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Firearms of note and ridicule


rmgill

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It is certainly an ingenious attempt to maximize the cartridge's performance. It would be fun to use a suppressed Nagant in movies, to see how alert gun enthusiasts are. :P

 

As Bob posted, its been done. Look it up on youtube; Also, the Nagant will fire the .32 H&R Magnum and the .32 Smith & Wesson (also the long) - with the caveat = jacketed hollow points or full jackets only, NO lead bullets. Lead fouling builds up fast, and can lead to chamber binding.

 

.32ACP can work, though not consistently; Saying that, a cylinder change will turn it into a reliable .32ACP revolver.

 

For a suppressed weapon, perfectly adequate. I'd have one and would mod the Hell out of it in a heartbeat...if I could.

 

Alas. these Emerald Green Sceptered Isles think ordinary people become Demons if allowed firearms.

 

But that's okay, I've gotten used to re setting a broken nose

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And this is something I had never even heard of, the Porter Revolving Turret Rifle.

 

Reminds me of the mid/late 17th century repeating flintlock guns with separate ball and powder tube magazines in the forearm and/or buttstock feeding a rotating breechblock that gets moved by a crank or lever-action type handle. Obviously quite complicated mechanisms of dubious reliability, not fit for mass production and use back then.

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Looks like the result of a drunken party between a Beretta M92 and a P-38

 

Per IMDB: The "Podbyrin 9.2 mm" is a fictional Russian handgun that was made up as a prop for the movie Red Heat. It is actually an IMI Desert Eagle and a Walther P38 with a custom barrel and other completely custom elements, put together to look like a Soviet weapon.

 

^_^

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I'll also mention the Reising sub-gun. While fine in a clean, civilian environment, it was a failure in the harsh environment of combat.

----

 

 

Evidently was not a bad gun for 'shipboard' use, boarding parties and the like, not too much mud / sand on board a ship.

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Evidently was not a bad gun for 'shipboard' use, boarding parties and the like, not too much mud / sand on board a ship.

Agreed. It was originally designed for police work, and some were used into the Fifties, at least.

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Does this count?

 

Massive Homemade 12 Gauge Revolver

"A Brazilian drug dealer was captured earlier this month along with his gigantic homemade 11 lbs revolver. The revolver chambers five 2.75" 12 gauge cartridges."

 

http://www.thefirearmblog.com/blog/2011/09/29/massive-homemade-12-gauge-revolver/

Edited by shep854
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Agreed. It was originally designed for police work, and some were used into the Fifties, at least.

 

In parallel to the Royal Navy Lanchester as a shipboard machine pistol / submachine gun. The Lanchester also had a bayonet lug, which would have been of some use by boarding parties as an effective form of 'crowd control' against merchant ship crews.

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Does this count?

 

Massive Homemade 12 Gauge Revolver

"A Brazilian drug dealer was captured earlier this month along with his gigantic homemade 11 lbs revolver. The revolver chambers five 2.75" 12 gauge cartridges."

 

http://www.thefirear...gauge-revolver/

 

..."sigh" Hate crap like that. What jackass thought it was a better idea to build such a mess and lug that perversity than walk around with an AK?

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..."sigh" Hate crap like that. What jackass thought it was a better idea to build such a mess and lug that perversity than walk around with an AK?

Makes a hell of a snake gun, though! Bet you it has a better spead than an AK.^_^

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Makes a hell of a snake gun, though! Bet you it has a better spead than an AK.^_^

 

Any snake that needs all of that would be perfectly easy to hit consistently with an AK.

 

Hell, or even a rock.

 

.410, or revolver shot shells for anything not out of Hollywood is fine.

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Crap I have no respect for. Its a tool, yet that thing has no application in sanity.

 

How'd you get past .32 ACP then? :P

 

 

And then...

 

 

this DOES resemble, in principle, this..

 

 

People simply do things because they want to see if they can.

Edited by rmgill
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Any snake that needs all of that would be perfectly easy to hit consistently with an AK.

 

Hell, or even a rock.

 

.410, or revolver shot shells for anything not out of Hollywood is fine.

I dunno; a snake that big might be wanting buckshot (or slugs)! :blink:

 

Look at the bright side; think of the upper-body workout you'd get holding that thing out in an isoceles stance. :ninja:

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...then about this time last year,

in that other thread about crazy "eargesplitten" bullets and whatnot,

and I threw out a link for that huge honkin' McBros .95", ahem, "rifle"

and its .950 JDJ "bullets" machined on a lathe out of bronze for $10 each...

 

Its like a punt gun for hippos :blink: Although i think it could wreck boats.

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Chain fire was pretty much eliminated in pistols with the right kind of wadding; I wonder why it persisted in the rifles.

 

 

Chainfires in percussion revolving firearms are almost always the result of poorly-fitted caps, not lack of seal at the projectile.

 

Not really any such thing as 'wadding' in the percussion era - just ball (or bullet) over powder, maybe some grease/tallow smeared over the front. Patched ball or Minie over powder in rifles, loose ball/buck in smoothbores.

Edited by AdmiralB
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Do you want your hand and face close to that with a rifle load?

 

 

You didn't. The Colt/Root rifles and Remington carbines were not fired with a traditional rifle hold. Even though the Colt had a wooden foreend, you didn't dare use it for the reason you illustrate.

 

Edited by AdmiralB
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You didn't. The Colt/Root rifles and Remington carbines were not fired with a traditional rifle hold. Even though the Colt had a wooden foreend, you didn't dare use it for the reason you illustrate.

 

 

If you get the Western Channel on cable, they air re-runs of "Have Gun Will Travel". There's an episode (with Ben Johnson, I'm pretty sure) that features a Colt/Root revolving rifle prominently.

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If you get the Western Channel on cable, they air re-runs of "Have Gun Will Travel". There's an episode (with Ben Johnson, I'm pretty sure) that features a Colt/Root revolving rifle prominently.

 

Yes they do. :) OT But have you noticed the episodes directed by Boone are somewhat better than the average?

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Yes they do. :) OT But have you noticed the episodes directed by Boone are somewhat better than the average?

 

 

He was a visionary for the time and HGWT is WAY above the other western fair of the era ("Bronco Laine", "Cheyenne", "Sugarfoot" etc.). Even "Maverick" was not in the same class, but better than most.

 

HGWT had episodes that dealt with issues from color to Russian Jewry. Unique on TV from '62 and before. I notice that Boone's episodes often have a "cold close", leaving the viewer to take from the show what he will. No "preaching".

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