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Firearms of note and ridicule


rmgill
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Even more OT, somebody makes (or at least made) a Colt/Root replica. It was an Italian company, but not one of the usual suspects (Euroarms, Armi Sport, Uberti, et al). Might have been Palmetto.

 

Don't recall if they were .44 or .56; Dixie sold them, had one out on the floor last time I was there. Big heavy thing, and expensive (>$1000 IIRC).

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Even more OT, somebody makes (or at least made) a Colt/Root replica. It was an Italian company, but not one of the usual suspects (Euroarms, Armi Sport, Uberti, et al). Might have been Palmetto.

 

Don't recall if they were .44 or .56; Dixie sold them, had one out on the floor last time I was there. Big heavy thing, and expensive (>$1000 IIRC).

 

Dixie Gun Works: Palmetto.

 

Step right up, your bargain awaits.... :D

 

http://www.dixiegunworks.com/product_info.php?products_id=13618

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There was a western with clint Eastwood using a Mauser Broomhandle, although I don't think it was ever fired for real, just bad effects added later.

 

"Joe Kidd"...and a bunch of other films....

 

http://www.imfdb.org/wiki/Mauser_C96

 

There's also a reference to having one on hand by Billy Greenbush in "Tom Horn", but you never see it.

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Two WWII German guns - one a sub machine gun (MP38 or a MP40), one a version of the first assault rifle - had bent barrels to fire round corners, though the assault rifle (Krummer Lauf) also had a mirror on it to see round corners...

 

If memory serves, of limited utility with a massive barrel wear problem.

 

 

Modern - the Israelis have a set up that houses a modern semi auto pistol (a glock is mostly used in promo material, though I have no idea if its limited to glocks or capable of being adjusted...)in the side adjustable front end, with a camera at front and display at the back end. Its a niche weapon intended for special forces units in hostage situations, I would presume. Looks about the size of a full sun machine gun. Google "cornershot".

 

Regards.

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Two WWII German guns - one a sub machine gun (MP38 or a MP40), one a version of the first assault rifle - had bent barrels to fire round corners, though the assault rifle (Krummer Lauf) also had a mirror on it to see round corners...

 

If memory serves, of limited utility with a massive barrel wear problem.

 

 

Modern - the Israelis have a set up that houses a modern semi auto pistol (a glock is mostly used in promo material, though I have no idea if its limited to glocks or capable of being adjusted...)in the side adjustable front end, with a camera at front and display at the back end. Its a niche weapon intended for special forces units in hostage situations, I would presume. Looks about the size of a full sun machine gun. Google "cornershot".

 

Regards.

 

IWM

 

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Bullets now come pre-rifled?!?!?!?!?

 

And the barrels are now...what, smooth?

 

My head hurtz.

 

Nope, the barrel is rifled, the bullets engage this rifling (and take on the pattern in the trip down the bore).

 

LH twist is not unique to Browning's 1911's, but it is encountered less frequently than RH twist in other arms. There seems to be some inconsistency even between certain models and manufacturers over time. From the serendipity with which they apply twist direction, it seems to have no reproducibly demonstrable impact on shooting one way or the other, at least in handguns.

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'Twas a joke, as the 45ACP round was stated to have left hand riffling, not any model of revolver or pistol...a joke, Doug. But that's okay, guess I come across as an idiot sometimes, and my humour is...very specific, at times.

 

I take it Mike meant the 1911A1's are originally left hand riffled, which makes them "unique"...

 

Though it doesn't. Colt had stuff produced in England, and England simply went for left handed rifling traditionally (as I understand it), and Colt picked up from there.

 

Thus, not so "unique".

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Since this thread is going West (well, South), how about the LeMat revolver?

 

 

I fired one of the replicas several years ago that belongs to a friend of mine. It is a big clumsy revolver that was difficult to cock with the shooting hand. The loading lever is also on fragile side, if you use it without the ramrod inserted, it has a tendency to bend. If you loaded the shotgun barrel following using the factory recommended load, the shot would bounced off of a wooden crate.

 

They are for folks who want something different. People probably enjoy it for the novelty of it's odd features, and the history of some of the characters that carried them. However, IMHO, a Colt or a Remington style cap and ball revolver would probably be a better choice for shooting. They sure handle better. If you don't care about the historical aspect, but like to shoot black powder, or front loaders, It is hard to beat a Ruger Old Army.

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'Twas a joke, as the 45ACP round was stated to have left hand riffling, not any model of revolver or pistol...a joke, Doug. But that's okay, guess I come across as an idiot sometimes, and my humour is...very specific, at times.

 

I take it Mike meant the 1911A1's are originally left hand riffled, which makes them "unique"...

 

Though it doesn't. Colt had stuff produced in England, and England simply went for left handed rifling traditionally (as I understand it), and Colt picked up from there.

 

Thus, not so "unique".

 

Well supposedly the left hand rifiling was for mounted use (since most folks were r handed) the pistol would have a tendency to recoil to the left and thus would be more controllable

for mounted use. Dont know how true it is but it sounds plausible . :o

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While the American practice is for right hand twists; Colt guns all have the rifling left handed, which is the English practice.

The reason for this is that after the failure of Col. Colt's first factory in America, he went to London and made his revolvers there for some years;

And as the rifling machines in use there were adapted for a left hand twist, Colt used it, and the Colt guns have been made the same way ever since

Edited by Maxx
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Then there was this combination weapon for spaceship crews for case of landing out of civillisation - a double-barelled shotgun (40 gauge?) plus 5.45mm ball barrel, all single shot. Ah, TP-82.

 

Probably .410...?

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.410? Never fired or touched such a...well, mouse...

 

Which is why 40 gauge sounded beyond pathetic. Shot 20, 12, 12/86...10...uh. 10. Mutant elephant zombie ammo.

 

 

Using the usual convention for establishing "gauge", the .410 is in the high '60's. It is enjoying some resurgence as a defensive round because revolvers designed for it can also (usually) chamber .45 Long Colt ammo. A .410 with 4-5 stacked 00 buckshot balls is nothing to sneeze at:

 

http://www.taurususa.com/gun-selector-results.cfm?series=41

 

I believe it's become so popular, so fast, that Smith & Wesson have had to release a similar firearm so as not to leave this niche unfilled.

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