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Firearms of note and ridicule


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I'd have to disagree with you. The basic "tround" concept is workable, but it's a case where the materials technology just hasn't caught up with the basic design. Couple the Tround ammunition handling and rotary chamber with a caseless cartridge, and the helical magazine concept pioneered by Calico, and you might have a decent stab at an alternative to the HK G11. I have heard rumors that the initial design by HK for the G11 was highly derivative of this idea, and the only reason they went with the clockwork nightmare they eventually settled on was that the Dardick patents were held by a large US defense company that wanted way too much money for them. That, and the same thing that drove the downfall of the Wankel engines--Sealing the two sides of the "breech".

 

Problem is, Dardick was way ahead of his time, and the materials technology and chemistry just isn't there to enable his ideas to work. Yet. Give it another twenty years, and we may see some of his ideas in another format.

you aren't the only person who likes the tround (me included), hopefully someone will find where they've hidden this prototype someday...

 

I'd suggest the Gerasimenko VAG-739. 48 caseless rounds out of a pistol magazine that fits entirely within the grip, and ballistics comparable to 7.62 tokarev. FiveseveN eat your heart out

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I was going to throw some Combat Reform Sparky gems just for the tangential Hell of it...but he's changed the sight, and I'd rather go through the Chinese Bandits mess than through whatever new bilge he's vomited up.

 

You Americans DO realize what a useful sabotage weapon Sparky could be...?

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Chauchat = possibly the worst industrial production...not only of machine gun specifically, or even fire arms in general...thing that I could possibly think off.

 

Actually it was better than the horrible reputation it has received and it was easy to produce in large numbers under not so optimal conditions. Granted some batches suffered from shoddy production as some of the manufacturers were not really seasoned gun-makers and the 8mm lebel was maybe not the ultimate round for a light machinegun. The ones made in .30 for the US army was not good at all but then the weapon was never really made for that cartridge anyway.

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What is the possible advantage of square bullets and shells?

 

Model 1722 and Schuvalov did not fire square bullets, those fired fired shot and shells in shape of disc. Also shape of Schuvalov's barrel was ideal for canister. Was not worth bother in the end.

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I'd like to include the Podbyrin 9.2mm

 

 

FINGER! TRIGGER!

 

GAAHH. :wacko:

 

 

Edit again..

Gaah. I could never go on a movie set where guns were in use. I'd be fighting the urge to thump people with rolled up newspapers every time I saw bad trigger discipline.

Edited by rmgill
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The Colt Revolving Rifle.

 

From Wikip.

The principal problem was that gunpowder would sometimes leak from the paper cartridges in field conditions, lodging in various recesses around the firing cylinder. Hot gas leaking from the gap between the firing cylinder and the barrel would ignite this powder, which would in turn, ignite all of the powder in the chambers waiting to be fired. This is known as a "chain fire" and was a relatively common failure with early percussion revolving firearms. When this happened with the Colt Revolving Rifle, a spray of metal would be sent forward into the left arm and hand of the user.[2] This fault resulted in an understandable distrust in the weapon.

 

This fault resulted in an understandable distrust in the weapon. ... Some commanders instructed their men to fire the weapon only while supporting it directly in front of the trigger guard or by holding the lowered loading lever, which moved their left hand out of the path of danger during a chain fire. Other commanders instructed their men to load only a single chamber, preventing any chain fires from occurring. Loading a single chamber at a time also reduced the weapon to a single shot weapon, effectively defeated the entire purpose of having a repeating rifle.

 

(replica)

 

And this is something I had never even heard of, the Porter Revolving Turret Rifle.

 

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Actually it was better than the horrible reputation it has received and it was easy to produce in large numbers under not so optimal conditions. Granted some batches suffered from shoddy production as some of the manufacturers were not really seasoned gun-makers and the 8mm lebel was maybe not the ultimate round for a light machinegun. The ones made in .30 for the US army was not good at all but then the weapon was never really made for that cartridge anyway.

I also saw a discussion where poor parts interchangeability was mentioned as part of the problem. According to the speaker (whose name I can't recall), the newer, original guns worked fine.

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I'll also mention the Reising sub-gun. While fine in a clean, civilian environment, it was a failure in the harsh environment of combat.

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Colt also fumbled the ball with the 2000 9mm and Double Eagle pistols.

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(replica)

 

I remember seeing a bunch of revolver rifles in the Red Army museum in Moscow similar to that as well as a bunch of 'carbines' similar in size to most lever actions.

 

Always wondered why they didn't take off.

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I remember seeing a bunch of revolver rifles in the Red Army museum in Moscow similar to that as well as a bunch of 'carbines' similar in size to most lever actions.

 

Always wondered why they didn't take off.

 

This is what you get with moderate loads and modern machining tolerances.

 

 

 

Here's a larger load with possibly looser tolerances.

 

 

Do you want your hand and face close to that with a rifle load?

Edited by rmgill
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My Nagant revolver pushes the cylinder forward into a cone to prevent gas loss. To be fair the round needs all the help it can get...

But then, presumably you don't need a whole lot to inspire reluctant soldiery.

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Jokes aside, the barrel can be threaded and silencer added to produce a silent revolver that keeps its brass with it.

It is certainly an ingenious attempt to maximize the cartridge's performance. It would be fun to use a suppressed Nagant in movies, to see how alert gun enthusiasts are. :P

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