped?

It is unknown as to what happened to the single Chi-Ri prototype after the Americans have found it and taken pictures of it, both with its treads removed and on. A mix of pictures showing treads removed and on suggest to me that they must have driven it around a bit. It's not known if the Chi-Ri made it to the US. It is rumored that the Chi-Ri along, with a number of other Imperial Japanese weapons such as the Chi-To and 149.1mm AA cannon barrel(s), were on route to the US when a storm hit and all the stuff were dumped into the ocean. Just a rumor and giving the number of rumors that float around regarding some Imperial Japanese stuff, I couldn't say that the rumor stands a good chance of being true.

 

But anyway, the Chi-Ri prototype was completed and conducted trials in March 1945 but it did not get the green light for production. A Chi-To prototype was also completed and conducted trials in March 1945. The Chi-To was deemed successful and recieved production orders although, AFAIK, no production model had been completed by the time the war ended.

 

So there were no production plans for the Chi-Ri. After it's trials, it was done. Plans were for production of the Chi-To and upgraded Chi-Nu tanks.

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  • 2 months later...

Nice couple of videos posted above. Enjoyed watching them drift those Type 10's! Smart looking tanks. I still miss the Type 61's though. :ph34r:

 

So what's the deal with Japan and the AAV7 then? Do they already have them in service or are they exploring the options of purchasing an amphibious assault vehicle rather than making their own?

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Nice couple of videos posted above. Enjoyed watching them drift those Type 10's! Smart looking tanks. I still miss the Type 61's though. :ph34r:

 

So what's the deal with Japan and the AAV7 then? Do they already have them in service or are they exploring the options of purchasing an amphibious assault vehicle rather than making their own?

The goal outlined by the Japanese defense mid-term plan which covers acquisitions for fiscal years 2014-2018 is that by the end of fiscal year 2018 (March 2019), Japan will have paid for acquiring 52 AAV7 for deployment. These exclude testing ones, which IIRC, Japan bought around 4. They are currently developing a sort of marine-like unit within the JGSDF called the "Amphibious Rapid Deployment Brigade" which will have about 3,000 men. The US helps train them in amphibious operations. They did develop an amphibious vehicle prototype which may form the basis for a new amphibious vehicle. Japan does seem to want something newer with a speed of around 20-25 knots, and does look like they will develop something new, but for the time being, they feel a need to form the amphibious unit now so AA7Vs were purchased to get things up to speed.

 

The prototype unveiled in October 2015.

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Edited by JasonJ
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